Lenin Peace Prize

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The back of the Lenin Peace Prize Medal

The International Lenin Peace Prize (Russian: международная Ленинская премия мира) was the Soviet Union's equivalent to the Nobel Peace Prize, named in honor of Vladimir Lenin. It was awarded by a panel appointed by the Soviet government, to notable individuals whom the panel indicated had "strengthened peace among peoples". It was founded as the International Stalin Prize for Strengthening Peace Among Peoples, but was renamed the International Lenin Prize for Strengthening Peace Among Peoples (Russian: Международная Ленинская премия «За укрепление мира между народами») as a result of destalinization. Unlike the Nobel Prize, the Lenin Peace Prize was usually awarded to several people a year rather than to just one individual. The prize was mainly awarded to prominent Communists and supporters of the Soviet Union who were not Soviet citizens. Notable recipients include: W. E. B. Du Bois, Fidel Castro, Salvador Allende, Angela Davis, and Nelson Mandela.

History[edit]

The prize was created as the International Stalin Prize for Strengthening Peace Among Peoples on December 21, 1949 by executive order of the Presidium of the Supreme Soviet in honor of Joseph Stalin's seventieth birthday (although this was after his seventy-first).

Following Nikita Khrushchev's denunciation of Stalin in 1956 during the Twentieth Party Congress, the prize was renamed on September 6 as the International Lenin Prize for Strengthening Peace Among Peoples. All previous recipients were asked to return their Stalin Prizes so they could be replaced by the renamed Lenin Prize. By a decision of Presidium of the Supreme Soviet of the USSR of December 11, 1989, the prize was renamed the International Lenin Peace Prize.[1] Two years later, after the USSR had collapsed, the Russian government, as the successor state to the defunct Soviet Union, ended the award program.

The International Lenin Prize should not be confused with the International Peace Prize, awarded by the World Peace Council. In 1941 the Soviet Union created the Stalin Prize (later renamed the USSR State Prize), which was awarded annually to accomplished Soviet writers, composers, artists and scientists.

List of recipients[edit]

1950–1955 (Stalin Prize)[edit]

Since 1957 (Lenin Prize)[edit]

1960s[edit]

1970s[edit]

1980s[edit]

1990[edit]

1. Mandela was awarded the International Lenin Peace Prize in 1990 but, due to his trial and imprisonment in South Africa, was unable to accept the prize until 2002.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "ПОСТАНОВЛЕНИЕ ПРЕЗИДИУМА ВС СССР ОТ 11.12.1989 N 905-1 О МЕЖДУНАРОДНОЙ ЛЕНИНСКОЙ ПРЕМИИ МИРА" (in Russian). 2006-10-12. 
  2. ^ a b c d e f g О присуждении международных Сталинских премий "За укрепление мира между народами" за 1950 год. Pravda. Apr 6, 1951 [1]
  3. ^ a b c d e f g Yearbook of the Great Soviet Encyclopedia (in Russian). Moscow: Sovetskaya Enciklopediya. 1959. 
  4. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t Great Soviet Encyclopedia. (in Russian) (2nd ed.). Moscow: Sovetskaya Enciklopediya. 1953. vol. 24, p. 366. 
  5. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k Great Soviet Encyclopedia. (in Russian) (3rd ed.). Moscow: Sovetskaya Enciklopediya.  In some cases in GSE's 3rd edition the year is that, "in which" the Prize was awarded, in other cases – "for which". Hence, the year "1970" there seems to be the Prize "for 1969" or "for 1968–1969"
  6. ^ a b Yearbook of the Great Soviet Encyclopedia (in Russian). Moscow: Sovetskaya Enciklopediya. 1989. 
  7. ^ a b c d e f g h i Yearbook of the Great Soviet Encyclopedia (in Russian). Moscow: Sovetskaya Enciklopediya. 1958. 
  8. ^ a b c d e f О присуждении международных Сталинских премий "За укрепление мира между народами" за 1955 год. Pravda. Dec 21, 1955, page 1 [2]
  9. ^ a b c d e Yearbook of the Great Soviet Encyclopedia (in Russian). Moscow: Sovetskaya Enciklopediya. 1960. 
  10. ^ a b c Yearbook of the Great Soviet Encyclopedia (in Russian). Moscow: Sovetskaya Enciklopediya. 1961. 
  11. ^ Yitzhak Oron, ed. (1960). Middle East Record Volume 1. 
  12. ^ a b c d e f g h Yearbook of the Great Soviet Encyclopedia (in Russian). Moscow: Sovetskaya Enciklopediya. 1962. 
  13. ^ a b c d e Yearbook of the Great Soviet Encyclopedia (in Russian). Moscow: Sovetskaya Enciklopediya. 1963. 
  14. ^ Yearbook of the Great Soviet Encyclopedia (in Russian). Moscow: Sovetskaya Enciklopediya. 1965. 
  15. ^ a b Yearbook of the Great Soviet Encyclopedia (in Russian). Moscow: Sovetskaya Enciklopediya. 1964. 
  16. ^ "Modibo Keita." Encyclopedia of World Biography, 2nd ed. 17 Vols. Gale Research, 1998.
  17. ^ a b c Yearbook of the Great Soviet Encyclopedia (in Russian). Moscow: Sovetskaya Enciklopediya. 1966. 
  18. ^ a b c d e Yearbook of the Great Soviet Encyclopedia (in Russian). Moscow: Sovetskaya Enciklopediya. 1967. p. 623. 
  19. ^ a b c d e f Yearbook of the Great Soviet Encyclopedia (in Russian). Moscow: Sovetskaya Enciklopediya. 1968. p. 622. 
  20. ^ a b c d e f Yearbook of the Great Soviet Encyclopedia (in Russian). Moscow: Sovetskaya Enciklopediya. 1969. p. 607. 
  21. ^ Shukri, Sabin M. (1984). The International Who's Who of the Arab World (2nd ed.). London: International Who's Who of the Arab World. p. 31. ISBN 978-0-9506122-1-8. 
  22. ^ a b c d e f Yearbook of the Great Soviet Encyclopedia (in Russian). Moscow: Sovetskaya Enciklopediya. 1972. p. 618. 
  23. ^ a b c d Yearbook of the Great Soviet Encyclopedia (in Russian). Moscow: Sovetskaya Enciklopediya. 1973. p. 634. 
  24. ^ a b c Yearbook of the Great Soviet Encyclopedia (in Russian). Moscow: Sovetskaya Enciklopediya. 1975. p. 653. 
  25. ^ a b c d e f g Yearbook of the Great Soviet Encyclopedia (in Russian). Moscow: Sovetskaya Enciklopediya. 1977. p. 633. 
  26. ^ a b c d e f Yearbook of the Great Soviet Encyclopedia (in Russian). Moscow: Sovetskaya Enciklopediya. 1979. p. 573. 
  27. ^ a b c d e Yearbook of the Great Soviet Encyclopedia (in Russian). Moscow: Sovetskaya Enciklopediya. 1980. p. 577. 
  28. ^ a b c d Yearbook of the Great Soviet Encyclopedia (in Russian). Moscow: Sovetskaya Enciklopediya. 1983. 
  29. ^ The Evening Independent, October 27, 1981
  30. ^ a b c d e f Yearbook of the Great Soviet Encyclopedia (in Russian). Moscow: Sovetskaya Enciklopediya. 1985. p. 571. 
  31. ^ a b c d e Yearbook of the Great Soviet Encyclopedia (in Russian). Moscow: Sovetskaya Enciklopediya. 1987. p. 599. 
  32. ^ Daily Times, January 30th 2008
  33. ^ The Great Encyclopedic Dictionary (in Russian). Moscow: Sovetskaya Enciklopediya. 1991. vol. 1, p. 759. 

External links[edit]