St Alban the Martyr, Birmingham

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St Alban the Martyr, Birmingham
Church of St Alban and St Patrick, Highgate, Birmingham
St Alban the Martyr, Birmingham
52°27′57″N 1°53′18″W / 52.46583°N 1.88833°W / 52.46583; -1.88833Coordinates: 52°27′57″N 1°53′18″W / 52.46583°N 1.88833°W / 52.46583; -1.88833
Location Conybere Street, Highgate, Birmingham
Country England
Denomination Church of England
Churchmanship Anglo-Catholic
Website www.saintalban.co.uk
History
Dedication Saint Alban
Consecrated 4 December 1899
Architecture
Heritage designation Grade II* listed
Designated 25 April 1952
Architect(s) John Loughborough Pearson
Architectural type Gothic revival architecture
Groundbreaking 1880
Completed 1881 (1881)
Construction cost £20,000
Specifications
Length 130 feet (40 m)
Width 76 feet (23 m)
Nave width 26.5 feet (8.1 m)
Height 170 feet (52 m)
Administration
Parish Highgate
Deanery Central Birmingham
Archdeaconry Birmingham
Diocese Anglican Diocese of Birmingham

St Alban the Martyr, Birmingham is a Grade II* listed Church of England parish church in the Anglican Diocese of Birmingham.[1] It is dedicated to Saint Alban, the first British Christian martyr.[2]

History[edit]

A temporary church was established as a mission of Holy Trinity Church, Bordesley in 1865, and a temporary church was opened on 13 September 1866.[3]

The permanent church was designed by John Loughborough Pearson and built by the contractor Shillitoe of Doncaster.[4] Work started in 1880 and the church was opened in 1881. The formal consecration took place on 4 December 1899.[5] The construction cost was in the region of £20,000 (£1,905,792 in 2015).[6]

The patron is Keble College, Oxford.

St Alban's Church took over the parish of St Patrick's Church, Bordesley when St Patrick's was demolished in the early 1970s.

Architecture[edit]

The reredos, and 1938 silver tabernacle

The cruciform building is in red brick, with dressings in ashlar. The tower and spire were added in 1938 by Edwin Francis Reynolds. The interior features a stained glass east window by Henry Payne and, in the south chapel, a copper Arts and Crafts triptych with painted panels, by local artists Kate and Myra Bunce[7] and donated by them in 1919 in memory of their sisters and parents.[5]

Vicars[edit]

  • 1865 (1865)–1894 (1894) – James Samuel Pollock
  • 1895 (1895)–1896 (1896) – Thomas Benson Pollock
  • 1897 (1897)–1900 (1900) – George Philip Trevelyan
  • 1900 (1900)–1910 (1910) – Canon Alfred Cecil Scott
  • 1910 (1910)–1911 (1911) – Mark Napier Trollope
  • 1911 (1911)–1923 (1923) – Francis Underhill
  • 1923 (1923)–1953 (1953) – Dudley Clark
  • 1953 (1953)–1981 (1981) – Canon Lawrence Goodrich Harding
  • 1982 (1982)–1986 (1986) – David Handley Hutt
  • 1987 (1987)–1993 (1993) – Michael Hedley Bryant
  • 1995 (1995)–2004 (2004) – Canon James G. Pendorf

Organ[edit]

The organ dates from 1870 and was by Bryceson Son & Ellis. A specification of the organ can be found on the National Pipe Organ Register.[8]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ The buildings of England. Warwickshire, Nikolaus Pevsner
  2. ^ Thurston, Herbert. "St. Alban." The Catholic Encyclopedia. Vol. 1. New York: Robert Appleton Company, 1907. 19 Feb. 2013
  3. ^ "Dedication Services at St Alban's". Birmingham Journal (Birmingham). 15 September 1866. Retrieved 26 March 2015. 
  4. ^ "The Church of St Alban, Birmingham". Birmingham Daily Post (Birmingham). 29 April 1881. Retrieved 26 March 2015. 
  5. ^ a b S. Alban and S. Patrick, Birmingham 12. St Alban's. Undated (circa 1984-1986).  Check date values in: |date= (help)
  6. ^ UK CPI inflation numbers based on data available from Gregory Clark (2014), "What Were the British Earnings and Prices Then? (New Series)" MeasuringWorth.
  7. ^ "1290539 - The National Heritage List for England". English Heritage. Retrieved 24 December 2013. 
  8. ^ St. Alban and St. Patrick, Conybere Street from The National Pipe Organ Register, retrieved 4 March 2015

External links[edit]