St. Louis Lions

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St. Louis Lions
Stlouislions.png
Full name St. Louis Lions Soccer Club
Nickname(s) The Lions
Founded 2006
Stadium Tony Glavin Soccer Park
Cottleville, Missouri
Ground Capacity 6,200
Owner Tony Glavin
Head Coach Tony Glavin
League USL Premier Development League
2014 2nd, Heartland
Playoffs: Conference Semifinals
Website Club home page
Current season

St. Louis Lions is an American soccer team based in St. Louis, Missouri, United States. Founded in 2006, the team plays in the USL Premier Development League (PDL), the fourth tier of the American Soccer Pyramid, in the Heartland Division of the Central Conference.

The team plays its home games at the Tony Glavin Soccer Complex in nearby Cottleville, Missouri, where they have played since 2006. The team's colors are green and white.

The Lions also field a team in the USL’s Super-20 League, a league for players 17 to 20 years of age run under the United Soccer Leagues umbrella.

In 2011 the Lions officially became a partner with Celtic Football Club, which will see Tony Glavin's youth academy of every age partnering with Celtic coaches to further their individual training as well as establishing connections with not only Celtic but further worldwide footballing organizations.[1]

History[edit]

The St. Louis Lions entered the PDL in 2006 under the leadership of Scottish-born former professional Tony Glavin, who played for Queen's Park in Scotland in the 1980s and for the old St. Louis Steamers in the Major Indoor Soccer League. The first couple of games were difficult for the Lions, as they struggled to find their feet in the PDL. They lost their opening fixture 2-0 to Des Moines Menace, and despite a come-from-behind 3-2 win over Sioux Falls Spitfire, finished their first month in competition with just four points on the board. However, the 0-0 tie with Colorado Springs Blizzard on May 28 initiated an astonishing 12-game unbeaten streak which stretched to the end of the season. The Lions were rampant, tallying several impressive victories (3-0 over West Michigan Edge, 5-1 over Cleveland Internationals), and keeping their home at the Tony Glavin Complex a fortress. Despite this, the Lions just failed to make the playoffs, beaten into fourth place in the Heartland Division by their strong opponents -but nevertheless, 7 wins and 27 points in their debut season was a promising beginning for the franchise. Strikers Lawrence Olum and Tommy Heinemann were the top scorers with 17 goals between them.

The 2007 season was better still for the Lions, as they made the playoffs for the first time, at the second attempt. The Lions were certainly one of the more entertaining teams in the division, going through the entire season without a single tie: wins included a several high-scoring encounters with Springfield Demize, an impressive 4-1 road victory over Thunder Bay Chill that featured a hat trick from Tommy Heinemann, a see-sawing 4-3 win over Indiana Invaders at the beginning of July, and a devastating 8-0 demolition of Springfield which saw them secure their playoff spot before the final weekend. The Lions finished the year second in the Heartland behind Thunder Bay, but unfortunately their trip to the post-season was a short one, as they were comprehensively beaten 4-1 by Great Lakes champions Michigan Bucks. Tommy Heinemann was again the Lions' top scorer with 14 goals, while Jarius Holmes tallied 7 assists.

Having enjoyed a successful sophomore season, the Lions were looking for more success in 2008, and started the year well: they began their campaign with a 6-game unbeaten run that included an impressive opening day victory on the road at regional powerhouse Des Moines Menace. Their string early season form also took the Lions to the US Open Cup for the first time, where they faced USL1 franchise Minnesota Thunder, who eventually ran out 4-1 winners. Unfortunately, the month of June saw the Lions play Thunder Bay Chill four times in nine days - twice at home, twice in Ontario - and lose each game, scoring four goals but conceding 11 to the eventual national champions. These games seemed to affect St. Louis' confidence, and they struggled through their last six games: the hopeless Springfield Demize made them score two late goals to secure an uncharacteristically difficult 3-2 win (although they did beat their Missouri rivals 4-0 next time out), and they traded a barrage of goals with Colorado Rapids U23's only to eventually run out on the wrong end of a 5-4 scoreline. The Lions' playoff push was floundering by the last day of the season, and although they beat Kansas City Brass 3-2 on the final game, other results did not go their way, and they ended the year in fourth, two points off the post-season slot. The prolific Tommy Heinemann was the Lions' top scorer for the third straight year with 13 goals, while Jarius Holmes again tallied 7 assists.

On December 17, 2008, Lions owner Tony Glavin announced his intention for the team to turn professional and join the USL First Division in time for the 2010 season,[2] but these plans were shelved following the dispute between USL team owners and the subsequent formation of the new North American Soccer League.

Players[edit]

Current roster[edit]

As of June 4, 2011.[3]

Note: Flags indicate national team as defined under FIFA eligibility rules. Players may hold more than one non-FIFA nationality.

No. Position Player
1 United States GK Israel Becerra
2 England DF James Thorpe[4]
3 Brazil DF Pedro Franco
4 United States DF Michael Mesle[5]
5 Bosnia and Herzegovina DF Ernad Čavka[6]
7 Brazil FW Henrique Sousa[7]
8 United States MF B. A. Catney[8]
10 United States FW Kenny Kranz[9]
12 Bosnia and Herzegovina MF Tarik Šehović[10]
13 United States MF Ryan Covey[11]
14 Scotland MF Troy McKerrell
15 Germany FW Simon Harrsen[12]
16 United States DF Blaine Veldhuis[13]
17 Honduras FW David Flores
No. Position Player
18 United States MF Tyler Nichol[14]
19 Bosnia and Herzegovina DF Alen Bradarić[15]
20 Republic of Ireland DF Gavin Smith[16]
21 United States FW Dan Meagher[17]
23 England MF Dean Lovegrove[18]
24 United States DF John Bilyeu
25 England DF Alan Percival[19]
27 United States FW Patrick Kelly
28 United States MF Cody Costakis[20]
30 United States GK D. J. Lampert[21]
31 United States GK Chris Eason
33 United States MF Andres Acosta
United States MF Corey Loberg
Peru FW Luis Percovich

Notable former players[edit]

This list of notable former players comprises players who went on to play professional soccer after playing for the team in the Premier Development League, or those who previously played professionally before joining the team.

Year-by-year[edit]

Year Division League Regular Season Playoffs Open Cup
2006 4 USL PDL 4th, Heartland Did not qualify Did not qualify
2007 4 USL PDL 2nd, Heartland Conference Semifinals Did not qualify
2008 4 USL PDL 4th, Heartland Did not qualify 1st Round
2009 4 USL PDL 4th, Heartland Did not qualify Did not qualify
2010 4 USL PDL 5th, Heartland Did not qualify Did not qualify
2011 4 USL PDL 5th, Heartland Did not qualify Did not qualify
2012 4 USL PDL 7th, Heartland Did not qualify Did not qualify
2013 4 USL PDL 5th, Heartland Did not qualify Did not qualify
2014 4 USL PDL 2nd, Heartland Conference Semifinals Did not qualify

Head coaches[edit]

Stadia[edit]

Supporters[edit]

St. Louligans: Established in the summer of 2010 from multiple groups of then AC St. Louis supporters, The Louligans are the largest organized supporters group in the St. Louis area, in addition to being an all-soccer fan club by providing gameday support for the Illinois Piasa and St. Louis University Billikins Soccer Club.St. Louligans Online

Average attendance[edit]

Attendance stats are calculated by averaging each team's self-reported home attendances from the historical match archive at http://www.uslsoccer.com/history/index_E.html.

  • 2006: 336 (8th in PDL)
  • 2007: 561
  • 2008: 377
  • 2009: 301
  • 2010: 287

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Celtic Football Club". Celticfc.net. 2011-06-27. Retrieved 2011-08-02. 
  2. ^ Home. "St. Louis Lions | Welcome to the 2011 Season". Stllions.com. Retrieved 2011-08-02. 
  3. ^ "United Soccer Leagues (USL)". Uslsoccer.com. Retrieved 2011-08-02. 
  4. ^ "M. Soccer: James Thorpe :: Young Harris College Athletics". Yhcathletics.com. 1991-04-06. Retrieved 2011-08-02. 
  5. ^ "Ottawa University Athletics - 2011 Men's Soccer Roster". Ottawabraves.com. 1989-10-01. Retrieved 2011-08-02. 
  6. ^ http://athletics.hssu.edu/roster.cfm?spabrv=msoc
  7. ^ "Soccer (M) | rsuhillcats.com Mobile". M.rsuhillcats.com. Retrieved 2011-08-02. 
  8. ^ "Midwestern State Mustangs - 2010 Men's Soccer Roster". Msumustangs.com. Retrieved 2011-08-02. 
  9. ^ "Player Bio: Kenny Kranz - Northern Illinois Official Athletic Site". Niuhuskies.com. Retrieved 2011-08-02. 
  10. ^ "Harris-Stowe State University - 2010 Men's Soccer Roster". Hornetsathletics.com. Retrieved 2011-08-02. 
  11. ^ "Montana State University Billings - 2010 Men's Soccer Roster". Msubsports.com. Retrieved 2011-08-02. 
  12. ^ "Lindenwood University Athletics - 2010 Men's Soccer Roster". Lindenwoodlions.com. Retrieved 2011-08-02. 
  13. ^ "Blaine Veldhuis Biography - Central Connecticut State University Athletics". Ccsubluedevils.com. 2010-08-27. Retrieved 2011-08-02. 
  14. ^ "tyler nichol". Rockhurst.edu. Retrieved 2011-08-02. 
  15. ^ "Lindenwood University Athletics - 2009 Men's Soccer Roster". Lindenwoodlions.com. Retrieved 2011-08-02. 
  16. ^ "Lambuth University - 2009 Men's Soccer Roster". Lambutheagles.com. Retrieved 2011-08-02. 
  17. ^ "Athletics - Truman State University". Gobulldogs.truman.edu. 1988-04-09. Retrieved 2011-08-02. 
  18. ^ "Midwestern State Mustangs - 2010 Men's Soccer Roster". Msumustangs.com. 1989-04-28. Retrieved 2011-08-02. 
  19. ^ "Webber International University Athletics - 2010 Men's Soccer Roster". Webberathletics.com. Retrieved 2011-08-02. 
  20. ^ "CodyCostakis | Bear Sports | Washington University in St. Louis". Bearsports.wustl.edu. Retrieved 2011-08-02. 
  21. ^ "Quincy University Athletics - 2010 Men's Soccer Roster". Hawks.quincy.edu. Retrieved 2011-08-02. 

External links[edit]