Stanislaw Wygodzki

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Stanisław Wygodzki (Polish pronunciation: [staˈɲiswaf vɨˈɡɔd͡zkʲi]) (January 13, 1907, Będzin, Poland – May 9, 1992, Tel Aviv, Israel) was a Polish writer of Jewish origin.

He published his first volume of poetry in 1933 before the Nazi occupation of Poland, during which Wygodzki was first interred in the Bedzin ghetto and later in the concentration camps of Auschwitz, Dachau, Oranienburg and Sachsenhausen. His health impacted by his experiences, Wygodzki did not resume publishing until 1947, following which he became a successful writer, publishing poetry, short stories and one novel. Wygodzki, who lost his wife, daughter and parents in Auschwitz, was one of four winners of the 1969 "Remembrance Award", awarded annually by the World Federation of Bergen-Belsen Associations for "excellence in literature on the Nazi atrocities against European Jewry".[1] A communist in his youth who was briefly imprisoned in Poland as an adult for his communist activities, Wygodzki resettled in Israel in 1968 in response to antisemitism in the Communist Party in Poland.

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  1. ^ Staff (February 25, 1969) "Holocaust Books receive honors; 4 who wrote on atrocities by Nazis win awards". The New York Times. P. 40.

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