St. Philip's School

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St. Philip's Grammar School for Boys
Birmingham Oratory - Hagley Road - St Philip's Grammar School.jpg
Established 1887
Closed 1976
Type Grammar school
Religion Roman Catholic
Location Hagley Road
Edgbaston
West Midlands
B16 8UF
England Coordinates: 52°28′20″N 1°55′47″W / 52.4722°N 1.9298°W / 52.4722; -1.9298
Local authority (Birmingham)
Gender Boys
Ages 11–18

St. Philip's Grammar School was a Roman Catholic grammar school for boys located on Hagley Road in Birmingham, England.

History[edit]

St Philip's was founded when two priests of the Birmingham Oratory took over an existing Catholic Grammar School in 1887. It should not be confused with the Oratory School founded by Cardinal Newman in 1859 and later moved to Pangbourne, near Reading.

The school started in the Little Oratory on 19 September 1887 until the main building was completed on 13 December 1887. The longest-serving teacher in the school's history was Francis Thomas Leighton,who served as "Second Master" (Deputy Head) from 1911 until 1945, having served as Headmaster when the School was evacuated to Ludlow in 1941. His two sons, and later, grandson, also attended the school. FT Leighton finally left to found an independent Preparatory School, Leighton House School, serving as a "feeder" school for St Philip's. The school ceased to accept new entrants as a boys Grammar School in 1976, while the 1975 cohort progressed through to 1980.[citation needed]

Sixth form college[edit]

It became St Philip's Roman Catholic Sixth Form College in 1976, with around 800 sixth formers. In October 1992, due to only 30% of the intake being Catholic, the board of governors unsuccessfully attempted to change it to an 11-16 boys' secondary school, resulting in the Hagley Road site closing in August 1995. It temporarily became a site of South Birmingham College from 1995 but was vacated within a few years. The main school buildings were demolished in the early months of 2012.[citation needed]

Notable alumni[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b A History of St Philips, from Beginning to Beginning, Margaret Worsley, Wine Press, Tamworth, 1997; ISBN 1-86237-078-8
  2. ^ Friesen, Darryl (24 October 1995). "The Tolkien Timeline". The Grey Havens. Retrieved 2006-03-13. 
  3. ^ A History of St Philips, from Beginning to Beginning by Margaret Worsley, Wine Press, Tamworth 1997, ISBN 1-86237-078-8
  4. ^ Janus, The Papers of Field Marshal Slim

External links[edit]