St Paul's Church, Brookhouse

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St Paul's Church, Brookhouse
St Paul's Church, Brookhouse, from the southwest
St Paul's Church, Brookhouse is located in the City of Lancaster district
St Paul's Church, Brookhouse
St Paul's Church, Brookhouse
Location in the City of Lancaster district
Coordinates: 54°04′31″N 2°42′04″W / 54.0753°N 2.7011°W / 54.0753; -2.7011
OS grid reference SD 542,646
Location Brookhouse, Caton with Littledale, Lancashire
Country England
Denomination Anglican
Website St Paul, Brookhouse
History
Founded Before 1230
Dedication Saint Paul
Architecture
Status Parish church
Functional status Active
Heritage designation Grade II*
Designated 4 October 1967
Architect(s) E. G. Paley
Architectural type Church
Style Norman, Perpendicular,
Gothic Revival
Completed 1867
Specifications
Materials Sandstone rubble, slate roof
Administration
Deanery Tunstall
Archdeaconry Lancaster
Diocese Blackburn
Province York
Clergy
Vicar(s) Revd Graham Anthony Pollitt

St Paul's Church is in the village of Brookhouse, Caton with Littledale, Lancashire, England. It is an active Anglican parish church in the deanery of Tunstall, the archdeaconry of Lancaster, and the diocese of Blackburn.[1] The church is recorded in the National Heritage List for England as a designated Grade II* listed building.[2]

History[edit]

The earliest record of a church or chapel on the site is before 1230.[3] The tower dates probably from the 16th century.[2] The rest of the church was rebuilt in 1865–67 to a design by the Lancaster architect E. G. Paley.[3] Its estimated cost was £4,000 (£320,000 in 2015).[4][5] Paley worshipped in the church, as he had a country house nearby,[6] and when his son Harry died (who succeeded his father in the architectural practice), he was buried in the churchyard.[7]

Architecture[edit]

Exterior[edit]

The church is constructed in sandstone rubble, with a slate roof. Its plan consists of a four-bay nave with a clerestory, north and south aisles, a south porch, a north transept containing the organ chamber, a chancel at a lower level, and a west tower.[2] The tower is Perpendicular in style,[3] and has three stages, diagonal buttresses, and an embattled parapet.[2] On the west side is a doorway, over which is a three-light window with Perpendicular tracery. The bell openings also have three lights. On the south side of the church is the porch, with four bays to the east. The bays are separated by buttresses and each contains a three-light window with Perpendicular tracery. To the left of the easternmost window is a priest's door. Along the clerestory are four windows. The east window has three lights with Perpendicular tracery. In the west wall of the north aisle is a blocked Norman doorway containing a tympanum carved with human figures. It is filled in with coffin lids and medieval cross slabs.[2]

Interior[edit]

The four-bay arcades are carried on octagonal piers.[2] The reredos is a copy of an Annunciation by Filippo Lippi, carved by a local artist. Its gilded frame was made by Shrigley and Hunt. Some of the stained glass is also by Shrigley and Hunt, with other windows by Abbott and Company.[3] Some of the memorials have been moved from the earlier church. The earliest of these date from 1775 and 1795, the others dating from the early and mid-19th century.[2][2] The organ was built by Conacher.[8]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

Citations

Sources