St. Casimir Church, Baltimore

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St. Casimir Church
St. Casimir Church is located in Baltimore
St. Casimir Church
St. Casimir Church
Coordinates: 39°16′48″N 76°34′38″W / 39.280086°N 76.577217°W / 39.280086; -76.577217
Location 2736 O'Donnell Street, Baltimore, Maryland
Country USA
Denomination Roman Catholic
Website St. Casimir Church
History
Founded November 9, 1902 (1902-11-09)
Founder(s) James Cardinal Gibbons
Dedicated 1926 (1926)
Consecrated  ()
Architecture
Functional status Active
Heritage designation For Polish immigrants
Architect(s) Palmer, Willis and Lamden
Architectural type Church
Style Neo-Renaissance
Groundbreaking 1926 (1926)
Completed 1926 (1926)
Specifications
Capacity 1,400
Length 225 feet
Width 75 feet
Height 110 feet

St. Casimir Church is a parish church of the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Baltimore located in the Canton neighborhood of Baltimore, Maryland.

History[edit]

St. Casimir's was established as a parish in 1902, becoming an independent parish in 1904. It was established to serve the needs of the growing Polish American community in Baltimore. The church building was built and dedicated in 1927. By that time the Poles were becoming so numerous in Baltimore that less than a year later another Polish Catholic church was established in a neighboring parish, the Holy Rosary Church.[1] There were over 11,000 Polish immigrants living in Baltimore at the time.[2]

In 2000, the St. Stanislaus Kostka church, another Polish Catholic church in Baltimore, was merged into St. Casimir's and the sacramental registers were transferred to St. Casimir's.

The church is designated as a Polish parish and is administered by the Conventual Franciscans.[3]

Architecture[edit]

The building's overall design is in the Neo-Renaissance style. It is also an example of the Polish Cathedral style.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ American-Polish Chamber of Commerce and Industry (1928). Poland, Volume 9. New York, N.Y.: Poland America Company. p. 371. 
  2. ^ Chapelle, Suzanne Ellery Greene (2000). Baltimore: an illustrated history. Sun Valley, California: American Historical Press. p. 158. ISBN 1892724111. 
  3. ^ "Archdiocese of Baltimore National Parishes". St. Mary's Seminary and University. Retrieved 2012-08-26. 

External links[edit]