St Nicholas of Myra's Church, Ozleworth

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St Nicholas of Myra's Church, Ozleworth
A small stone church seen from the southeast, with a central tower capped by a pyramidal roof. The chancel extends forwards and beyond the tower is the gabled south porch
St Nicholas of Myra's Church, Ozleworth, from the southeast
St Nicholas of Myra's Church, Ozleworth is located in Gloucestershire
St Nicholas of Myra's Church, Ozleworth
St Nicholas of Myra's Church, Ozleworth
Location in Gloucestershire
Coordinates: 51°38′17″N 2°17′55″W / 51.6380°N 2.2987°W / 51.6380; -2.2987
OS grid reference ST 794 932
Location Ozleworth, Gloucestershire
Country England
Denomination Anglican
Website Churches Conservation Trust
History
Dedication Saint Nicholas of Myra
Architecture
Functional status Redundant
Heritage designation Grade II*
Designated 6 September 1964
Architectural type Church
Style Norman, Gothic
Groundbreaking 12th century
Completed 1873
Specifications
Materials Stone

St Nicholas of Myra's Church, Ozleworth, is a redundant Anglican church in the village of Ozleworth, Gloucestershire, England. It has been designated by English Heritage as a Grade II* listed building,[1] and is under the care of the Churches Conservation Trust.[2] The church is unusual because it is one of only two churches in Gloucestershire with a hexagonal tower, the other being St Lawrence's Church in Swindon.[3][4]

History[edit]

The church stands in a circular churchyard, suggesting that there was an earlier church on the site, or even that the site could be pre-Christian.[2] However, there is no mention of the church in the Domesday Book.[3] The oldest part of the present church is the tower, which is Norman in style, and which may have acted as the original nave.[2] It probably dates from the 12th century.[1] During the following century a small nave was added to the west of the tower, and the chancel was added to its east side.[2] At that time the nave measured 21 feet 6 inches (6.6 m) by 13 feet 8 inches (4.2 m). In 1732 a west gallery was erected; this was approached from the outside of the church by steps and a south doorway.[3] In 1873 the church was restored by Rev W. H. Lowder.[1] At this time the nave was lengthened by 11 feet (3.4 m).[3] The church was declared redundant on 1 March 1981, and was vested in the Churches Conservation Trust on 27 October 1982.[5]

Architecture[edit]

The church is constructed in stone, with stone slate roofs.[1] At its centre is a Norman tower, the plan of which is an irregular hexagon.[2] To the east of the tower is a chancel, and to the west is a nave with a south porch. The nave now measures 33 feet (10.1 m) in length. The chancel is about 21 feet 6 inches (6.6 m) long; its width tapers from 12 feet 1 inch (3.7 m) at the western end to 11 feet 3 inches (3.4 m) at the east. The tower is divided into three stages by string courses.[3] In the top stage, in each face, is a two-light window under a round-headed arch. On the summit is a pyramidal roof. In the north and south chancel walls are two single-light windows; between those on the north side is a priest's door with a trefoil head. At the east end is a two-light window above which is a gable with a cross at its apex. The windows in the nave are similar in style to those in the chancel, and between the two windows on the north side is a blocked doorway. The south porch is opposite to this and is gabled. Its inner doorway, dating from the 13th century, has two orders and is elaborately carved.[1] Inside the church, the west tower arch is also elaborately carved. The font dates from the 13th century. In the east window are fragments of medieval stained glass, depicting a saint's head. In the southwest window of the tower are four panels of painted Flemish glass dating from the 16th or 17th century. The remainder of the stained glass is from the 19th century.[2]

External features[edit]

In the churchyard are three groups of monuments, each group comprising a Grade II listed building.[6][7][8]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e "Church of St Nicholas, Ozleworth", The National Heritage List for England (English Heritage), 2011, retrieved 20 May 2011 
  2. ^ a b c d e f Church of St Nicholas of Myra, Ozleworth, Gloucestershire, Churches Conservation Trust, retrieved 29 March 2011 
  3. ^ a b c d e Wilkinson, Rev Leonard; Overbury, Thomas; Baddeley, W. St. Clair (1926), "The Church of St. Nicholas of Myra", Transactions of the Bristol and Gloucestershire Archaeological Society 48: 355–378, retrieved 6 October 2010 
  4. ^ Simon, Barry (2004), The History of Swindon Village, Swindon Parish Council, retrieved 6 October 2010 
  5. ^ Diocese of Gloucester: All Schemes (PDF), Church Commissioners/Statistics, Church of England, 2011, pp. 3–4, retrieved 11 April 2011 
  6. ^ "Five unidentified monuments about 12 metres southeast of porch in Churchyard of Church of St Nicholas, Ozleworth", The National Heritage List for England (English Heritage), 2011, retrieved 20 May 2011 
  7. ^ "Two Worlock monuments about 3 metres south of porch in Churchyard of Church of St Nicholas, Ozleworth", The National Heritage List for England (English Heritage), 2011, retrieved 20 May 2011 
  8. ^ "Two Miller and one Fry monuments about 10 metres southwest of porch in Churchyard of Church of St Nicholas, Ozleworth", The National Heritage List for England (English Heritage), 2011, retrieved 20 May 2011 

External links[edit]