Starfire (comics)

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For the swordswoman superheroine, see Starfire (DC Comics).
Not to be confused with Firestar.
Starfire (Koriand'r)
Cover to Tales of the New Teen Titans #4 (September 1982). Art by George Pérez.
Publication information
Publisher DC Comics
First appearance DC Comics Presents #26 (October 1980)
Created by Marv Wolfman
George Pérez
In-story information
Alter ego Koriand'r
Species Tamaranean
Place of origin Tamaran
Team affiliations Teen Titans
Outsiders
Justice League
R.E.B.E.L.S.
Red Hood and the Outlaws
Partnerships Nightwing
Red Hood
Arsenal
Notable aliases Kory Anders
Abilities Superhuman strength, stamina, endurance, and durability
Supersonic flight
Energy projection (colored bright green)
Starbolt beams
Starbolt waves
Starbolt blasts
Starbolt bursts
Starbolt eye beams
Linguistic assimilation
Radiation Resistance
Survival in the vacuum of space
Hand-to-hand combatant
Cold immunity

Starfire is the name of a fictional comic book character published by DC Comics. The most prominent Starfire is Koriand'r, the fourth character to use that name. She debuted in a preview story inserted within DC Comics Presents #26 (October 1980) and was created by Marv Wolfman and George Pérez. In 2013, Starfire placed 21st on IGN's Top 25 Heroes of DC Comics.[1] She was ranked 20th in Comics Buyer's Guide's "100 Sexiest Women in Comics" list.[2]

Publication history[edit]

The design of the character (Koriand'r) incorporated aspects of many existing characters, artist George Pérez talking about the creation of the character noted that:

...I figured based on the description, was Red Sonja in outer space, so she ended up having a visual cue from that. When Joe Orlando passed by and saw the character sketches he suggested that maybe her hair should be longer. That I took to the ninth degree and gave her the Mighty Mouse contrail.[3]

Fictional character biography[edit]

Koriand'r, Starfire's given name, is a princess of the fictional planet Tamaran in the Vegan system, and was in line to rule the planet as Queen. Komand'r ("commander", also known as Blackfire), her older sister, developed a bitter rivalry with her after suffering a disease in infancy that robbed her of the ability to harness solar energy to allow her to fly, and by extension, her right to the throne. This rivalry continued and intensified when the siblings were sent for warrior training with the Warlords of Okaara. Things came to a head during a sparring exercise in which Komand'r attempted to kill her sister. As a result, Komand'r was expelled and she swore vengeance.

That revenge came in a plot where Komand'r betrayed her planet by supplying detailed information about Tamaran's defenses to their enemies, the Citadel. They conquered Tamaran with ease, and the surrender conditions included the enslavement of Koriand'r, who was never permitted to return, since that would mean the Citadel would devastate the planet for abrogating the treaty. To Kory's horror, she learned that Komand'r was her master; Koriand'r's older sister made the most of her sibling's years of horrific servitude. When Koriand'r killed one of her captors, Komand'r decided to execute her as punishment, but the sisters were attacked and captured by the Psions. Psions, a group of sadistic alien scientists, performed a deadly experiment on both sisters to see how much energy their Tamaranean bodies could absorb before exploding from the overload. During the procedure, Komand'r's forces attacked the Psion ship to retrieve her. While the Psions were distracted, Koriand'r broke free using her starbolts - destructive blasts of solar energy - which were a result of the experimentation. Against her better judgment, she decided to free Komand'r, who was still absorbing energy. However, far from grateful, Komand'r struck her sister down with the same, but more intense, power, and had her restrained for later execution.

Koriand'r escaped by stealing a spacecraft to flee to the nearest planet, Earth, where she met the first Robin and his compatriots; she joined them in forming the Teen Titans. She became a charter member of this team and remained a member for years; during this time she was frequently romantically involved with Robin.

Marriage[edit]

Koriand'r has been married twice, both times to Tamaranean men: once to the Prince Karras to seal a peace treaty; and once to General Phy'zzon out of love. Karras died in battle, while Phy'zzon died trying to defend new Tamaran against the Sun Eater.

In between these, she nearly married Dick Grayson, but their wedding was interrupted by Raven (who was evil at the time). Raven murdered the priest before he could pronounce Dick and Koriand'r husband and wife. The relationship was already on unsteady ground, with Koriand'r fearing that Dick was rushing into marriage and also concerned about the anti-alien sentiments that sprang up in response to the news of the impending nuptials.

In the Titans of Tomorrow storyline, Batwoman said that Starfire would have a wonderful future with Nightwing. The half-blood Mar'i Grayson was born from their union in the Kingdom Come timeline. However, during Infinite Crisis, an image from the Titans Tomorrow timeline shows a gravestone implied to belong to a deceased Dick Grayson.[4]

Infinite Crisis[edit]

Main article: Infinite Crisis

During Infinite Crisis, Starfire joined Donna's New Cronus Team that went to investigate a hole in the universe that was found during the Rann-Thanagar War. They arrived at the reset center of the universe and with the help of assorted heroes aided in the defeat of Alexander Luthor, who was attempting to recreate the multiverse and build a perfect Earth from it. She is reported missing at the end of the crisis.

52[edit]

Main article: 52 (comics)

On the seventh day of the fifth week of 52, Starfire is shown to be stranded on a paradise-like planet with Animal Man and Adam Strange. In the same issue, it was revealed that energy ripples caused by Alexander Luthor, Jr., altered the Zeta Ray Beams the space heroes were going to use to return home; among other things, it caused the trio to be teleported together to the planet.

A week and some time later, Starfire is seen eating an odd narcotic native fruit. Luckily, Adam's tough love seems to snap her out of it, or at least make her stop eating the fruit. Two days later, Devilance, a being whose presence Buddy had sensed earlier, appears to Starfire. A week, two days, and two nights later, Adam and Buddy go looking for her. Unfortunately, they find her caught in a large net, hanging from above. Just as Buddy realizes it is a trap, he and Adam get caught in a similar net, with Devilance staring at them. Three days and two nights later, Starfire awakens and works together with her comrades to distract Devilance. She pays Devilance back for capturing her by stealing his staff and striking him with it before catching up with Buddy and Adam. As the trio head back to the ship, hoping to use the staff as a power source, Devilance broods, bound by the same vines he had used to restrain his captives.

At the end of week 16, the repairs on the ship are completed and the trio take off for Earth. Devilance later suddenly attacks the ship and takes back his lance. Just as Devilance is about to destroy the ship, he is torn apart by Lobo. Believing he is going to attack them next, Starfire convinces Lobo to help the trio by offering payment, but not before he rips her top off. She returns to the ship to explain the situation to her companions while Lobo hitches the ship to his space bike. They follow Lobo in his new stronghold in Sector 3500, a sector of space mysteriously ravaged, and ruled by Lobo acting as religious man. To save him, and the inhabitants, from a swarm of strange creatures, Starfire is forced to use the Emerald Eye of Ekron, alerting Ekron himself. The ragtag team is then forced to flee, with Lobo acting as their guide, gaining Ekron's help and discovering their real enemy, Lady Styx, bringing havoc and mayhem in the entire Galaxy. Starfire agrees to fight her, and she is brought as a prisoner of the galactic villainess by Lobo, in an attempt to foil her defences. The attempt succeeds, but Buddy is seemingly killed, and Lobo leaves.

Starfire and Adam are left alone in space, their ship slowly breaking apart, still pursued by angry Lady Styx followers. Starfire is badly injured, and a blind Adam Strange, who is reliant on machinery which is no longer useful, cannot do anything to help her. Just as they are going to crash into a sun, however, Mogo and a rookie Green Lantern come to their rescue. Cured, but still recovering, she travels to Earth in order to return Buddy's jacket back to his wife Ellen, unaware that Buddy was resurrected and arrived on Earth shortly before her. Upon her return, she manages to destroy two of Lady Styx's followers who were attacking Buddy and his wife. She then returns Buddy's jacket to his wife, before passing out from exhaustion and is left in the care of the Baker Family.

Countdown to Adventure[edit]

Starfire, Adam Strange, and Animal Man are fated to join forces again in the coming Countdown to Adventure eight-issue miniseries.[5] In issue one of the series, Starfire discovers her powers have gone but decides to make an attempt at a normal life. Buddy invites her to stay with the family as an after-school sitter despite Ellen's discomfort with how close Buddy and Starfire seem. This worsens when Buddy's son attacks Kory whilst under the effects of Lady Styx's virus. Animal Man's decision to follow Starfire rather than watch over his son in the hospital leads Ellen to ask if he is in love with her, to which Buddy does not reply. Despite the loss of her powers, Starfire demonstrates her combat abilities as she and Animal Man fight off crowds of people infected by the virus.

They are later trapped in San Diego with the infectees where they are joined by the Teen Titans who are trying to break through a force field to get to the Healers ship. After Buddy is captured, Ellen joins Starfire to save Animal Man from dissection. They are then interrupted by more victims of the Lady Styx virus. Alanna and Adam Strange arrive at the scene via the Zeta Beam and meet up with Starfire and Ellen Baker. They then save Buddy and teleport with the aid of the Zeta Beam to Rann to restore Starfire's powers. After being teleported to Rann, Starfire recharges her powers and rids Rann of the Lady Styx virus.

The team finds out that the sterilization is taking place in San Diego. Starfire uses her powers to heal the people, and is later seen leaving the Baker household for parts unknown. Starfire, Animal Man, Ellen, and Adam Strange are teleported by a broken Zeta Beam to Earth. Starfire attempts to rid the disease but is soon tackled by Champ Hazard into the ground. Adam Strange blasts Champ off Kory and she cures San Diego of the Lady Styx virus. She then leaves the Baker's household to return to the Titans.

Rann-Thanagar Holy War[edit]

Main article: Rann-Thanagar War

The trio again join forces in the Rann-Thanagar Holy war. After a meeting at Titans Tower, Adam Strange Zeta Beams Starfire and Animal Man to Rann. Apparently the belief of Lady Styx still remained even after the virus has been eliminated. Their plan is to use a telepath to show the horror of Lady Styx.

Titans Together[edit]

After the apparent defeat of Lady Styx, Starfire once again returned to Animal Man's home. One afternoon, she and Animal Man's son were attacked by a water demon in Buddy's swimming pool. Meanwhile, her old Titan teammates had also been attacked by assorted demonic entities. This led to Starfire, Nightwing, Troia, Cyborg, Beast Boy, Raven, Kid Flash, and Red Arrow, to reassemble as a team, when they realized that the attacks are the result of a resurrected Trigon and his newly discovered three sons. While investigating, the Titans began to experience unexplained mood-shifts. Starfire and Nightwing were overwhelmed by lust, and ended up having abrupt sex in the middle of their investigation.

Soon after, the team met up in New York's Central Park, where they attempted to recover from these mood-shifts and realize that each shift coincided with one of the seven deadly sins. The team was then approached by the Sons of Trigon. They battled the villainous prodigy, and drove them away. Starfire and Nightwing then discuss their actions while under the influence of Trigon's sons. While Nightwing shows hints at wanting to renew their relationship, Starfire questions his commitment to the relationship and goes so far as to ask Nightwing whether or not he truly still loves her. Nightwing to his own surprise and reluctance admits he does not, leading to them for now leaving their reunion in doubt.

Most recently, she has been captured and turned into a Justifier, as seen in Final Crisis: Resist. She has since been freed, although the loss of control she gathered from the Justifier helmet distressed her severely. She was more than happy to destroy a warehouse full of them when Mister Terrific offered her and Cyborg to destroy them.

Blackest Night[edit]

During Hero's Day, a time when the heroes of the DC Universe join together in remembrance of dead comrades, Starfire and the Titans were attacked by Black Lantern versions of their fallen teammates.[volume & issue needed] During the battle, Starfire and Cyborg were subjected to a psychic attack by the Black Lantern Omen, putting them both in a euphoric state as they experienced their greatest desires (for Starfire, marrying Dick Grayson). Both she and Cyborg were rescued by Beast Boy.[volume & issue needed]

Justice League & R.E.B.E.L.S.[edit]

Following the dissolution of the current JLA after Blackest Night, Starfire is invited by Donna to join Kimiyo Hoshi's new Justice League.[6] After a short time with the team, Starfire quit the team and left a note to Dick explaining why. She then returns to where Tamaran used to be, to find that it had mysteriously returned. It is REVEAL that Vril Dox of Legion has moved the planet Rann where Tamaran used to be. Starfire agrees to join Legion and enters into a relationship with Captain Comet. Soon Tamaranean refugees, led by Blackfire, attack Rann believing that since the planet was in Tamaran's orbit they had claim to it. The violence was ended when Vril Dox, who was off-world at the start of the conflict, arrived with Thanagarian warships and stopped the fighting without bloodshed on either side. The tension between the Rannians and the Tamaraneans was resolved by allowing the Tamaraneans to live on Rann's uninhabited southern continent. Although her relationship with Comet was only physical for her, Comet thought different thus ending their relationship. She also assisted the Green Lantern Corp in battling Psions. Starfire helped create an alliance between Rannians, Tamaraneans and L.E.G.I.O.N. after defeating Starro the Conqueror, ensuring security for Rann, the Vega System and the galaxy.[7]

Red Hood and the Outlaws[edit]

Starfire in The New 52: Red Hood and the Outlaws #1

In The New 52 universe, it is uncertain how much of her previous history remains intact, although she seems to have a similar origin, including her membership to a group similar to the Teen Titans and her past relationship with Dick Grayson. However, one notable detail has changed; she was sold into slavery by her sister to save Tamaran from the Citadel. Another is that her ship, which is crashed on a beautiful tropical island, appears to be her main home, where she keeps a number of articles of Dick Grayson's clothing.[8] Starfire has joined with Jason Todd, who is once again using the Red Hood identity, and Roy Harper, who retakes the mantle of Arsenal.[9]

Starfire explains that Tamaraneans are said to have a short attention span when it comes to "all things Earth", seeing humans as little more than sensory experiences. Aliens of all sorts, but especially Tamaraneans, are hunted after on Earth as a man called Crux finds a picture of her, then attacks her and attempts to drain her powers away.[10][11] Starfire, at first, seemingly no longer remembers the Teen Titans when asked about them, however, it's later shown that she does retain her memories and recalls Dick Grayson and Roy's full name. Her sexual desires are brought up very casually when she offhandedly offers Harper a chance to sleep with her.[10] Later, it is shown that Starfire lied about her species' characteristics for personal reasons, and that her race in fact processes romantic feelings very deeply.[12]

After she is attacked by Crux, it's revealed she was experimented on to some measure by The Citadel, which allowed her to retain her power through unconventional means after being hit with technology designed to drain her powers.[13] Afterward, she became a couple with Roy Harper, accepting an offer to go to dinner and sleeping together again.[14] It's soon revealed that Koriand'r is Commander of a Spaceship named Starfire. She finds out that Tamaran have been taken over by The Blight, a parasitic alien race.[15] She talks to Roy and Jason in private and explains that she and Komand'r, her sister, were always not on the best of terms, though they tried. This is mainly because Kori blames her sister and the people of Tamaran for her enslavement, so she is torn on if she should help them now. Roy is then kidnapped during an attack on the ship and taken to Tamaran, driving Star to go to her home planet.[16]

Later, Roy discovers that Starfire has been lying. Due to the deep way her race processes emotions, she remembers all her lovers but chooses to suppress those memories, including those of Dick Grayson.[12] Roy breaks up with her after this, reasoning that while she may have her reasons, his own issues with trust demand that she be honest with him.[17]

Controversy[edit]

In his review of Red Hood and the Outlaws, Jesse Schedeen of IGN.com notes that Kenneth Rocafort's pencilling affords Scott Lobdell the opportunity to emphasize Starfire's sex appeal: "She alone seems to have been completely rebooted for the relaunch. Lobdell's decision to write her as being more cold and hostile is fine, but he does over-emphasize her sexuality a bit. Yes, Starfire is meant to be a sexually liberated character, but in a more positive way than shown here."[18]

An additional review of the comic's first issue has indicated further criticism by Mathew Peterson of MajorSpoilers.com, stating "juvenile treatment of sexual matters here renders one of the main characters into nothing more than a punchline, and in a book with only three characters, that’s unforgivable,"[19] referring specifically to its sexualized portrayal of Starfire as a "'perfect-10 love doll imaginary girlfriend'".[19] Andrew Hunsaker of Craveonline.com notes that story writer Lobdell's take on Tamaraneans (Starfire's race) "reduce(s) Princess Koriand'r... into essentially a highly advanced Real Doll...(C)omplete with installing a lack of memory of anything related to humanity."[20] Hunsaker further opines that it "seems as if Lobdell has taken great pains to strip all the emotional motivation behind Kori's gregarious outlook and reduce her to nothing more than a sex vessel. It's pretty insulting not only to women, but to male intelligence to boot."[20] Hunsaker concludes that it "makes you want to punch the entire comic book industry."[20]

Laura Hudson, editor-in-chief of ComicsAlliance, notes that "There's a difference between writing a female character as sexually liberated, and writing her as wish-fulfillment sex object, but Starfire sure is making a case for the latter in (a) charmless scene"[21] wherein Starfire defends her offer to have sex with Arsenal by noting that "love has nothing to do with it".[10] Hudson further notes in a later article that portrayals of women as sexual objects "don't support sexually liberated women; they undermine them".[22] Hudson also notes "If you really want to support Starfire's 'liberated sexuality' like she's somehow a person with real agency, what people should really be campaigning for is more half-clothed dudes in suggestive poses to get drawn around her, since I'm sure that's what she'd like to see. But people don't really want that, do they? Because it's not about what Starfire wants. It's about what straight male readers want. And they want to see Starfire with her clothes falling off."[22]

Abilities and powers[edit]

Starfire is a Tamaranean and as such, her physiology is designed to constantly absorb ultraviolet radiation. The radiation is then converted to pure energy, allowing her to fly at supersonic speeds. Originally, Starfire was capable of using this power to fly in space. However, it is established in Red Hood and the Outlaws #2 and #27 that the rebooted Starfire is unable to fly without the effects of gravity, leaving her unable to travel in space unaided. This energy also gives her incredible superhuman strength and durability. This strength, combined with her fighting skills, allowed her to defeat the much stronger Donna Troy about two out of three times during purely hand to hand matches.[23] She later proved strong enough to fight against Wonder Woman for a short period of time and, during a fit of rage, was so strong that Donna Troy was unable to restrain her without the help of Mon-El. After being experimented on by the alien Psions, Starfire gained the ability to release her absorbed energy into incredibly powerful pink-colored blasts called "starbolts."[volume & issue needed] As shown in the "Insiders" crossover story arc (Teen Titans and Outsiders),[volume & issue needed] Starfire can also release nearly all of her stored energy as a powerful omni-directional explosive burst, many times stronger and more powerful than her standard blasts. The released energy leaves her in a weakened state.[volume & issue needed] Starfire also demonstrated more control over her powers in the New 52 reboot, having used her internal energy to melt the metal of Jason Todd's gun when it came into contact with her skin. Starfire, and all Tamaraneans, are capable of assimilating languages through physical contact with another person. When Starfire attempts to do so with a male, she typically does so by kissing because it is "more fun" for her. Starfire is also proficient in hand to hand combat, having been trained by the Warlords of Okaara.

Other versions[edit]

In other media[edit]

Television[edit]

Teen Titans[edit]

Starfire in the original Teen Titans animated series (2003-2006)

Starfire appears in the Teen Titans animated series, voiced by Hynden Walch. Elements of her storyline appear in different episodes spread across the show's five seasons, in which she deals with her archenemy and elder sister, Blackfire (also voiced by Walch), the duties and responsibilities of being a princess and future queen of her home world, and her insecurities about being an extraterrestrial being on Earth.

Starfire was born and raised on the distant planet Tamaran before arriving on Earth and joining the Teen Titans. Her race, the Tamaranians, are an emotional and feelingly alien race who see feelings and emotions as the supernatural life-force that drives their very livelihood. Their feelings and emotions greatly strengthen and energize their natural abilities of faster-than-light flight (which does not produce a contrail), superhuman durability, endurance,strength, agility, reflexes, as well as Starfire's bright green-colored energy blasts called starbolts. Her race is also highly resilient to radiation and the cold (though the longer she is outside, and the more exhausted she is, the more susceptible she is to sub-zero temperatures). Boundless confidence greatly magnifies and enhances her superhuman strength while her starbolts are fueled by righteous fury. Unbridled joy sends her soaring among the clouds. Righteous fury knocks out the criminals. The animated Starfire also has the ability to travel faster-than-light without a ship, as well as the ability to survive in the vacuum of outer space for long periods of time. However, she can't breathe underwater. Sometimes her extremely strong Tamaranean abilities act beyond her control, such as releasing explosive bright green-colored energy blasts whenever she sneezes, as well as her superhuman strength accidentally bending a street light down to the ground. She can absorb knowledge of basic spoken tongues and languages through lip contact.

Starfire's Titans character bears some similarities with her comic book version. In the flashback episode "Go!", which tells of the founding of the Titans in their animated continuity, just before meeting the Titans, Starfire is shown being held prisoner as a "prize" by a group of Gordanian slave masters, working for an interstellar power known as the Citadel. Eventually, she manages to escape and flees to the closest planet, which happens to be Earth. Starfire runs into Robin and the other soon-to-be Titans, but after being mistreated for so long, she is aggressive, antagonistic and does not trust the Titans or any one else for that matter. After Robin aids her in taking off the "space cuffs" that bind her wrists, the Gordanians whom she escaped from show up looking for her and the Titans help her fight them off. After winning and driving off her jailers, Starfire elects to stay on Earth with the four heroes and quickly develops genuinely pure and strong romantic feelings for Robin.

As the show was geared towards a young demographic, her personality is changed drastically from the comics. In sharp contrast to her forceful and hot-tempered counterpart, this kid-friendly version Starfire is naive, innocent, and somewhat insecure, but it is this trait that endears her to others, especially to Robin. This makes her inherently the most sensitive of the Titans.[27] An alien and an outsider, she is still new to Earth and its customs, which serves as a recurring source of comic relief. She also insists on sharing her own customs with other members of the team. Presumably because English is not her first language, Starfire speaks without contractions and misuses idioms. Additionally, she uses several Tamaranean nouns.

Starfire has a pet giant moth larva named "Silkie" in the series, given to her by Beast Boy. Starfire takes friendship very seriously, and is easily distressed when others, especially her best friends, argue or fight. Although her naive and slightly overly friendly yet kind nature can sometimes clash with Raven's more secretive one, she has shown a close bond to her.

Reflecting the comic books, the series hints at a potential relationship between Starfire and Robin. At the Teen Titans panel at Comicon 2005 in San Diego, Sam Register asked story editor Rob Hoegee if Robin and Starfire would ever kiss. "We know they are going to kiss," Rob replied.[28] In the season 5 episode "Go!", Robin and Starfire's first kiss is shown; however (as in the comics), this was for the purpose of assimilating the English language. In the movie Teen Titans: Trouble in Tokyo, romantic moments are shared between the two. Finally, Robin and Starfire share their actual romantic kiss after Brushogun is defeated.

  • In Teen Titans Go! #46 (a comic book spin-off from the TV series), it is revealed that Starfire has a younger brother named Wildfire. When the Gordanians had attacked Tamaran, her parents set up a ship to save him by launching him to another planet, thus saving the Tamaranean royal family bloodline. Afterwards, Blackfire, in an attempt to make a treaty between the Tamaranians and Gordanians, gives them Starfire as a slave (setting up her appearance in the episode "Go!"). As a result of Starfire and Wildfire's absence, their parents had tragically died of a broken heart. Wildfire seemingly comes to Earth to meet up with his second eldest sister, but he is revealed to be the shapeshifting Madame Rouge, who was aided in the deception by Blackfire. Discovering this, a furious and heartbroken Starfire closes off all sisterly ties with Blackfire (stating that they are no longer sisters), and vows that she will find her long-lost younger brother, as he is the only family she has left.

New Teen Titans[edit]

Starfire returns in the New Teen Titans shorts, with Hynden Walch reprising her role. In one short, she kisses a Spanish boy to learn Spanish, just like how she kissed a Japanese boy to learn Japanese in Teen Titans: Trouble in Tokyo. This causes Robin to be jealous and learn French to impress her. When he shows her his amazing French skills, she kisses him on the lips.

Teen Titans Go![edit]

Starfire returns in Teen Titans Go!, with Hynden Walch reprising her role. The creators do the same thing as they did in the original in which Robin and Starfire do like and care about each other very much, but just won't admit it with just a few differences. In The Date, she goes on a romantic date with Speedy, possibly a reference to her blooming romantic relationship with Roy in Red Hood and the Outlaws. A jealous Robin though crashes the date, causing Starfire to be furious with him and leaves with the disembodied voice in Robin's head. In this version, Starfire is shown getting angrier more often. Her rage and fury releases a huge barrage of unusually strong and destructive bright green starbolt energy blasts that cause quite a lot of damage and pain to her enemies

Film[edit]

  • Starfire appears in the Teen Titans animated series adaption film Teen Titans: Trouble in Tokyo, with Hynden Walch reprising her role. In the film, romantic moments are shared between Robin and Starfire. Finally, the two share their actual romantic kiss after Brushogun is defeated.
  • Starfire appears in Superman/Batman: Public Enemies as part of Lex Luthor's force of government-employed superheroes. Although Jennifer Hale receives voice credit, Starfire does not have any lines, the only thing she actually "says" are the vocal effects she makes when Superman punches her. Her appearance in this film is much like her comic-counterpart.

Toys[edit]

Video games[edit]

Other Starfires[edit]

Red Star[edit]

Main article: Red Star (comics)

The original DC Comics character to use the name Starfire was Leonid Kovar, a Russian national that first appeared in (Teen Titans #18, December 1968). After his second appearance (New Teen Titans #18, April 1982) he changed his name to "Red Star" in acknowledgment of Koriand'r's appropriation of the title.

Starfire[edit]

The second DC Comics character to use the name Starfire was a foe of Supergirl, who first appeared in Adventure Comics #402 (February 1971). She created a pill that frequently negated Supergirl's powers for several months, causing the Girl of Steel to wear an exo-skeleton that simulated many of her normal abilities. She has not been seen post-Crisis.

Sornaii Champion[edit]

Main article: Starfire (DC Comics)

The third DC Comics character to use the name Starfire was a dark haired woman. The character's series first appeared in 1976, running for 8 issues and took place on a strange alien world called Pytharia.

References[edit]

  1. ^ http://www.ign.com/articles/2013/11/19/the-top-25-heroes-of-dc-comics
  2. ^ Frankenhoff, Brent (2011). Comics Buyer's Guide Presents: 100 Sexiest Women in Comics. Krause Publications. p. 21. ISBN 1-4402-2988-0. 
  3. ^ Nolen-Weathington, Eric; George Pérez. Modern Masters, Volume 2: George Pérez. TwoMorrows Publishing. p. 128. ISBN 978-1-893905-25-2. 
  4. ^ Teen Titans (vol. 3) #33 (April 2006)
  5. ^ "Countdown to Adventure Launches in August". Newsarama. May 14, 2007. 
  6. ^ Justice League of America (vol. 2) #41 (January 2010)
  7. ^ Justice League of America (vol. 2) #43 (March 2010)
  8. ^ Red Hood and the Outlaws Vol 1 #6
  9. ^ http://dcu.blog.dccomics.com/new-52-red-hood-and-the-outlaws/ DC Universe: The Source - Red Hood and the Outlaws Preview
  10. ^ a b c Lobdell, Scott (2011). Red Hood and the Outlaws #1. New York: DC Comics. 
  11. ^ Red Hood and the Outlaws Vol. 1 #4
  12. ^ a b Red Hood and the Outlaws #20 (July 2013)
  13. ^ Red Hood and the Outlaws Vol.1 #5
  14. ^ Red Hood and the Outlaws Vol.1 #7
  15. ^ Red Hood and the Outlaws Vol.1 #10
  16. ^ Red Hood and the Outlaws Vol.1 #11
  17. ^ Red Hood and the Outlaws Annual #2 (July 2013)
  18. ^ Schedeen, Jesse. "Red Hood and the Outlaws #1 Review Jason Todd assembles his own team of rogue heroes.". Comics/Reviews. IGN.com. Retrieved 24 October 2011. 
  19. ^ a b Peterson, Matthew. ""New 52" Review". Reviews. MajorSpoilers.com. Retrieved 24 October 2011. 
  20. ^ a b c Hunsacker, Andrew. "New 52 Review: Red Hood and the Outlaws #1". Comics/Reviews. Craveonline.com. Retrieved 24 October 2011. 
  21. ^ Hudson, Laura. "Parting Shot: DC's New Starfire, WTF". Opinion. ComicsAlliance.com. Retrieved 24 October 2011. 
  22. ^ a b Hudson, Laura. "The Big Sexy Problem with Superheroines and Their 'Liberated Sexuality'". Opinion. ComicsAlliance.com. Retrieved 24 October 2011. 
  23. ^ Winick, Judd (2005). Outsiders #25 Part 4. Los Angeles, CA: DC COMICS. p. 25. 
  24. ^ X-Patrol #1 (April 1996)
  25. ^ Flashpoint: Deadman and the Flying Graysons #2 (July 2011)
  26. ^ Flashpoint: Deadman and the Flying Graysons #3 (August 2011)
  27. ^ "Teen Titans Characters: Starfire". Titans Tower. [dead link]
  28. ^ "San Diego ComicCon 2005: Teen Titans Live". Titans Tower. 

External links[edit]