St. Walburga's Academy

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St. Walburga's Academy
St Walburga 140th St from NW.jpg
St. Walburga's Academy is located in New York City
St. Walburga's Academy
Location 630 Riverside Dr., New York, New York
Coordinates 40°49′27″N 73°57′18″W / 40.82417°N 73.95500°W / 40.82417; -73.95500Coordinates: 40°49′27″N 73°57′18″W / 40.82417°N 73.95500°W / 40.82417; -73.95500
Area less than one acre
Built 1911
Architect Kearney, John W.
Architectural style Late Gothic Revival
Governing body Private
NRHP Reference # 04000755[1]
Added to NRHP July 28, 2004

St. Walburga's Academy of the Society of the Holy Child Jesus is an historic academy located at 630 Riverside Drive and 140th Street in New York City.[2]

Construction on the Gothic Revival structure designed by architect John W. Kearney began in 1911, and in 1913 the school opened, serving as both a boarding and day school for girls.[3] In 1957, the school relocated to Rye, New York and changed its name to the School of the Holy Child.[2] In 1998, the building was purchased by the Fortune Society, a non-profit organization focused on helping those released from prison to transition back into society, and was restored.[3] In April 2002, the newly named Fortune Academy opened and can house up to 62 homeless previously incarcerated individuals.[4] On July 28, 2004, St. Walburga's Academy was added to the National Register of Historic Places.[5]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "National Register Information System". National Register of Historic Places. National Park Service. 2009-03-13. 
  2. ^ a b "POSTINGS: At Riverside Drive and 140th Street; Gothic 'Castle' To House Ex-Prisoners". New York Times. 2000-11-05. Retrieved 2009-12-05. 
  3. ^ a b "The Fortune Academy:Housing for Homeless Ex-Prisoners From Dream to Reality". Office of Justice Programs. Retrieved 2009-12-04. 
  4. ^ "Fortune Academy". The Fortune Society. Retrieved 2009-12-04. [dead link]
  5. ^ "National Register of Historic Places". National Register of Historic Places. United States National Park Service. 2004-08-06. Retrieved 2009-12-04.