St Alban the Martyr, Birmingham

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St Alban the Martyr, Birmingham
Church of St Alban and St Patrick, Highgate, Birmingham
St Alban the Martyr, Birmingham
52°27′57″N 1°53′18″W / 52.46583°N 1.88833°W / 52.46583; -1.88833Coordinates: 52°27′57″N 1°53′18″W / 52.46583°N 1.88833°W / 52.46583; -1.88833
Location Conybere Street, Highgate, Birmingham
Country England
Denomination Church of England
Website www.saintalban.co.uk
History
Dedication Saint Alban
Consecrated 4 December 1899
Architecture
Heritage designation Grade II* listed
Designated 25 April 1952
Architect(s) John Loughborough Pearson
Architectural type Gothic revival architecture
Groundbreaking 1880
Completed 1881 (1881)
Construction cost £20,000
Administration
Parish Highgate
Deanery Central Birmingham
Archdeaconry Birmingham
Diocese Anglican Diocese of Birmingham

St Alban the Martyr, Birmingham is a Grade II* listed Church of England parish church in the Anglican Diocese of Birmingham.[1] It is dedicated to Saint Alban, the first British Christian martyr.[2]

History[edit]

The church was constructed by John Loughborough Pearson. Work started in 1880 and the church was opened in 1881. The formal consecration took place on 4 December 1899.[3]

The patron is Keble College, Oxford.

Architecture[edit]

The reredos, and 1938 silver tabernacle

The cruciform building is in red brick, with dressings in ashlar. A square tower was added in 1938 by E F Reynolds. The interior features a stained glass east window by Henry Payne and, in the south chapel, a copper Arts and Crafts triptych with painted panels, by local artists Kate and Myra Bunce[4] and donated by them in 1919 in memory of their sisters and parents.[3]

Vicars[edit]

  • 1865 (1865)–1894 (1894) – James Samuel Pollock
  • 1895 (1895)–1896 (1896) – Thomas Benson Pollock
  • 1897 (1897)–1900 (1900) – George Philip Trevelyan
  • 1900 (1900)–1910 (1910) – Canon Alfred Cecil Scott
  • 1910 (1910)–1911 (1911) – Mark Napier Trollope
  • 1911 (1911)–1923 (1923) – Francis Underhill
  • 1923 (1923)–1953 (1953) – Dudley Clark
  • 1953 (1953)–1981 (1981) – Canon Lawrence Goodrich Harding
  • 1982 (1982)–1986 (1986) – David Handley Hutt
  • 1987 (1987)–1993 (1993) – Michael Hedley Bryant
  • 1995 (1995)–2004 (2004) – Canon James G. Pendorf

Organ[edit]

The organ dates from 1870 and was by Bryceson Son & Ellis. A specification of the organ can be found on the National Pipe Organ Register.[5]

References[edit]

  1. ^ The buildings of England. Warwickshire, Nikolaus Pevsner
  2. ^ Thurston, Herbert. "St. Alban." The Catholic Encyclopedia. Vol. 1. New York: Robert Appleton Company, 1907. 19 Feb. 2013
  3. ^ a b S. Alban and S. Patrick, Birmingham 12. St Alban's. Undated (circa 1984-1986). 
  4. ^ "1290539 - The National Heritage List for England". English Heritage. Retrieved 24 December 2013. 
  5. ^ http://www.npor.org.uk/NPORView.html?RI=N07307

External links[edit]