St Michael's Church, Baddiley

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St Michael's Church, Baddiley
St Michael's Church, Baddiley, from the southeast
St Michael's Church, Baddiley is located in Cheshire
St Michael's Church, Baddiley
St Michael's Church, Baddiley
Location in Cheshire
Coordinates: 53°02′56″N 2°35′26″W / 53.0489°N 2.5905°W / 53.0489; -2.5905
OS grid reference SJ 604 502
Location Baddiley, Cheshire
Country England
Denomination Anglican
Website St Michael's Baddiley
History
Founded 1308
Dedication Saint Michael
Architecture
Status Parish church
Functional status Active
Heritage designation Grade I
Designated 12 January 1967
Architectural type Church
Style Gothic
Groundbreaking 1308
Completed 1811
Specifications
Materials Chancel timber-framed with brick infill; nave timber framing encased in brick; tiled roof
Administration
Parish Baddiley, Wrenbury & Burleydam
Deanery Nantwich
Archdeaconry Macclesfield
Diocese Chester
Province York
Clergy
Vicar(s) Revd Alison Fulford
Assistant priest Revd Ruth Harrison (retired)
Laity
Churchwarden(s) Mr Ron High,
Mrs Dorothy Blackburn
Parish administrator Mrs Ros High

St Michael's Church, Baddiley is in the civil parish of Baddiley, Cheshire, England. It is designated by English Heritage as a Grade I listed building.[1] The church lies at the end of a lane near to Baddiley Hall, formerly the home of the Mainwaring family.[2][3] It dates from the early 14th century. The nave and chancel are divided by a pre-Reformation screen and tympanum. The church is one of a 'handful' of timber-framed churches remaining in the country.[4] It continues to be an active Anglican parish church in the diocese of Chester, the archdeaconry of Macclesfield and the deanery of Nantwich. Its benefice is combined with those of St Mary's and St Michael's Church, Burleydam and St Margaret's Church, Wrenbury.[5]

History[edit]

The church dates from 1308.[1] In 1811 the nave, other than the west gable, was encased in brick.[2] In 2003–2004 repairs were carried out to the timber framework, the south door and the external brickwork of the chancel.[6] The last resting place of Helen Edwards née Macfarlane; first translator from The German into English of "The Communist Manifesto"

Architecture[edit]

Exterior[edit]

The plan of the church is simple consisting of a three-bay nave and a narrower lower chancel with a vestry to its north. In the west wall is an inset porch.[7] The timber framing of the chancel is now infilled with brick which has replaced the original wattle and daub.[2] Its north and south walls feature close studding with no middle rail. In the centre of the south wall is a Gothic wooden door flanked by three-light windows. The lean-to vestry is on the north side. The east wall has a three-light window with a small trefoil window above it. The nave has three three-light windows with Gothic heads in the north and south walls. The west wall has pairs of brick pilasters flanking the porch, which contains side seats. On the apex of the gable is a louvred bell turret.[1]

Interior[edit]

The nave and chancel are divided by a pre-Reformation screen and tympanum, which is unusual in Cheshire. The screen is of plain uprights and Richards describes the tympanum as one of the most colourful of its kind in England. On it is the date 1663 and in the middle are the royal arms of Charles II above the coat of arms of the Mainwarings. On each side of these are two panels containing the Ten Commandments, the Creed and the Lord's Prayer.[2]

The nave roof is medieval and of camber beam construction. The altar rails are dated 1701. At the west end is a Georgian gallery and in the body of the church are box pews and a three decker pulpit. In the chancel is a large monument to Sir Thomas Mainwaring who died in 1726, which is decorated with putti and the family arms.[2] At gallery level are two wall panels which record the wills of benefactors who left money to the poor of the parish.[1] The parish registers begin in 1597 and the churchwardens' accounts in 1636.[2]

Present activities[edit]

Anglican services are held regularly in the church.[8][9]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d English Heritage. "Church of St Michael, Baddiley (1138586)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 27 March 2012. 
  2. ^ a b c d e f Richards, Raymond (1947), Old Cheshire Churches, London: Batsford, pp. 38–40, OCLC 719918 
  3. ^ Baddiley, Streetmap, retrieved 16 February 2011 
  4. ^ Clifton-Taylor, Alec (1974), English Parish Churches as Works of Art, London: Batsford, p. 52, ISBN 0-7134-2776-0 
  5. ^ St Michael, Baddiley, Church of England, retrieved 29 September 2009 
  6. ^ St Michael's, Baddiley, The United Benefice of Baddiley with Wrenbury and Burleydam, retrieved 4 August 2007 
  7. ^ Salter, Mark (1995), The Old Parish Churches of Cheshire, Malvern: Folly Publications, pp. 20–21, ISBN 1-871731-23-2 
  8. ^ St Michael’s Baddiley, Baddiley, Wrenbury & Burleydam churches, retrieved 6 August 2008 
  9. ^ Services, Baddiley, Wrenbury & Burleydam churches, retrieved 6 August 2008