St. Albert (provincial electoral district)

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"St. Albert (electoral district)" redirects here. For the federal electoral district from 1988 to 2004, see St. Albert (federal electoral district).
St. Albert
Flag of Alberta.svg Alberta electoral district
StAlbert in Edmonton.jpg
2010 boundaries
Provincial electoral district
Legislature Legislative Assembly of Alberta
MLA
 
 
 
Stephen Khan
Progressive Conservative
District created 1905
First contested 1905
Last contested 2012

St. Albert formally styled Saint Albert from 1905 to 1909 is a provincial electoral district in Alberta, Canada. The district is one of 87 current districts mandate to return a single member to the Legislative Assembly of Alberta of Alberta, Canada.

This urban riding created in 1905 when the province was founded covers most of the city of St. Albert just northwest of Edmonton in its current boundaries. Since 1905 the riding has decreased in size, at one point stretching all the way to the British Columbia border, through vast tracts of rural area. Today the riding is now an urban one encompassing the small satellite city of St. Albert.

The riding has a long and interesting electoral history, this is one of the few Alberta swing riding's, and has been since its creation. To date new candidates from an incumbent party have only managed to hold the district twice after an incumbent MLA left office.

History[edit]

The electoral district was formed when the province was first created and named Saint Albert. The district stretched from St. Albert all the way to the British Columbia border. The riding was renamed in 1909 and has shrunk many times since eventually becoming an urban riding contained to the city itself.

The 2010 boundary redistribution kept the riding boundaries exactly the same as the 2003 boundary redistribution.[1]

Boundary history[edit]

Electoral history[edit]

Members of the Legislative Assembly for St. Albert[3]
Assembly Years Member Party
1st 1905–1909 Henry McKenney Independent Liberal
2nd 1909–1913 Lucien Boudreau Liberal
3rd 1913–1917
4th 1917–1921
5th 1921–1926 Télesphore St. Arnaud United Farmers
6th 1926 Lucien Boudreau Liberal
1926 Vacant
1926–1930 Lucien Boudreau Liberal
7th 1930–1934 Omer St. Germain United Farmers
1934–1935 Liberal
8th 1935–1940 Charles Holder Social Credit
9th 1940–1944 Lionel Tellier Independent
10th 1944–1948 Charles Holder Social Credit
11th 1948–1952 Lucien Maynard
12th 1952–1955
13th 1955–1959 Arthur Soetaert Liberal
14th 1959–1963 Keith Everitt Social Credit
15th 1963–1967
16th 1967–1971
17th 1971–1975 Ernest Jamison Progressive Conservative
18th 1975–1979
19th 1979–1982 Myrna Fyfe
20th 1982–1986
21st 1986–1989 Bryan Strong NDP
22nd 1989–1993 Dick Fowler Progressive Conservative
23rd 1993–1997 Len Bracko Liberal
24th 1997–2001 Mary O'Neill Progressive Conservative
25th 2001–2004
26th 2004–2008 Jack Flaherty Liberal
27th 2008–2012 Ken Allred Progressive Conservative
28th 2012–present Stephen Khan Progressive Conservative

The electoral district was created in 1905 when the province was founded. The first elected held that year saw hotly contested race between Liberal candidate Lucien Boudreau and Independent Liberal Henry McKenney. The race was very close with McKenney winning by just eight votes. Despite being elected as an Independent McKenney was a supporter of the Rutherford government and caucused with the Liberals.

McKenney only stayed in the St. Albert district for a single term. He decided to run in the Pembina electoral district in the 1909 election. Boudreau ran again that year and won a hotly contested race over future MLA's Wilfrid Gariépy and Omer St. Germain. He was re-elected in 1913 and 1917 facing Conservative candidate Hector Landry both times and winning with comfortable majorities.

Boudreau ran for a fourth term in the 1921 election. He was defeated by United Farmers candidate Telesphore St. Arnaud. Boudreau would run again in the 1926 election as St. Arnaud only sat in office for a single term. He would win a hotly contested race in vote transfers to retake the district. Boudreau would be removed from office on November 18, 1926 after a court convicted Boudreau of bribery and corruption.[4] Boudreau appealed and was re-instated on December 8, 1926.[5]

The 1930 general election would see Omer St. Germain run in a straight fight against Boudreau in a rematch of the 1909 election. St. Germain won with a comfortable majority to retake the seat for the United Farmers.

St. Germain crossed the floor to the Liberals on February 6, 1934.[6] He would run for a second term in office in a hotly contested race against four other candidates in the 1935 election. He would finish third on the first ballot and would end up being defeated by Social Credit candidate Charles Holder in vote transfers. Holder would only last one term in office. He ran in the 1940 general election but was defeated by Independent candidate Lionel Tellier.

Tellier did not run again in the 1944 general election. Charles Holder made a comeback and regained the seat for Social Credit. Holder retired from politics in 1948. Social Credit incumbent Lucien Maynard moved to St. Albert from the Beaver River electoral district and won to hold the seat for his party. He won a second term in the 1952 election.

The 1955 election was won by Liberal candidate Arthur Soetaert defeating Maynard. He would only last a term having been defeated in the 1959 general election by Social Credit candidate Keith Everitt. The 1963 and 1967 elections saw Everitt hold the district. He would be defeated in the 1971 general election by Progressive Conservative candidate Ernest Jamison.

Jamison held the electoral district for a second term in the 1975 general election. He was defeated running for the Progressive Conservative nomination in 1979 by Myrna Fyfe who went on to hold the seat in the 1979 general election for her party.

Fyfe ran for re-election in 1982 and won the largest majority in the history of the district. She ran for a third term in the 1986 general election but was defeated by NDP candidate Bryan Strong in a hotly contested race.

Strong only stayed in office for a single term choosing not to run again in the 1989 general election. Progressive Conservative Dick Fowler picked up the seat for his party. Fowler ran for a second term in the 1993 election but was defeated by Liberal candidate Len Bracko.

Bracko himself would only last a single term in office as he was defeated in the 1997 general election by Progressive Conservative candidate Mary O'Neill in the closest race of the election winning by just 16 votes. O'Neill would win a second term in the 2001 general election.

The 2004 general election would see Liberal candidate Jack Flaherty regain the seat for the Liberals as Mary O'Neill went down to defeat. Flaherty only lasted a single term in office as the riding swung back into the Progressive Conservative column when candidate Ken Allred won a strong majority.

Legislature results[edit]

1905 general election[edit]

1905 Alberta general election results[7] Turnout N/A Swing
Affiliation Candidate Votes % Party Personal
     Independent Liberal Henry McKenney 407 51.00% *
     Liberal Lucien Boudreau 391 49.00% *
Total 798 100%
Rejected, Spoiled and Declined Unknown
Unknown Eligible Electors
     Independent Liberal pickup new district Swing N/A

1909 general election[edit]

1909 Alberta general election results[8] Turnout N/A Swing
Affiliation Candidate Votes % Party Personal
     Liberal Lucien Boudreau 528 50.97% 37.90% 1.97%
     Liberal Wilfrid Gariépy 393 37.93% *
     Independent Liberal Omer St. Germain 115 11.10% *
Total 1,036 100%
Rejected, Spoiled and Declined Unknown
Unknown Eligible Electors
     Liberal pickup from Independent Liberal Swing 19.95%

The 1909 general election saw incumbent Henry McKenney run for re-election in the new electoral district of Pembina as the boundaries of the St. Albert electoral district were significantly changed in the 1909 boundary redistribution.

A meeting was held on March 1, 1909 in Morinville to hear from candidates interested in the nomination for the provincial Liberals. The meeting was very well attended with over 400 delegates. The three candidates were Mayor of St. Albert Lucien Boudreau who was the runner up in the 1905 election as well as Omer St. Germain a farmer from Morinville and Wilfrid Gariépy an Alderman in Edmonton.[9]

Gariépy was presented with a petition of over 500 electors in the constituency of St. Albert requesting him to be the Liberal candidate. The names on the petition added up to two thirds of the voter list in the constituency at the time and made a nomination convention unnecessary. He accepted the request and after a two hour speech declared his candidacy as a straight supporter of the Rutherford government.[9]

At the meeting Boudreau said he was determined to be nominated by convention and St. Germain said he would probably be a candidate.[9] A nominating convention was called on March 6, 1909 and once again held in the town of Morinville. This meeting was only attended by 54 delegates.[10]

Gariépy had pressing business to attend in Edmonton the day of the convention and had asked two representatives to speak on his behalf, they told the convention delegates that Gariépy would not allow his name to go before the convention and that he would choose to contest the election independently of it. St. Germain told the convention that if they chose Boudreau he would retire from the race in his favor. Boudreau was acclaimed by the convention.[11]

The provincial Conservatives had nominated Lucien Dubuc who had run in the previous election in the Peace River electoral district. He was nominated without a convention.[10] He dropped out of the race before the nomination deadline. St. Germain joined the race late as another Independent Liberal candidate after Dubuc retired. By the end of the campaign all three candidates in the race were Rutherford supporters and running as straight Liberals.

Lucien Boudreau won the race taking over half the popular vote on election night, while Gariépy finished a strong second but failed to win the votes of all those that signed the petition for his candidacy. St. Germain finished a distant third.

1913 general election[edit]

1913 Alberta general election results[12] Turnout 74.10% Swing
Affiliation Candidate Votes % Party Personal
     Liberal Lucien Boudreau 620 60.55% -28.35% 9.58%
     Conservative Hector Landry 404 39.45% *
Total 1,024 100%
Rejected, Spoiled and Declined Unknown
1,382 Eligible Electors
     Liberal hold Swing -24.52%

1917 general election[edit]

1917 Alberta general election results[13] Turnout 75.60% Swing
Affiliation Candidate Votes % Party Personal
     Liberal Lucien Boudreau 1,095 59.61% -0.94%
     Conservative Hector Landry 742 40.39% 0.94%
Total 1,837 100%
Rejected, Spoiled and Declined 0
2,430 Eligible Electors
     Liberal hold Swing -0.94%

1921 general election[edit]

1921 Alberta general election results[14] Turnout 76.80% Swing
Affiliation Candidate Votes % Party Personal
     United Farmers Télesphore St. Arnaud 1,234 55.24% *
     Liberal Lucien Boudreau 1,000 44.76% -14.85%
Total 2,234 100%
Rejected, Spoiled and Declined 0
2,909 Eligible Electors
     United Farmers pickup from Liberal Swing 35.05%

1926 general election[edit]

1926 Alberta general election results[15] Turnout 84.44% 1st Count Swing
Affiliation Candidate 1st % 2nd 3rd % Party Personal
     Liberal Lucien Boudreau 1,058 43.11% 1,174 57.07% -1.65%
     Independent Liberal Michael Hogan 683 27.83% 883 42.93% *
     United Farmers Louis Normandeau 628 25.59% -29.65% *
     Conservative J.A. Loiseau 85 3.47% *
Total 2,454 100% ? 2,057 100%
Exhausted Ballots 0 ? ?
Rejected, Spoiled and Declined 119
3,047 Eligible Electors
     Liberal pickup from United Farmers 1st Count Swing -14.74%

1930 general election[edit]

1930 Alberta general election results[16] Turnout 80.02% Swing
Affiliation Candidate Votes % Party Personal
     United Farmers Omer St. Germain 1,427 55.14% 29.55% *
     Liberal Lucien Boudreau 1,161 44.86% 1.75%
Total 2,588 100%
Rejected, Spoiled and Declined 91
3,348 Eligible Electors
     United Farmers pickup from Liberal Swing 15.65%

1935 general election[edit]

1935 Alberta general election results[17] Turnout 84.13% 1st Count Swing
Affiliation Candidate 1st % 2nd 3rd 4th % Party Personal
     Social Credit Charles Holder 1,431 44.63% 1,619 52.84% *
     Independent Liberal Lucien Boudreau 955 29.79% 1,445 47.16% * -15.07%
     Liberal Omer St. Germain 446 13.91% -30.95% -41.23%
     Independent Conservative A.S. McRae 258 8.05% *
     United Farmers J.P. Morissey 116 3.62% -51.52% *
Total 3,206 100% ? ? 3,064 100%
Exhausted Ballots 0 ? ? ?
Rejected, Spoiled and Declined 119
3,811 Eligible Electors
     Social Credit pickup from Liberal 1st Count Swing 29.85%

1940 general election[edit]

1940 Alberta general election results Turnout 71.85% 1st Count Swing
Affiliation Candidate 1st[18] % 2nd 3rd 4th[19] % Party Personal
     Independent Lionel Tellier 1,467 30.49% 2,356 52.19% *
     Social Credit Charles Holder 1,703 35.40% 2,158 47.81% -9.23%
     Liberal J.H. Perras 1,089 22.64% 8.73% *
     Co-operative Commonwealth W.R. Rigney 552 11.47% *
Total 4,811 100% ? ? 4,514 100%
Exhausted Ballots 0 ? ? ?
Rejected, Spoiled and Declined Unknown
6,696 Eligible Electors
     Independent pickup from Social Credit 1st Count Swing 19.86%

1944 general election[edit]

1944 Alberta general election results[20] Turnout 68.46% 1st Count Swing
Affiliation Candidate 1st % 2nd % Party Personal
     Social Credit Charles Holder 2,097 49.49% 2,491 64.74% 14.09%
     Co-operative Commonwealth Earl Toane 1,222 28.84% 1,357 35.26% 17.37% *
     Independent Joseph Nadeau 918 21.67% *
Total 4,237 100% 3,848 100%
Exhausted Ballots 0 389
Rejected, Spoiled and Declined 119
6,319 Eligible Electors
     Social Credit pickup from Independent 1st Count Swing 15.73%

1948 general election[edit]

1948 Alberta general election results[21] Turnout 69.94% Swing
Affiliation Candidate Votes % Party Personal
     Social Credit Lucien Maynard 2,702 59.74% 10.25% *
     Co-operative Commonwealth Joseph Dusseault 1,047 23.15% -5.69% *
     Liberal Omer St. Germain 774 17.11% *
Total 4,523 100%
Rejected, Spoiled and Declined 260
6,839 Eligible Electors
     Social Credit hold Swing 7.97%

1952 general election[edit]

1952 Alberta general election results[22] Turnout 70.63% 1st Count Swing
Affiliation Candidate 1st % 2nd % Party Personal
     Social Credit Lucien Maynard 2,218 44.31% 2,420 54.52% -15.43%
     Liberal Arthur Soetaert 1,496 29.88% 2,019 45.48% 12.77% *
     Co-operative Commonwealth Joseph Dusseault 1,292 25.81% 2.66%
Total 5,006 100% 4,439 100%
Exhausted Ballots 0 567
Rejected, Spoiled and Declined 337
7,565 Eligible Electors
     Social Credit hold 1st Count Swing -14.10%

1955 general election[edit]

1955 Alberta general election results[23] Turnout 79.64% 1st Count Swing
Affiliation Candidate 1st % 2nd 3rd 4th % Party Personal
     Liberal Arthur Soetaert 2,618 44.13% 3,029 53.72% 14.25%
     Social Credit Lucien Maynard 2,509 42.30% 2,610 46.28% -2.01%
     Independent Joseph Dusseault 575 9.69% * -16.12%
     Progressive Conservative Jack Zubick 159 2.68% *
     Independent Aubrey Smith 71 1.20% *
Total 5,932 100% ? ? 5,639 100%
Exhausted Ballots 0 ? ? ?
Rejected, Spoiled and Declined 299
7,824 Eligible Electors
     Liberal pickup from Social Credit 1st Count Swing 8.13%

1959 general election[edit]

1959 Alberta general election results[24] Turnout 62.74% Swing
Affiliation Candidate Votes % Party Personal
     Social Credit Keith Everitt 2,157 36.57% -5.73% *
     Liberal Arthur Soetaert 2,082 35.29% -8.84%
     Progressive Conservative Stanley Walker 1,187 20.12% 17.44% *
     Co-operative Commonwealth Earl Toane 473 8.02% *
Total 5,899 100%
Rejected, Spoiled and Declined 47
9,477 Eligible Electors
     Social Credit pickup from Liberal Swing -7.29%

1963 general election[edit]

1963 Alberta general election results[25] Turnout 55.37% Swing
Affiliation Candidate Votes % Party Personal
     Social Credit Keith Everitt 2,540 39.98% 3.41%
     Liberal Louis Chalifoux 2,030 31.95% -3.34% *
     Progressive Conservative Alan Lazerte 1,332 20.97% 0.85% *
     NDP Alan Bevington 451 7.10% -0.92% *
Total 6,353 100%
Rejected, Spoiled and Declined 21
11,511 Eligible Electors
     Social Credit hold Swing 3.38%

1967 general election[edit]

1967 Alberta general election results[26] Turnout 63.85% Swing
Affiliation Candidate Votes % Party Personal
     Social Credit Keith Everitt 2,824 35.62% -4.36%
     Liberal Robert Russell 2,297 28.97% -2.98% *
     Progressive Conservative Stanley Walker 1,469 18.52% -2.45% *
     NDP Norman Dolman 1,339 16.89% 9.79% *
Total 7,929 100%
Rejected, Spoiled and Declined 40
12,480 Eligible Electors
     Social Credit hold Swing -3.67%

1971 general election[edit]

1971 Alberta general election results[27] Turnout 70.20% Swing
Affiliation Candidate Votes % Party Personal
     Progressive Conservative William Jamison 4,623 42.99% 24.47% *
     Social Credit Keith Everitt 3,592 33.40% -2.22%
     Liberal Robert Russell 1,660 15.44% -13.53%
     NDP Elsie McMillan 878 8.17% -1.62% *
Total 10,753 100%
Rejected, Spoiled and Declined 14
15,337 Eligible Electors
     Progressive Conservative pickup from Social Credit Swing 13.35%

1975 general election[edit]

1975 Alberta general election results[28] Turnout 52.20% Swing
Affiliation Candidate Votes % Party Personal
     Progressive Conservative William Jamison 6,450 54.54% 11.55%
     Social Credit Keith Everitt 2,221 18.78% -14.62%
     NDP Earl Toane 1,591 13.45% 5.28% *
     Liberal John Bakker 1,564 13.23% -2.21% *
Total 11,826 100%
Rejected, Spoiled and Declined 48
22,749 Eligible Electors
     Progressive Conservative hold Swing 13.08%

1979 general election[edit]

1979 Alberta general election results[29] Turnout 57.80% Swing
Affiliation Candidate Votes % Party Personal
     Progressive Conservative Myrna Fyfe 9,361 58.85% 4.31% *
     NDP Robert Borreson 3,178 19.98% 6.53% *
     Social Credit Reginald Petch 1,686 10.60% -8.18% *
     Liberal Gerry Thibault 1,681 10.57% -2.66% *
Total 15,906 100%
Rejected, Spoiled and Declined 47
27,602 Eligible Electors
     Progressive Conservative hold Swing 5.42%

1982 general election[edit]

1982 Alberta general election results[30] Turnout 68.10% Swing
Affiliation Candidate Votes % Party Personal
     Progressive Conservative Myrna Fyfe 12,982 54.72% -4.13%
     NDP Kurt Hoeberg 4,438 18.71% -1.27% *
     Independent William Jamison 3,406 14.36% *
     Western Canada Concept Murray Sillito 2,465 10.39% *
     Social Credit L.D. Callfas 434 1.82% -8.78% *
Total 23,725 100%
Rejected, Spoiled and Declined 50
34,910 Eligible Electors
     Progressive Conservative hold Swing -2.70%

1986 general election[edit]

1986 Alberta general election results[31] Turnout 50.17% Swing
Affiliation Candidate Votes % Party Personal
     NDP Bryan Strong 4,700 41.81% 23.10% *
     Progressive Conservative Myrna Fyfe 4,580 40.75% -13.97%
     Representative William Jamison 1,215 10.81% * -3.55%
     Liberal Thomas Droege 745 6.62% *
Total 11,240 100%
Rejected, Spoiled and Declined 12
22,429 Eligible Electors
     NDP pickup from Progressive Conservative Swing 18.54%

1989 general election[edit]

1989 Alberta general election results[32] Turnout 58.98% Swing
Affiliation Candidate Votes % Party Personal
     Progressive Conservative Dick Fowler 6,590 45.24% 4.49% *
     Liberal Len Bracko 4,278 29.37% 22.75% *
     NDP Cheryl Wharton 3,552 24.38% -17.43% *
     Independent Archie Baldwin 147 1.01% *
Total 14,567 100%
Rejected, Spoiled and Declined 12
24,718 Eligible Electors
     Progressive Conservative pickup from NDP Swing 13.62%

1993 general election[edit]

1993 Alberta general election results[33] Turnout 61.91% Swing
Affiliation Candidate Votes % Party Personal
     Liberal Len Bracko 7,267 51.02% 21.65%
     Progressive Conservative Dick Fowler 5,746 40.34% -4.90%
     NDP John Booth 1,031 7.24% -17.14% *
     Natural Law Gordon Rever 199 1.40% *
Total 14,243 100%
Rejected, Spoiled and Declined 12
23,045 Eligible Electors
     Liberal pickup from Progressive Conservative Swing 13.28%

1997 general election[edit]

1997 Alberta general election results[34] Turnout 60.97% Swing
Affiliation Candidate Votes % Party Personal
     Progressive Conservative Mary O'Neill 6,696 43.61% 3.27% *
     Liberal Len Bracko 6,680 43.50% -7.52%
     NDP Chris Samuel 1,198 7.80% 0.56% *
     Social Credit John Reil 781 5.09% *
Total 15,355 100%
Rejected, Spoiled and Declined 27
25,227 Eligible Electors
     Progressive Conservative pickup from Liberal Swing 5.40%

2001 general election[edit]

2001 Alberta general election results[35] Turnout 63.99% Swing
Affiliation Candidate Votes % Party Personal
     Progressive Conservative Mary O'Neill 9,537 52.58% 8.97%
     Liberal Len Bracko 7,479 41.23% -2.27%
     NDP Michelle Mungall 1,122 6.19% -1.61% *
Total 18,138 100%
Rejected, Spoiled and Declined 63
28,444 Eligible Electors
     Progressive Conservative hold Swing 5.62%

2004 general election[edit]

2004 Alberta general election results[36] Turnout 52.79% Swing
Affiliation Candidate Votes % Party Personal
     Liberal Jack Flaherty 6,476 42.64% 1.41% *
     Progressive Conservative Mary O'Neill 6,062 39.91% -12.67%
     NDP Travis Thompson 1,652 10.88% 4.69% *
     Alberta Alliance Michaela Meldrum 591 3.89% *
Greens Conrad Bitangcol 407 2.68% *
Total 15,188 100%
Rejected, Spoiled and Declined 54
28,872 Eligible Electors
     Liberal pickup from Progressive Conservative Swing 7.04%

2008 general election[edit]

2008 Alberta general election results[37] Turnout 44.74% Swing
Affiliation Candidate Votes % Party Personal
     Progressive Conservative Ken Allred 8,403 54.09% 14.18% *
     Liberal Jack Flaherty 5,598 36.03% -6.61%
     NDP Kathy Campbell 959 6.17% -4.71% *
Greens Ross Vincent 576 3.71% 1.03% *
Total 15,536 100%
Rejected, Spoiled and Declined 94
34,939 Eligible Electors
     Progressive Conservative pickup from Liberal Swing 10.40%

2012 general election[edit]

2012 Alberta general election Turnout % Swing
Affiliation Candidate Votes % Party Personal
     Progressive Conservative Stephen Khan 10,481 53.76 %
     Wildrose James Burrows 4,130 21.18 % *
     Liberal Kim Bugeaud 2,011 10.31 % *
     NDP Nicole Bownes 1,679 8.61 % *
     Alberta Party Tim Osborne 1,195 6.13 % *
Total ' 100%
Rejected, Spoiled and Declined '
Eligible Electors
     Swing %

Senate nominee results[edit]

2004 Senate nominee election district results[edit]

2004 Senate nominee election results: St. Albert[38] Turnout 52.61%
Affiliation Candidate Votes % Votes % Ballots Rank
     Progressive Conservative Betty Unger 5,411 16.28% 49.84% 2
     Independent Link Byfield 4,464 13.43% 41.09% 4
     Progressive Conservative Bert Brown 3,823 11.50% 35.19% 1
     Progressive Conservative Cliff Breitkreuz 3,655 11.00% 33.65% 3
     Independent Tom Sindlinger 2,912 8.76% 26.81% 9
     Alberta Alliance Michael Roth 2,864 8.62% 26.37% 7
     Progressive Conservative David Usherwood 2,737 8.23% 25.20% 6
     Alberta Alliance Gary Horan 2,571 7.73% 23.67% 10
     Alberta Alliance Vance Gough 2,500 7.52% 23.01% 8
     Progressive Conservative Jim Silye 2,304 6.93% 21.21% 5
Total Votes 33,241 100%
Total Ballots 10,863 3.06 Votes Per Ballot
Rejected, Spoiled and Declined 4,325

Voters had the option of selecting 4 Candidates on the Ballot

2012 Senate nominee election district results[edit]

Plebiscite results[edit]

1948 Electrification Plebiscite[edit]

District results from the first province wide plebiscite on electricity regulation.

Option A Option B
Are you in favour of the generation and distribution of electricity being continued by the Power Companies? Are you in favour of the generation and distribution of electricity being made a publicly owned utility administered by the Alberta Government Power Commission?
1,897     44.84% 2,333     55.16%
Province wide result: Option A passed.

1957 liquor plebiscite[edit]

1957 Alberta liquor plebiscite results: St. Albert[39]
Question A: Do you approve additional types of outlets for the
sale of beer, wine and spirituous liquor subject to a local vote?
Ballot Choice Votes %
Yes 2,546 70.27%
No 1,077 29.73%
Total Votes 3,623 100%
Rejected, Spoiled and Declined 92
8,184 Eligible Electors, Turnout 45.39%

On October 30, 1957 a stand alone plebiscite was held province wide in all 50 of the then current provincial electoral districts in Alberta. The government decided to consult Alberta voters to decide on liquor sales and mixed drinking after a divisive debate in the Legislature. The plebiscite was intended to deal with the growing demand for reforming antiquated liquor control laws.[40]

The plebiscite was conducted in two parts. Question A asked in all districts, asked the voters if the sale of liquor should be expanded in Alberta, while Question B asked in a handful of districts within the corporate limits of Calgary and Edmonton asked if men and woman were allowed to drink together in establishments.[39]

Province wide Question A of the plebiscite passed in 33 of the 50 districts while Question B passed in all five districts. St. Albert voted in favour of the proposal by a landslide majority. Voter turnout in the district was almost equal to the province wide average of 46%.[39]

Official district returns were released to the public on December 31, 1957.[39] The Social Credit government in power at the time did not considered the results binding.[41] However the results of the vote led the government to repeal all existing liquor legislation and introduce an entirely new Liquor Act.[42]

Municipal districts lying inside electoral districts that voted against the Plebiscite were designated Local Option Zones by the Alberta Liquor Control Board and considered effective dry zones, business owners that wanted a license had to petition for a binding municipal plebiscite in order to be granted a license.[43]

Student Vote results[edit]

2004 election[edit]

Participating Schools[44]
Neil M. Ross Elementary School
Paul Kane High School
Richard Fowler Junior High School
St. Albert Catholic High School
VJ Maloney Catholic Junior High School

On November 19, 2004 a Student Vote was conducted at participating Alberta schools to parallel the 2004 Alberta general election results. The vote was designed to educate students and simulate the electoral process for persons who have not yet reached the legal majority. The vote was conducted in 80 of the 83 provincial electoral districts with students voting for actual election candidates. Schools with a large student body that reside in another electoral district had the option to vote for candidates outside of the electoral district then where they were physically located.

2004 Alberta Student Vote results[45]
Affiliation Candidate Votes %
     Liberal Jack Flaherty 303 32.13%
     Progressive Conservative Mary O'Neill 254 26.94%
     NDP Travis Thompson 232 24.60%
Greens Conrad Bitangcol 124 13.15%
     Alberta Alliance Michaela Meldrum 30 3.18%
Total 943 100%
Rejected, Spoiled and Declined 35

2012 election[edit]

2012 Alberta Student Vote results
Affiliation Candidate Votes %
     Progressive Conservative Stephen Khan %
     Wildrose James Burrows %
     Liberal %
     Alberta Party Tim Osborne %
     NDP Nicole Bownes %
Total ' 100%

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "Proposed Electoral Division Areas, Boundaries, and Names for Alberta". Alberta Electoral Boundaries Commission. June 2010. p. 22. Retrieved January 14, 2012. 
  2. ^ "E‑4.1". Statutes of the Province of Alberta. Government of Alberta. 2003. p. 68. 
  3. ^ "Members of the Legislative Assembly of Alberta 1905-2006". Legislative Assembly of Alberta. Retrieved February 27, 2010. [dead link]
  4. ^ "Election of Liberal Member for St. Albert Upset By Court". Vol XIX No. 287 (The Lethbridge Herald). November 18, 1926. p. 4. 
  5. ^ "Boudreau's Election In St. Albert Valid". Vol 52 No. 135 (Manitoba Free Press). December 9, 1926. p. 1. 
  6. ^ "Another One Deserts Brownlee". Vol XXVII No. 49 (The Lethbridge Herald). February 7, 1934. p. 1. 
  7. ^ "Saint Albert Official Results 1905 Alberta general election". Alberta Heritage Community Foundation. Retrieved April 16, 2010. 
  8. ^ "St. Albert Results 1909 Alberta general election". Alberta Heritage Community Foundation. Retrieved April 16, 2010. 
  9. ^ a b c "Candidates in St. Albert". Vol V No. 475 (The Edmonton Bulletin). March 2, 1909. p. 2. 
  10. ^ a b "Lucien Boudreau is the nominee". Vol V No. 479 (The Edmonton Bulletin). March 6, 1909. p. 1. 
  11. ^ "To Enter Contest Without a Leader". Vol 36 No. 210 (Manitoba Free Press). March 8, 1909. p. 1. 
  12. ^ "St. Albert Results 1913 Alberta general election". Alberta Heritage Community Foundation. Retrieved April 16, 2010. 
  13. ^ "St. Albert Results 1917 Alberta general election". Alberta Heritage Community Foundation. Retrieved April 16, 2010. 
  14. ^ "St. Albert Results 1921 Alberta general election". Alberta Heritage Community Foundation. Retrieved April 16, 2010. 
  15. ^ "St. Albert Official Results 1926 Alberta general election". Alberta Heritage Community Foundation. Retrieved April 17, 2010. 
  16. ^ "St. Albert Results 1930 Alberta general election". Alberta Heritage Community Foundation. Retrieved April 16, 2010. 
  17. ^ "St. Albert Official Results 1935 Alberta general election". Alberta Heritage Community Foundation. Retrieved April 17, 2010. 
  18. ^ "Nouvelles De Morinville". Vol XII No 26 (in French) (La Survivance). April 3, 1940. p. 50. 
  19. ^ "Tellier Wins". Vol XXXIII No. 92 (The Lethbridge Herald). March 29, 1940. p. 17. 
  20. ^ "St. Albert Official Results 1944 Alberta general election". Alberta Heritage Community Foundation. Retrieved April 17, 2010. 
  21. ^ "St. Albert Results 1948 Alberta general election". Alberta Heritage Community Foundation. Retrieved April 16, 2010. 
  22. ^ "St. Albert Official Results 1952 Alberta general election". Alberta Heritage Community Foundation. Retrieved April 17, 2010. 
  23. ^ "St. Albert Results 1955 Alberta general election". Alberta Heritage Community Foundation. Retrieved April 16, 2010. 
  24. ^ "St. Albert results 1959 Alberta general election". Alberta Heritage Community Foundation. Retrieved January 29, 2012. 
  25. ^ "St. Albert results 1963 Alberta general election". Alberta Heritage Community Foundation. Retrieved January 29, 2012. 
  26. ^ "St. Albert results 1967 Alberta general election". Alberta Heritage Community Foundation. Retrieved January 29, 2012. 
  27. ^ "St. Albert results 1971 Alberta general election". Alberta Heritage Community Foundation. Retrieved January 29, 2012. 
  28. ^ "St. Albert results 1975 Alberta general election". Alberta Heritage Community Foundation. Retrieved January 29, 2012. 
  29. ^ "St. Albert results 1979 Alberta general election". Alberta Heritage Community Foundation. Retrieved January 29, 2012. 
  30. ^ "St. Albert results 1982 Alberta general election". Alberta Heritage Community Foundation. Retrieved January 29, 2012. 
  31. ^ "St. Albert results 1986 Alberta general election". Alberta Heritage Community Foundation. Retrieved January 29, 2012. 
  32. ^ "St. Albert results 1989 Alberta general election". Alberta Heritage Community Foundation. Retrieved January 29, 2012. 
  33. ^ "St. Albert results 1993 Alberta general election". Alberta Heritage Community Foundation. Retrieved January 29, 2012. 
  34. ^ "1997 General Election". Elections Alberta. Retrieved January 26, 2012. 
  35. ^ "St. Albert Official Results 2001 Alberta general election". Elections Alberta. Retrieved March 3, 2010. 
  36. ^ "St. Albert Statement of Official Results 2004 Alberta general election" (PDF). Elections Alberta. Retrieved February 27, 2012. 
  37. ^ The Report on the March 3, 2008 Provincial General Election of the Twenty-seventh Legislative Assembly. Elections Alberta. July 28, 2008. pp. 534–539. 
  38. ^ "Senate Nominee Election 2004 Tabulation of Official Results" (PDF). Elections Alberta. Retrieved February 28, 2010. 
  39. ^ a b c d Alberta Gazette 53 (December 31 ed.). Government of Alberta. 1957. pp. 2,247–2,249. 
  40. ^ "Albertans Vote 2 to 1 For More Liquor Outlets". Vol L No 273 (The Lethbridge Herald). October 31, 1957. pp. 1–2. 
  41. ^ "No Sudden Change In Alberta Drinking Habits Is Seen". Vol L No 267 (The Lethbridge Herald). October 24, 1957. p. 1. 
  42. ^ "Entirely New Act On Liquor". Vol LI No 72 (The Lethbridge Herald). March 5, 1958. p. 1. 
  43. ^ "Bill 81". Alberta Bills 12th Legislature 1st Session. Government of Alberta. 1958. p. 40. 
  44. ^ "School by School results". Student Vote Canada. Retrieved 2008-04-27. [dead link]
  45. ^ "Riding by Riding Results - the Candidates". Student Vote Canada. Retrieved 2008-04-19. [dead link]

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