Standard-bearer

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A standard-bearer is a person (soldier or civilian) who bears an emblem called an ensign or standard, i.e. either a type of flag or an inflexible but mobile image, which is used (and often honoured) as a formal, visual symbol of a state, prince, military unit, etc.

This can either be an occasional duty, often seen as an honour (especially on parade), or a permanent charge (also on the battlefield); the second type has even led in certain cases to this task being reflected in official rank titles such as Ensign and Cornet.

Many terms exist, often specifying the type of standard borne (in various cases named in parentheses after the bearer).

In antiquity[edit]

Pre-hellenistic[edit]

  • Pharaonic nome-emblems (many also the name of such province)

Hellenistic, Roman and Byzantine[edit]

  • Aetos
  • Aquilifer (Aquila)
  • Bandifer (Bandum)
  • Discens aquilifer(or)um, - signiferorum : trainee
  • Draconarius (Draco, 'dragon) - one of them could be selected Optio Draconarius; ... Bearcus Draconarius ...
  • Imaginifer (Imago) ?5 original images : Aper = boar, Equus = horse, Minotaur(us), Tabula ansata: winged boar, Taurus = bull ...
  • Ornithoboros
  • Semaforus < Semaphoros (Semion?)
  • Signifer (Signum) - one of them could be selected as Signifer princeps
  • Tablifer - guards cavalry (?Tabula ansata : winged boar)
  • Vexillifer (Vexillum)

Cfr. also :

  • Adiutor signorum
  • Aedes
  • Antesignanus
  • Aquilae natalis
  • Deposita ad signa
  • Labarum
  • Postsignanus
  • Vexillatio

Olympic[edit]

Team USA marches in the parade of athletes around BC Place stadium during the Opening Ceremony of the XXI Olympic Winter Games, February 12, 2010, in Vancouver. The athlete standard-bearer is Mark Grimmette

Feudal[edit]

Ottoman[edit]

Modern[edit]