Stan Veit

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Stan Veit (25 December 1919 - 29 July 2010[1]) was an entrepreneur and publisher who played an important role in the early days of the personal computer industry in the United States. He ran "Computer Mart," the first computer store in New York City, was the personal computer editor of Popular Electronics Magazine, and then Editor-in-Chief of Computer Shopper. He published his reminiscences about the early history of the personal computer industry in a 1993 book called Stan Veit's History of the Personal Computer.

Biography[edit]

Early life[edit]

Veit studied at Brooklyn Polytech, RCA Institutes, Hofstra College, and received a bachelors degree in education from New School University. He served in the U.S Army Air Corps in World War II. He then worked as a technical writer for a number of defense contractors.

Career[edit]

In 1976 he opened Computer Mart of New York. This was one of the first computer stores in the world. It sold computers from Imsai, Sphere Computers, South West Technical Products, and Apple Computer, among others. It was in fact only the third Apple dealer appointed by Steve Jobs.[2] Between 1976 and 1979, he was involved with most of the pioneers in the computer industry, including Steve Jobs, Charles Tandy, and Les Solomon,[3] with whom he co-authored the book Getting Involved With Your Own Computer.

Veit then became a writer and editor, publishing Using Microcomputers In Business, The Peripherals Book, and articles for Personal Computing and Byte magazines. In 1980, he became the Computer Editor of Popular Electronics Magazine and later Technical Editor of Computers & Electronics magazine for Ziff Davis. He also became Sysop of Ziff Davis' first online magazine on CompuServe.[2]

In 1983 he become the founding Editor-In-Chief of Computer Shopper magazine and later Editor-In-Chief and Publisher.[2]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Stanley Veit Obituary". Florida Today. August 15, 2010. Retrieved 13 August 2013. 
  2. ^ a b c History of Computing Project
  3. ^ Stan Veit's History of the Personal Computer, 1993

External links[edit]