St Mary's Church, Barnes

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The Parish Church of St Mary, Barnes
Country United Kingdom
Denomination Church of England
Website www.stmarybarnes.org
Administration
Parish Barnes
Archdeaconry Wandsworth
Episcopal area Kingston
Diocese Southwark
Clergy
Bishop(s) Bishop of Southwark
Rector Rev. Richard Sewell
Clock

St Mary's Church, Barnes, is the parish church of Barnes, formerly in Surrey and now in the London Borough of Richmond upon Thames. It is a grade II* listed building.[1][2]

It was built of coursed flint sometime between 1100–1150. It was enlarged and re-consecrated in 1215[citation needed] after the signing of Magna Carta. It was extended to the west in the 13th century, and later to the east, creating a chancel. A west tower was added in the late 15th century. The north wall was demolished in the late 18th century to create a north aisle.

A major fire on 8 June 1978 destroyed parts of the church, but left the tower and Norman chapel almost intact. The church was restored by Edward Cullinan[3][4] with the inclusion of elements of its former structure. The north wall contains a Gothic Revival east window. The church was re-dedicated in February 1984, with the original building now named as the Langton Chapel. St Mary's Barnes is a thriving Christian community with an electoral roll of 350 and strong links across the local community. Along with the parishes of St Michael and All Angels, Barnes and Holy Trinity Barnes it forms the Barnes Team Ministry and the current Team Rector is Rev Richard Sewell.

Notable burials[edit]

  • Major General Roger Elliott (c. 1665–1714) was buried in the churchyard in May 1714.[5]
  • John Moody (c.1727–1812), actor, who lived at 11 the Terrace, Barnes, c.1780 until his death, is buried in the churchyard with his two wives.[6]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "History and Architecture". The Church Building. St Mary Barnes. Retrieved 24 August 2014. 
  2. ^ Historic England. "Church of St Mary (1358083)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 26 September 2014. 
  3. ^ Cherry, Bridget and Pevsner, Nikolaus (1983). The Buildings of England – London 2: South. London: Penguin Books. p. 468. ISBN 0 14 0710 47 7. 
  4. ^ "Local architects" (PDF). Barnes and Mortlake History Society. Retrieved 9 April 2013. 
  5. ^ "Historical and Genealogical Notes and Queries". The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography 13 (1): 99. July 1905. 
  6. ^ Brown, Maisie (1997). Barnes and Mortlake Past, with East Sheen. Historical Publications. p. 122. ISBN 0 948667 46 X. 

Bibliography[edit]

  • Official Guidebook to The Parish Church of St. Mary, Barnes

External links[edit]

Coordinates: 51°28′30″N 0°14′28″W / 51.475101°N 0.241232°W / 51.475101; -0.241232