Stanley E. Porter

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Stanley E. Porter (born 1956) is an American academic specializing in New Testament studies and the grammar of Koine Greek.

He studied at Point Loma College, San Diego, (B.A.), Claremont Graduate School, Claremont, California (M.A.) Trinity Evangelical Divinity School, Deerfield, Illinois (M.A.) and earned his Ph.D. at the University of Sheffield 1988.[1] From 1994 he was Professor of Theology and Head of the Department of Theology and Religious Studies at Roehampton University, London. He is currently president, dean and professor of New Testament at McMaster Divinity College in Hamilton, Ontario,[2] and senior editor of Journal of Greco-Roman Christianity and Judaism.[3]

He is particularly noted for his works on verbal aspect in New Testament Greek. He is a proponent for Greek verbal aspect being regarded as a major semantic category in the analysis and exegesis of Greek texts, recognising three aspects: perfective, imperfective and stative.[4] However he also is known for an approach that recognises the common Hellenistic heritage of many so-called semitic verb aspect uses in the New Testament, except where reference to the Septuagint is clear.[5]

Works[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Mcmaster.ca staff bio
  2. ^ IVP author biographical sketch
  3. ^ "Journal of Greco-Roman Christianity and Judaism". Retrieved 26 October 2013. 
  4. ^ Constantine Campbell Basics of Verbal Aspect in Biblical Greek 2008
  5. ^ Chang-Wook Jung The original language of the Lukan infancy narrative 2004 Page 21 "Rejecting the argument for Semitic intervention upon the verbal aspect of NT Greek, Porter argues that only some examples of enhancement (which, according to Porter, points to the frequent occurrence of a construction that is rare in Greek, but increasingly used under the influence of Semitic literature) occur in Luke's writings."