St. Mark's Church, Royal Tunbridge Wells

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St. Mark's Church
Church of St. Mark
St. Mark's Church
51°06′52″N 0°15′07″E / 51.114494°N 0.252082°E / 51.114494; 0.252082Coordinates: 51°06′52″N 0°15′07″E / 51.114494°N 0.252082°E / 51.114494; 0.252082
OS grid reference TQ5773137434
OS grid reference TQ5773137434
Location Royal Tunbridge Wells
Country England
Denomination Anglican
Website St. Mark's Church
History
Founder(s) Earl of Abergavenny
Dedication St. Mark
Consecrated 1866
Architecture
Status parish church
Functional status Active
Heritage designation Grade II*
Designated 7 June 1996
Architect(s) Robert Lewis Roumieu
Architectural type Late Gothic Revival
Style French Gothic
Groundbreaking 1864
Completed 1866
Specifications
Spire height 130 ft (40 m)
Materials Stone
Administration
Parish Broadwater Down
Deanery Tunbridge Wells
Diocese Rochester
Province Canterbury

St. Mark's Church is the Church of England parish church for the Broadwater Down area of Royal Tunbridge Wells, Kent, England,[1] in the Diocese of Rochester.[2] Built in the 19th-century Gothic Revival style by Robert Lewis Roumieu, it is a Grade II* listed building.[3]

The Caen stone font and some of the stained glass

History[edit]

St. Mark's Church was built as the result of personal intervention from William Nevill, 4th Earl of Abergavenny. He had begun developing a section of the Abergavenny Estate with residential mansions, but late in the process he determined to build a church and parsonage at his own personal expense, which reduced the number of mansions ultimately built to 46.[4] The church was funded by the 4th Earl, and designed by architect Robert Lewis Roumieu.[3] Construction began in 1864 after the laying of the foundation stone by the Countess of Abergavenny. It was consecrated in 1866.

Design[edit]

The church was designed in the French Gothic style of Late Gothic Revival architecture.[5] It was built using stone from the Earl of Abergavenny's own quarries and Bath stone for the carvings. The spire is 130 feet high.[5] Inside, the font and pulpit were made from Caen stone. Its stained glass windows were installed as a memorial to the Earl when he died and depict the four major prophets and the Four Evangelists.[5] Roumieu was given freedom in his design of the building, which was referred to by Building News as "acrobatic gothic".[3]

The church also has a set of chimes installed in the clock tower. They was funded by public donations in commemoration of the Diamond Jubilee of Queen Victoria and were first used in 1898. In 2005, the chimes were stopped in order to carry out repairs and were due to be restarted in September 2012 however this was delayed due to concerns from local residents.[6]

Usage[edit]

The church is used for regular Sunday services[2] and has also been used to host fund-raising concerts.[7] It was the venue for the 2009 wedding of former Casualty actress Rebekah Gibbs.[8]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ A Church Near You. "Tunbridge Wells, St. Mark (Broadwater Down)". Church of England. Retrieved 2012-07-01. 
  2. ^ a b A Church Near You. "St Mark (Broadwater Down), Tunbridge Wells - Kent - Diocese of Rochester". Church of England. Retrieved 2012-07-01. 
  3. ^ a b c "CHURCH OF ST MARK". English Heritage. 1974-06-07. Retrieved 2012-07-01. 
  4. ^ "14 Broadwater Down". Tunbridge Wells Borough Council. November 2000. Retrieved 2012-07-01. 
  5. ^ a b c Thomas, J. Radford (1883). Pelton's Illustrated Guide to Tunbridge Wells. Tunbridge Wells: Richard Pelton. p. 113. ISBN 1279339381. 
  6. ^ http://www.tunbridgewellspeople.co.uk/Plan-Tunbridge-Wells-bells-sparks-war-residents/story-16847927-detail/story.html
  7. ^ "Limelight at last for No 1". This is Kent. 2012-06-14. Retrieved 2012-07-01. 
  8. ^ "Beks' wedding belles; PALS JOIN BRAVE CASUALTY STAR ON HER BIG DAY.". Daily Mirror (archived by Thefreelibrary.com). Retrieved 2012-07-01. 

External links[edit]