Stanley Cowell

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Stanley Cowell
Stanley Cowell.jpg
Stanley Cowell playing with The Heath Brothers in Rockefeller Center, June 1977
Background information
Born (1941-05-05)May 5, 1941
Toledo, Ohio,  United States
Genres Jazz
Instruments Piano
Associated acts Roland Kirk, Marion Brown, Charles Tolliver, Max Roach ...

Stanley Cowell (born May 5, 1941 in Toledo, Ohio) is an American jazz pianist and co-founder of the Strata-East Records label. He played with Roland Kirk while studying at the Oberlin Conservatory of Music, and later with Marion Brown, Max Roach, Bobby Hutcherson, Clifford Jordan, Harold Land, Sonny Rollins and Stan Getz.[1] Cowell played with trumpeter Charles Moore and others in the Detroit Artist's Workshop Jazz Ensemble in 1965-66. During the late 1980s Cowell was part of a regular quartet led by J.J. Johnson.[2] Cowell teaches in the Music Department of the Mason Gross School of the Arts at Rutgers, the State University of New Jersey.

Discography[edit]

As leader[edit]

Freedom Records
  • 1969: Blues for the Viet Cong (also released as Travellin' Man on Black Lion Records)
  • 1969: Brilliant Circles
ECM Records
Strata-East Records
  • 1974: Musa: Ancestral Streams
  • 1975: Regeneration
Galaxy Records
  • 1977: Waiting for the Moment
  • 1978: Equipoise
  • 1978: Talkin' 'bout Love
  • 1981: New World
SteepleChase Records
  • 1989: Sienna
  • 1993: Angel Eyes
  • 1994: Departure 2
  • 1994: Games
  • 1995: Setup
  • 1995: Bright Passion
  • 1995: Mandara Blossoms
  • 1995: Live
  • 1997: Hear Me One
  • 2012: It's Time
  • 2013: Welcome to This New World
DIW Records
  • 1987: We Three
  • 1990: Close to You Alone
Other labels

As sideman[edit]

With Marion Brown

With Richard Davis

With Jimmy Heath

With The Heath Brothers

With Stan Getz

With Johnny Griffin

With Bobby Hutcherson

With Clifford Jordan

With Art Pepper

With Max Roach

With Charles Tolliver

References[edit]

  1. ^ Fairweather, Digby; Ian Carr; Brian Priestley (2004). The Rough Guide to Jazz. p. 286. 
  2. ^ Yanow, Scott. Bebop. p. 92. 

External links[edit]