St. Vincent de Paul Church (Los Angeles, California)

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St. Vincent de Paul Church
St. Vincent Catholic Church, Los Angeles.JPG
St. Vincent Catholic Church
Location 621 W. Adams Boulevard, South Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California 90007
Coordinates 34°01′44″N 118°16′35″W / 34.02889°N 118.27639°W / 34.02889; -118.27639Coordinates: 34°01′44″N 118°16′35″W / 34.02889°N 118.27639°W / 34.02889; -118.27639
Built 1925
Architect Albert C. Martin, Sr.
Governing body Archdiocese of Los Angeles
Designated July 11, 1971[1]
Reference No. 90
St. Vincent de Paul Church (Los Angeles, California) is located in Los Angeles Metropolitan Area
St. Vincent de Paul Church (Los Angeles, California)
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Location of St. Vincent de Paul Church in Los Angeles Metropolitan Area

St. Vincent de Paul Church is a Roman Catholic parish and Los Angeles Historic-Cultural Monument (No. 90) in the South Los Angeles section of Los Angeles, California. The church was built in the 1920s and designed by architect Albert C. Martin, Sr. Dedicated in 1925, it was located in what was then one of the wealthiest sections of the city, on land adjacent to the Edward Doheny Mansion and Stimson House. It was the second Roman Catholic church in Los Angeles to be consecrated. Composer Amédée Tremblay notably served as the church's organist from 1925–1949.[2]

The climactic scene of the 1999 film End of Days, featuring Arnold Schwarzenegger's battle against Satan was filmed in the church. The church's altar is featured prominently in the film's final scenes. The church also appears in the movie Constantine. The church was also featured in the Warrant video "The Biller Pill" (acoustic version), with lead singer Jani Lane performing the song in front of and around the church.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Los Angeles Department of City Planning (September 7, 2007). Historic – Cultural Monuments (HCM) Listing: City Declared Monuments (PDF). City of Los Angeles. Retrieved 2008-05-29. 
  2. ^ Gilles Potvin. "Amédée Tremblay". The Canadian Encyclopedia. Retrieved 25 April 2010. 

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