St Mary's Church, Somers Town

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St Mary's Church, Somers Town
Church of St Mary
Country United Kingdom
Denomination Church of England
Website http://www.posp.co.uk/st-marys/
Administration
Parish Old St Pancras
Deanery South Camden
Archdeaconry Hampstead
Episcopal area Edmonton
Diocese London
Clergy
Vicar(s) Fr Paschal Worton

St Mary's Church is a Church of England church behind Euston station in Somers Town, London Borough of Camden. It was designed by Henry William Inwood as a chapel of ease for St Pancras Old Church (which resumed being a parish in its own right in 1852) and built between 1824 and 1827 by I. T. Seabrook.[1] A Parliamentary grant paid for the construction, though local taxation funded the purchases of the chapel's interior decoration and the site itself. It was consecrated on 11th Mary 1826 and soon afterwards it became famous for converting several local people from Roman Catholicism there.[2]

Early on, the chapel was known as "Mr. Judkin's Chapel" or "Seymour Street Chapel" and was attended during his schooldays by Charles Dickens, who was then living nearby with his family at 13 Cranleigh Street.[3] Augustus Pugin satirised the chapel's architecture, comparing it with Bishop Skirlaw's Chapel. The interior was the subject of two schemes, the 1874 one of J K Colling and the 1890 one of R C Reade - in the latter, traceried transoms were added to the windows and the west gallery taken out. In 1888 a chancel was added and the side galleries removed. A former parish priest at St. Mary's was Basil Jellicoe.

It was designated a Grade II listed building on 10 June 1954;[4] and remains an active church. Since 1 June 2003 it has formed part of the Old St Pancras Team Ministry (which also includes St Michael's Church, Camden Town, St Pancras Old Church and St Paul's Church, Camden Square).[5]

References[edit]

  1. ^ http://www.british-history.ac.uk/survey-london/vol24/pt4/pp118-123
  2. ^ W. E. Brown, St. Pancras book of dates, 1908.
  3. ^ T. F. Bumpus, London churches ancient and modern, 2nd ser., p. 103.
  4. ^ Historic England. "Details from listed building database (477270)". Images of England.  accessed 22 January 2009
  5. ^ http://www.saintmichaelcamden.250x.com/

Coordinates: 51°31′53″N 0°8′5″W / 51.53139°N 0.13472°W / 51.53139; -0.13472