St. Ann, Missouri

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St. Ann, Missouri
City
City of St. Ann
Location of St. Ann, Missouri
Location of St. Ann, Missouri
Coordinates: 38°43′38″N 90°23′8″W / 38.72722°N 90.38556°W / 38.72722; -90.38556Coordinates: 38°43′38″N 90°23′8″W / 38.72722°N 90.38556°W / 38.72722; -90.38556
Country United States
State Missouri
County St. Louis
Area[1]
 • Total 3.18 sq mi (8.24 km2)
 • Land 3.18 sq mi (8.24 km2)
 • Water 0 sq mi (0 km2)
Elevation 581 ft (177 m)
Population (2010)[2]
 • Total 13,020
 • Estimate (2012[3]) 12,978
 • Density 4,094.3/sq mi (1,580.8/km2)
Time zone Central (CST) (UTC-6)
 • Summer (DST) CDT (UTC-5)
FIPS code 29-63956[4]
GNIS feature ID 0756629[5]

St. Ann is an inner-ring suburb of St. Louis in mid St. Louis County, Missouri, United States. The population was 13,020 at the 2010 census.[6]

History[edit]

The city was established in 1948 but began to develop six years before it was granted the petition of incorporation. Charles F. Vatterott, the developer and builder of most of the residential and commercial properties in St. Ann, started the community as a housing project for families of workers employed in nearby defense plants. It was one of the few defense housing projects in the country to develop into a permanent town. The original homesite was dedicated in honor of Saint Ann, the mother of the Virgin Mary.

Geography[edit]

St. Ann is located at 38°43′38″N 90°23′8″W / 38.72722°N 90.38556°W / 38.72722; -90.38556 (38.727184, -90.385515)[7] in north-central or mid St. Louis County. The city lies directly next to St. Charles Rock Road, Lindbergh Boulevard, and Interstate 70, giving it easy access to other parts of the St. Louis area. St. Ann also borders Lambert-St. Louis International Airport. Municipal neighbors to St. Ann are Bridgeton, Edmundson, Woodson Terrace, Breckenridge Hills, Overland, and a large portion of unincorporated St. Louis County that lies between Maryland Heights and Creve Coeur.

According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 3.18 square miles (8.24 km2), all of it land.[1]

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Year Pop. ±%
2000 13,607 —    
2010 13,020 −4.3%

2010 census[edit]

As of the census[2] of 2010, there were 13,020 people, 5,894 households, and 3,259 families residing in the city. The population density was 4,094.3 inhabitants per square mile (1,580.8/km2). There were 6,496 housing units at an average density of 2,042.8 per square mile (788.7/km2). The racial makeup of the city was 69.5% White, 22.1% African American, 0.3% Native American, 2.2% Asian, 3.0% from other races, and 2.8% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 5.7% of the population.

There were 5,894 households of which 28.3% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 31.6% were married couples living together, 17.9% had a female householder with no husband present, 5.8% had a male householder with no wife present, and 44.7% were non-families. 38.4% of all households were made up of individuals and 12% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.21 and the average family size was 2.93.

The median age in the city was 37.1 years. 22.4% of residents were under the age of 18; 9.2% were between the ages of 18 and 24; 28% were from 25 to 44; 27.4% were from 45 to 64; and 13% were 65 years of age or older. The gender makeup of the city was 47.5% male and 52.5% female.

2000 census[edit]

As of the census[4] of 2000, there were 13,607 people, 6,190 households, and 3,447 families residing in the city. The population density was 4,352.8 people per square mile (1,678.5/km²). There were 6,554 housing units at an average density of 2,096.6 per square mile (808.5/km²). The racial makeup of the city was 82.71% White, 11.44% African American, 0.28% Native American, 1.99% Asian, 0.01% Pacific Islander, 1.79% from other races, and 1.78% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 4.12% of the population.

There were 6,190 households out of which 25.8% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 37.4% were married couples living together, 14.3% had a female householder with no husband present, and 44.3% were non-families. 37.3% of all households were made up of individuals and 13.2% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.19 and the average family size was 2.90.

In the city the population was spread out with 22.3% under the age of 18, 9.5% from 18 to 24, 31.8% from 25 to 44, 20.2% from 45 to 64, and 16.2% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 37 years. For every 100 females there were 93.5 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 87.8 males.

The median income for a household in the city was $32,351, and the median income for a family was $41,135. Males had a median income of $31,091 versus $24,064 for females. The per capita income for the city was $18,318. About 10.4% of families and 12.8% of the population were below the poverty line, including 19.0% of those under age 18 and 6.8% of those age 65 or over.

Education[edit]

The city is served by two school districts, Pattonville School District and Ritenour School District.

St. Louis County Library operates the Rock Road Branch in St. Ann.[8][9]

Police department[edit]

The St. Ann Police Department (SAPD) is responsible for law enforcement within the city. It is staffed with 40 sworn full-time officers. The department has an active reserve program that contributes another dozen fully certified police officer to the force. The SAPD has a Special Response Team (SRT), a K-9 Unit, a Detective Bureau, School Resource Officers, and a DARE Officer. The Department maintains a Neighborhood Watch Program that meets monthly. St. Ann's dispatch center is responsible for dispatching units for St. Ann and the neighboring city of Edmundson. St. Ann also holds prisoners for the city of Edmundson. The SAPD operates out of the St. Ann City Hall, located at 10405 St. Charles Rock Road, which also houses the city's municipal court and jail. The SAPD uses marked and unmarked Dodge Charger and Ford Police Utility vehicles.

The Chief of the SAPD is Aaron Jimenez, who was elected Chief of Police and Marshal Collector of the City of St. Ann in the 2013 municipal election.[10]

Traffic enforcement[edit]

St. Ann is one of eight cities along I-70 (along with Edmundson, Woodson Terrace, Berkeley, Cool Valley, Normandy, Northwoods, and Pine Lawn) included in an Accident Reduction Corridor, which allows the city to impose higher fines for drivers caught speeding or driving recklessly. This designation complements the Missouri Department of Transportation designation of this section of I-70 as a Travel Safe Zone.[11] due to the number of accidents caused by excessive speed.

The department wrote over 17 times more traffic citations than warnings in 2013, according to reports filed with the Missouri Attorney General.[12] In comparison, the St. Louis County Police Department wrote a more modest 1.89 citations to each warning[13] and the Missouri State Highway Patrol gave more warnings than citations in 2013.[14]

Ferguson controversy[edit]

On August 19, 2014, a St. Ann policeman received nationwide notoriety during demonstrations related to the 2014 Ferguson unrest. The St. Ann policeman, Lieutenant Ray Albers, was videotaped pointing a loaded rifle at unarmed protesters and threatening to kill them in a profanity-laced tirade. He was escorted away from the area by a St. Louis County Police sergeant and suspended from duty the next day, following a complaint from the Missouri branch of the ACLU.[15] Lt. Albers was suspended without pay by St. Ann Police Chief Aaron Jiminez pending an Internal Affairs Investigation. The City's Civilian Police Advisory Board recommended that Albers resign or that his employment be terminated. On August 25, 2014, Lt. Albers resigned.[16] Police Chief Aaron Jiminez told the Post-Dispatch that he wasn't "condoning his behavior whatsoever" but defended Albers' action of pointing his gun at protestors, saying it was "totally justifiable." [17]

Business[edit]

Northwest Plaza, the largest enclosed shopping mall in Missouri, was located in St. Ann. However, the mall was closed in October 2010. At its peak, the mall contained 9 anchor stores and 210 smaller stores. Northwest Plaza was mostly demolished in 2013 to make way for the Crossings at Northwest a mixed-use retail and office project. Menard's, a regional home improvement store chain, broke ground for their fourth store in the St. Louis Metro Area in April 2014 with a projected opening of late fall or early 2015.

Parks[edit]

The city's six parks are Tiemeyer, Livingston & Wright, Buder, St. Ann, Schafer and Mary Ridge. St. Ann also has a 34-par, 9-hole golf course on 55 acres (220,000 m2) just outside of St. Ann Park.

References[edit]

External links[edit]