Stafford Regional Airport

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search

Coordinates: 38°23′53″N 077°27′20″W / 38.39806°N 77.45556°W / 38.39806; -77.45556

Stafford Regional Airport
StaffordRegionalAirport.jpg
IATA: noneICAO: KRMNFAA LID: RMN
Summary
Airport type Public
Owner/Operator Stafford Regional Airport Authority
Location Stafford, Virginia
Elevation AMSL 211 ft / 64 m
Runways
Direction Length Surface
ft m
15/33 5,000 1,524 Asphalt
Statistics (2004)
Aircraft operations 7,667
Source: Federal Aviation Administration[1]

Stafford Regional Airport (ICAO: KRMNFAA LID: RMN) is a public airport located three miles (5 km) southwest of the central business district of Stafford, the county seat of Stafford County, Virginia, United States.[1] The airport is southwest of the intersection of Route 630 and U.S. Route 1 near Interstate 95, approximately 40 miles (64 km) south of Washington, D.C. and 60 miles (97 km) north of Richmond. It is owned and operated by the Stafford Regional Airport Authority, an independent body of representatives from Stafford and Prince William Counties and the City of Fredericksburg.[2]

Although most U.S. airports use the same three-letter location identifier for the FAA and IATA, Stafford Regional Airport is assigned RMN by the FAA but has no designation from the IATA (which assigned RMN to Rumginae, Papua New Guinea).[3][4]

Facilities and aircraft[edit]

Stafford Regional Airport covers an area of 566 acres (229 ha) which contains one asphalt paved runway (15/33) measuring 5,000 x 100 ft (1,524 x 30 m). For the 12-month period ending December 31, 2004, the airport had 7,667 aircraft operations, an average of 21 per day: 93% general aviation and 7% military.[1]

Accidents[edit]

The airport was the site of a fatal accident on February 22, 2006, involving a Lancair Columbia 400 piloted by a private pilot.[5] The pilot and three passengers were killed when the aircraft flew into trees surrounding the runway after an aborted landing attempt via ILS.[6] Following an investigation, the NTSB cited pilot error as the most likely cause of the accident.[7]

References[edit]

External links[edit]