Star of the West (Bahá'í magazine)

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The Star of the West was a Bahá'í periodical which began publication on March 21, 1910 and ended publication under this title in March 1935.[1]

A precursor to Star of the West was a publication named The Bahai Bulletin published in New York City from 1908 for eight months ending early in 1909. In early 1910, Bahá'ís from Chicago and New York consulted and the New York Board of Counsel (a precursor of a Bahá'í Local Spiritual Assembly) decided not to revive the Bahai Bulletin and telegraphed Albert Windust to proceed with the magazine.[1]

Star of the West began life as Bahai News on March 21, 1910. Its editors were Albert Windust and Gertrude Buikema. It was about three by six inches and nine pages long. A sepia photograph of Mírzá Mihdí was glued onto the first page of its inaugural issue.[1]

Others involved with its publication over its history were Albert and Emily Vail, Dr. Zia Bagdadi, Ahmad Sohrab, Edna M. True; with Horace Holley and Stanwood Cobb being singled out as early contributors.[1]

The publication continued to bear the name "Star of the West" until November 1922, a year after the passing of 'Abdu'l-Bahá, when that name became a subtitle under the smaller type heading of The Bahai Magazine. In April 1931, the subtitle "Star of the West" disappeared altogether from the printed version. The name re-appeared on the spines of annual hardbound volumes.[1] The magazine World Order replaced Star of the West (reflecting a change oriented toward acquiring a more broad readership than when the publication was first issued).[1]

The periodical featured translations of some Tablets of 'Abdu'l-Bahá and writings from Shoghi Effendi along with sharing news of the Bahá'í world.

The text was mostly in English, but also often offered a Persian language section with its own content.

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f Troxel, Duane K. "An Introduction to Sifter - Star of the West". bahai-education.org. Retrieved 2011-11-30. 

External links[edit]