Washington State Route 16

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State Route 16 marker

State Route 16
SR 16 is highlighted in red.
Route information
Defined by RCW 47.17.065
Maintained by WSDOT
Length: 27.16 mi[2] (43.71 km)
Existed: 1964[1] – present
Major junctions
East end: I‑5 in Tacoma
  SR 302 in Purdy
SR 160 in Port Orchard
West end: SR 3 in Gorst
Location
Counties: Pierce, Kitsap
Highway system
SR 14 SR 17

State Route 16 (SR 16) is a 27.16-mile-long (43.71 km) state highway in the U.S. state of Washington, connecting Pierce and Kitsap counties. The highway, signed as east–west, begins at an interchange with Interstate 5 (I-5) in Tacoma and travels through the city as a freeway towards the Tacoma Narrows. SR 16 crosses the narrows onto the Kitsap Peninsula on the partially tolled Tacoma Narrows Bridge and continues through Gig Harbor and Port Orchard before the freeway ends in Gorst. The designation ends at an intersection with SR 3 southwest of the beginning of its freeway through Bremerton and Poulsbo. SR 16 is designated as a Strategic Highway Network (STRAHNET) corridor within the National Highway System as the main thoroughfare connecting Tacoma to Naval Base Kitsap and a part of the Highways of Statewide Significance program.

SR 16 was created during the 1964 state highway renumbering as the successor to Primary State Highway 14 (PSH 14). PSH 14, which had itself been the successor to State Road 14, traveled northeast from Shelton to Gorst and south to Gig Harbor. PSH 14 was extended over the Tacoma Narrows in 1939 on the unfinished Tacoma Narrows Bridge, which would later collapse months after opening in 1940, into Tacoma over Secondary State Highway 14C (SSH 14C). SR 16 has been expanded into a freeway in stages beginning with the original Nalley Valley Viaduct in Tacoma in 1971, and ending with the opening of an interchange near Port Orchard in 2009. Future improvements to the corridor include the installation of high-occupancy vehicle lanes that connect to I-5 and the rest of the freeway network in Pierce County, scheduled for completion by 2022.

Route description[edit]

SR 16 traveling onto the Kitsap Peninsula on the twin Tacoma Narrows Bridge

SR 16 begins on the Nalley Valley Viaduct in Tacoma at an interchange with I-5 between the Tacoma Mall and Downtown.[3][4] The freeway travels northwest over the Sound Transit Sounder commuter train to a semi-directional T interchange with Sprague Avenue,[5][6] where it begins paralleling the Scott Pierson Trail.[7] SR 16 continues west past a diamond interchange with Union Avenue and an interchange with Center Street at Cheney Stadium towards the Skyline neighborhood of North Tacoma.[8][9][10] The freeway travels around Tacoma Community College past partial cloverleaf interchanges with 19th Street and Pearl Street,[11][12] the latter being signed as SR 163 as it heads north into Ruston and towards Vashon Island.[13] SR 16 continues west past a partial cloverleaf interchange with Jackson Avenue and towards the Tacoma Narrows on the twin-suspension Tacoma Narrows Bridges.[2][14][15] The 5,979-foot-long (1,822 m) westbound span and the tolled 5,400-foot-long (1,600 m) eastbound span combine to carry six lanes of SR 16 onto the Kitsap Peninsula.[16][17] The eastbound span is tolled via electronic toll collection through the Good To Go! program on the Kitsap Peninsula side of the bridge. Tolls for two passengers and/or a motorcycle are set at $4 for Good To Go! accounts and $5 collected at the toll plaza, with prices increasing for each additional passenger by $2 for Good To Go! accounts and by $2.50 for non-Good To Go! users.[18][19]

SR 16 continues onto the Kitsap Peninsula and intersects 24th Street in a partial diamond interchange east of the Tacoma Narrows Airport as it passes the toll plaza for the eastbound Tacoma Narrows Bridge.[20][21] The freeway travels northwest through Gig Harbor past interchanges with Olympic Drive and Wollochet Drive near Gig Harbor High School before it reaches Henderson Bay.[22][23] SR 16 continues through an interchange with Burnham Drive and past the Washington Corrections Center for Women and St. Anthony Hospital towards Purdy,[24][25][26] intersecting the southern terminus of SR 302.[27] The freeway bypasses Purdy and Peninsula High School to the east before intersecting SR 302 Spur and entering Kitsap County.[28][29][30] SR 16 passes the community of Burley and intersects its main access highway, Burley-Olalla Road, in an interchange before entering the city of Port Orchard.[31][32] The freeway ends after serving as the western terminus of SR 160 and SR 166 on the west side of the city.[33][34][35] The four-lane highway continues west along the Sinclair Inlet into Gorst,[36][37] intersecting its spur route and ending at an intersection with SR 3.[38]

Every year, the Washington State Department of Transportation (WSDOT) conducts a series of surveys on its highways in the state to measure traffic volume. This is expressed in terms of average annual daily traffic (AADT), which is a measure of traffic volume for any average day of the year. In 2012, WSDOT calculated that the busiest section of SR 16 was west of its interchange with Union Avenue in downtown Tacoma, serving 112,000 vehicles, while the least busiest section is after the SR 160 interchange west of Port Orchard, serving 32,000 vehicles.[39] SR 16 is designated as a STRAHNET corridor, connecting Naval Base Kitsap to the state highway system along with SR 3, within the National Highway System that classifies it as important to the national economy, defense, and mobility.[40][41] WSDOT designates the entire route of SR 16 as a Highway of Statewide Significance,[42] which includes highways that connect major communities in the state of Washington.[43]

History[edit]

The current westbound (left) and now-demolished eastbound (right) portions of the Nalley Valley Viaduct, carrying SR 16 through Tacoma.

The present route of SR 16 roughly follows the route of several state highways signed during the 20th century, the first of which was State Road 14. State Road 14 traveled north from Shelton to Gorst and south into Gig Harbor as the primary connector between the Olympic and Kitsap peninsulas.[44] State Road 14 was re-designated in 1937 as PSH 14 and included a secondary highway named SSH 14C that traveled from Gig Harbor to the Tacoma Narrows, site of an under-construction suspension bridge to open in 1940.[45][46][47] PSH 14 was extended southeast over SSH 14C and the unfinished Tacoma Narrows Bridge into the city of Tacoma as part of a transfer of bridge ownership to the state of Washington in 1939.[48] After the collapse of the original bridge on November 7, 1940,[49] PSH 14 was truncated to Gig Harbor and traffic was redirected to a ferry landing in Manchester.[50] The second Tacoma Narrows Bridge was opened on October 14, 1950, and PSH 14 was extended the following year to an intersection with U.S. Route 99 (US 99) in Downtown Tacoma.[51][52]

PSH 14 was replaced by SR 16 under the sign route system created during the 1964 state highway renumbering, traveling from US 99 in Tacoma to SR 3 in Gorst.[1][53] WSDOT began converting the SR 16 corridor to a controlled-access freeway with the construction of the Nalley Valley Viaduct in 1969, designed with tetrapod columns at a cost of $3.67 million.[54] The viaduct opened in 1971 and connected SR 16 to I-5 in Tacoma, part of a new freeway replacing Bantz Boulevard between I-5 and the Tacoma Narrows Bridge.[54][55][56] A bypass of Purdy on the PierceKitsap county line was opened in 1977 and the former route of SR 16 was divided between SR 302 and its spur route.[57] The remainder of SR 16 in Port Orchard was upgraded to a freeway during the 1980s;[58] however, an at-grade intersection remained at Burley-Olalla Road until a diamond interchange was completed in 2009.[59]

WSDOT has been installing high-occupancy vehicle lanes (HOV lanes) on SR 16 as part of a Pierce County HOV system, scheduled for completion by 2022.[60] Beginning in the early 2000s, frontage roads and the Scott Pierson Trail were built along the freeway and sound walls were erected near residential areas in Tacoma.[7][61] From Tacoma to Gig Harbor, WSDOT began installing exit numbers to interchanges with SR 16 that correspond to its milepost.[62] The Nalley Valley Viaduct was replaced by a new westbound structure in 2011, carrying all four lanes of SR 16 towards I-5 in Tacoma, while the original viaduct was closed and demolished.[63][64] The eastbound Nalley Valley Viaduct began construction in November 2011 and is scheduled to be completed by WSDOT in 2014, with the westbound viaduct being widened to its full planned width.[65][66]

Tacoma Narrows Bridge[edit]

The original Tacoma Narrows Bridge, also known by its nickname of "Galloping Gertie", during its opening on July 1, 1940.
Main article: Tacoma Narrows Bridge

The Tacoma Narrows Bridge, which carries SR 16 across the Tacoma Narrows between Tacoma and the Kitsap Peninsula, was first proposed by locals during the late 19th century and credited to local rancher John G. Shindler while traveling through the Narrows by steamboat in 1888.[47] The Northern Pacific Railway planned to build a trestle bridge over the Narrows to connect its western terminus in Tacoma to the proposed Puget Sound Naval Shipyard in Port Orchard.[47] The Washington State Legislature, after extensive lobbying by local auto groups and businesses, authorized the construction of a road bridge over the Narrows in February 1929.[47] The Washington Toll Bridge Authority was created in March 1937 to construct and maintain toll bridges throughout the state, beginning with the Tacoma Narrows Bridge from Tacoma to Gig Harbor and the Lake Washington Floating Bridge from Seattle to Mercer Island.[67]

The bridge, designed by American suspension bridge engineer Leon Moisseiff, began construction on November 23, 1938, by the Pacific-General-Columbia Company, a partnership between three companies that received a $2.88 million grant from the Public Works Administration and a $3.52 million loan from the Reconstruction Finance Corporation, to be repaid through tolls.[68] The Tacoma Narrows Bridge opened on July 1, 1940, and included ceremonies attended by an estimated 10,000 people, including Governor of Washington Clarence D. Martin. The 2,800-foot-long (850 m) bridge, christened the name "Galloping Gertie" by its construction workers, cost $6.4 million to build and became the third longest suspension span in the world after its completion.[69][70] The following day, the art deco MV Kalakala was chosen to make the commemorative final ferry crossing of the Tacoma Narrows.[71] The original toll for the bridge cost 55 cents per car, 15 cents per extra passenger, and 15 cents for pedestrians.[70] The bridge, which was prone to movement during windstorms, collapsed at proximately 11:00 am on November 7, 1940, because of winds in excess of 42 miles per hour (68 km/h).[72] The only fatality during the collapse was a dog trapped in a car belonging to local reporter Leonard Coatsworth of Tacoma.[49]

A second, 5,979-foot-long (1,822 m) Tacoma Narrows Bridge was constructed between 1948 and 1951,[17] officially opening to traffic on October 14, 1950. The bridge was designed to let wind pass through the structure with perforated girders and open grating in the deck.[52] Traffic on the two-lane bridge began increasing from 6,000 vehicles in 1960 to nearly 67,000 vehicles by 1990, according to WSDOT AADT data.[52][73][74] The increased traffic prompted the Washington State Legislature to approve the construction of a tolled eastbound bridge in 1999, to be finished during the early 2000s.[75] The 5,400-foot-long (1,600 m) eastbound bridge was constructed between 2002 and 2007,[16][76] opening on July 15, 2007, during ceremonies attended by 60,000 people, including Governor Christine Gregoire.[77][78] The newer eastbound bridge provided the debut for the Good To Go! RFID pass from WSDOT, which allows frequent users to bypass the toll booths by way of a prepaid transponder placed on the inside of the windshield and reducing the toll.[79]

Bannered routes[edit]

Spur route[edit]


State Route 16 Spur
Location: Gorst, Washington
Length: 0.39 mi[2] (0.63 km)
Existed: 1988–present[80]

SR 16 has a 0.39-mile-long (0.63 km) spur route located in Gorst that travels west from SR 16 to southbound SR 3.[2][38] The spur route was added to the state highway system in 1988 after SR 16 was re-aligned to avoid traffic signals in Gorst.[80] WSDOT included the road in its annual AADT survey in 2012 and calculated that between 4,100 and 8,600 vehicles used the spur route.[39]

Alternate route[edit]


State Route 16 Alternate
Location: Tacoma Narrows Bridge
Length: 0.68 mi[2] (1.09 km)
Existed: 2007–present[81]

SR 16 has a 0.68-mile-long (1.09 km) alternate route serving the eastbound toll plaza of the Tacoma Narrows Bridge in Pierce County.[2][20] The alternate route was added to the state highway system in 2007 after the completion of the eastbound Tacoma Narrows Bridge on July 15.[77][81] WSDOT included the road in its annual AADT survey in 2012 and calculated that 9,100 vehicles used the alternate route.[39]

Exit list[edit]

County Location Mile[2] km Exit Destinations Notes
Pierce Tacoma 0.00 0.00 I‑5 to I‑705 – Seattle, Portland, City Center Southern terminus
0.56 0.90 1A Sprague Avenue
1.31 2.11 1B Union Avenue
2.10 3.38 1C Center Street – Fircrest Westbound exit and eastbound entrance
2.66 4.28 2 South 19th Street, Orchard Street
3.80 6.12 3 SR 163 north (Pearl Street) / 6th Avenue – Ruston Southern terminus of SR 163
4.82 7.76 4 Jackson Avenue, 6th Avenue – University Place
Tacoma Narrows 5.20–
6.33
8.37–
10.19
Tacoma Narrows Bridge
  6.69 10.77 8 24th Street – Tacoma Narrows Airport No eastbound exit
  6.74 10.85
SR 16 Alt. / Toll plaza
Eastbound exit and eastbound entrance only
  7.57 12.18 9 36th Street – Tacoma Narrows Airport Eastbound exit and eastbound entrance only
Gig Harbor 8.66 13.94 10 Olympic Drive
9.93 15.98   Wollochet Drive Northwest – City Center
12.78 20.57   Burnham Drive
13.68 22.02   SR 302 west – Purdy, Key Center Westbound exit and eastbound entrance only; eastern terminus of SR 302
Kitsap   15.96 25.69  
SR 302 Spur south to SR 302 west – Purdy, Key Center, Shelton
Westbound entrance and eastbound exit only; northern terminus of SR 302 Spur
  18.03 29.02 20 Burley-Olalla Road
  20.54 33.06   Mullenix Road
Port Orchard 23.06 37.11   SR 160 east (Sedgwick Road) – Southworth Ferry Western terminus of SR 160
24.62 39.62   Old Clifton Road, Tremont Street
  26.13 42.05   SR 166 east – Port Orchard Westbound entrance and eastbound exit; western terminus of SR 166
West end of freeway
Gorst 26.71 42.99  
SR 16 Spur to SR 3 south – Belfair, Shelton
Eastern terminus of SR 16 Spur
27.16 43.71   SR 3 north – Bremerton, Poulsbo Northern terminus
1.000 mi = 1.609 km; 1.000 km = 0.621 mi

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "47.17.065: State route No. 16". Revised Code of Washington. Washington State Legislature. 1970; revised 1973, 1987. Retrieved March 18, 2013. 
  2. ^ a b c d e f g Staff (2012). "State Highway Log: Planning Report 2012, SR 2 to SR 971" (PDF). Washington State Department of Transportation. pp. 473–485. Retrieved March 18, 2013. 
  3. ^ "Feature Detail Report for: Tacoma". Geographic Names Information System. United States Geological Survey. September 10, 1979. Retrieved March 18, 2013. 
  4. ^ "SR 5 - Exit 132A: Junction SR 16/South 36th Street" (PDF). Washington State Department of Transportation. May 3, 2012. Retrieved March 18, 2013. 
  5. ^ Microsoft, Sound Transit. Bing Maps – Lakewood-Seattle (Map). Cartography by Nokia. http://www.soundtransit.org/Schedules/Sounder-Lakewood-Seattle?tab=Map. Retrieved March 18, 2013.
  6. ^ "SR 16: Junction Sprague Avenue" (PDF). Washington State Department of Transportation. May 3, 2012. Retrieved March 18, 2013. 
  7. ^ a b Washington State Department of Transportation (PDF). Welcome to the Scott Pierson Trail (Map). http://www.wsdot.wa.gov/NR/rdonlyres/CDCE16E9-059F-41E7-8FF0-4E44DF71861F/0/scottpierson.pdf. Retrieved March 18, 2013.
  8. ^ "SR 16 - Exit 1B: Junction Union Avenue" (PDF). Washington State Department of Transportation. May 3, 2012. Retrieved March 18, 2013. 
  9. ^ "SR 16 - Exit 1C: Junction Center Street/Tyler Street" (PDF). Washington State Department of Transportation. September 4, 2008. Retrieved March 18, 2013. 
  10. ^ "Feature Detail Report for: Cheney Stadium". Geographic Names Information System. United States Geological Survey. September 10, 1979. Retrieved March 18, 2013. 
  11. ^ "Feature Detail Report for: Tacoma Community College". Geographic Names Information System. United States Geological Survey. May 1, 1992. Retrieved March 18, 2013. 
  12. ^ "SR 16 - Exit 2A/2B: Junction South 19th Street/Orchard Street" (PDF). Washington State Department of Transportation. March 25, 2011. Retrieved March 18, 2013. 
  13. ^ "SR 16 - Exit 3: Junction SR 163/Pearl Street/6th Avenue" (PDF). Washington State Department of Transportation. July 13, 2009. Retrieved March 18, 2013. 
  14. ^ "SR 16 - Exit 4: Junction Jackson Avenue" (PDF). Washington State Department of Transportation. September 4, 2008. Retrieved March 18, 2013. 
  15. ^ Google Inc. "State Route 16". Google Maps (Map). Cartography by Google, Inc. https://maps.google.com/maps?saddr=Unknown+road&daddr=Unknown+road&hl=en&ll=47.379865,-122.580265&spn=0.497495,1.352692&sll=47.527177,-122.698982&sspn=0.001938,0.005284&geocode=FYGt0AIdL2az-A%3BFUM31QIdLsGv-A&mra=me&mrsp=1,0&sz=18&t=m&z=10. Retrieved March 18, 2013.
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  17. ^ a b "The Bridge Machine Since 1950". Washington State Department of Transportation. 2005. Retrieved March 18, 2013. 
  18. ^ "Tacoma Narrows Bridge Tolling". Washington State Department of Transportation. Retrieved March 18, 2013. 
  19. ^ "Toll Rates: SR 16 Tacoma Narrows Bridge". Washington State Department of Transportation. Retrieved March 18, 2013. 
  20. ^ a b "SR 16 - Exit 8: Junction 24th Street NW" (PDF). Washington State Department of Transportation. September 4, 2008. Retrieved March 18, 2013. 
  21. ^ "Feature Detail Report for: Tacoma Narrows Airport". Geographic Names Information System. United States Geological Survey. March 1, 1990. Retrieved March 18, 2013. 
  22. ^ "Feature Detail Report for: Gig Harbor". Geographic Names Information System. United States Geological Survey. September 10, 1979. Retrieved March 18, 2013. 
  23. ^ "Feature Detail Report for: Gig Harbor High School". Geographic Names Information System. United States Geological Survey. March 1, 1993. Retrieved March 18, 2013. 
  24. ^ "SR 16: Junction Burnham Drive NW/Borgen Boulevard NW" (PDF). Washington State Department of Transportation. October 18, 2011. Retrieved March 18, 2013. 
  25. ^ "Feature Detail Report for: Washington Corrections Center for Women". Geographic Names Information System. United States Geological Survey. February 14, 2013. Retrieved March 18, 2013. 
  26. ^ "Feature Detail Report for: Saint Anthony Hospital". Geographic Names Information System. United States Geological Survey. February 3, 2011. Retrieved March 18, 2013. 
  27. ^ "SR 16: Junction SR 302/SR 302 Spur Purdy" (PDF). Washington State Department of Transportation. January 27, 2009. Retrieved March 18, 2013. 
  28. ^ "Feature Detail Report for: Purdy". Geographic Names Information System. United States Geological Survey. September 10, 1979. Retrieved March 18, 2013. 
  29. ^ "Feature Detail Report for: Peninsula High School". Geographic Names Information System. United States Geological Survey. September 10, 1979. Retrieved March 18, 2013. 
  30. ^ "SR 16: Junction SR 302 Spur Purdy" (PDF). Washington State Department of Transportation. December 17, 2009. Retrieved March 18, 2013. 
  31. ^ "Feature Detail Report for: Burley". Geographic Names Information System. United States Geological Survey. September 10, 1979. Retrieved March 18, 2013. 
  32. ^ "SR 16 - Exit 20: Junction SE Burley-Olalla Road" (PDF). Washington State Department of Transportation. February 7, 2011. Retrieved March 18, 2013. 
  33. ^ "SR 16: Junction SR 160/Sedgewick Road" (PDF). Washington State Department of Transportation. January 27, 2010. Retrieved March 18, 2013. 
  34. ^ "SR 16: Junction SR 166 (Formerly SR 160)" (PDF). Washington State Department of Transportation. September 17, 2004. Retrieved March 18, 2013. 
  35. ^ "Feature Detail Report for: Port Orchard". Geographic Names Information System. United States Geological Survey. September 10, 1979. Retrieved March 18, 2013. 
  36. ^ "Feature Detail Report for: Sinclair Inlet". Geographic Names Information System. United States Geological Survey. September 10, 1979. Retrieved March 18, 2013. 
  37. ^ "Feature Detail Report for: Gorst". Geographic Names Information System. United States Geological Survey. September 10, 1979. Retrieved March 18, 2013. 
  38. ^ a b "SR 3: Junction SR 16/SR 16 Spur Gorst" (PDF). Washington State Department of Transportation. February 28, 2011. Retrieved March 18, 2013. 
  39. ^ a b c Staff (2012). "2012 Annual Traffic Report" (PDF). Washington State Department of Transportation. pp. 93–9. Retrieved March 24, 2013. 
  40. ^ Federal Highway Administration (October 1, 2012). National Highway System: Washington (Map). http://www.fhwa.dot.gov/planning/national_highway_system/nhs_maps/washington/wa_washington.pdf. Retrieved March 18, 2013.
  41. ^ "What is the National Highway System?". Federal Highway Administration. September 26, 2012. Retrieved March 18, 2013. 
  42. ^ "Transportation Commission List of Highways of Statewide Significance". Washington State Transportation Commission. July 26, 2009. Retrieved March 18, 2013. 
  43. ^ Lorenzo, Judy. "Highways of Statewide Significance". Washington State Department of Transportation. Retrieved March 18, 2013. 
  44. ^ Washington State Legislature (March 19, 1923). "Chapter 185: Primary and Secondary State Highways". Session Laws of the State of Washington. Session Laws of the State of Washington (1923 ed.). Olympia, Washington: Washington State Legislature. p. 631. Retrieved March 23, 2013. "A primary state highway, to be known as State Road No. 14 or the Navy Yard Highway, is established as follows: Beginning at a junction with State Road No. 9, at the most feasible point between Shelton and Potlatch in Mason County; thence by the most feasible route through Union City and Clifton to Charleston in Kitsap County; also from a junction near Tidewater Creek in Kitsap County through Port Orchard, to Gig Harbor in Pierce County; also from a junction near Port Orchard by the most feasible route to the ferry landing at Harper." 
  45. ^ Washington State Legislature (March 17, 1937). "Chapter 190: Establishment of Primary State Highways". Session Laws of the State of Washington. Session Laws of the State of Washington (1937 ed.). Olympia, Washington: Washington State Legislature. p. 940. Retrieved March 23, 2013. "A primary state highway to be known as Primary State Highway No. 14, or the Navy Yard Highway, is hereby established according to description as follows: Beginning at a junction with Primary State Highway No. 9, in the vicinity north of Shelton, thence in a northeasterly direction by the most feasible route by way of Port Orchard, thence in a southerly direction by the most feasible route to Gig Harbor; also beginning in the vicinity of Port Orchard on Primary State Highway No. 14, as herein described, thence in an easterly direction by the most feasible route to the ferry landing at Harper." 
  46. ^ Washington State Legislature (March 18, 1937). "Chapter 207: Classification of Public Highways". Session Laws of the State of Washington. Session Laws of the State of Washington (1937 ed.). Olympia, Washington: Washington State Legislature. p. 1010. Retrieved March 23, 2013. "Secondary State Highway No. 14C; beginning at Gig Harbor on Primary State Highway No. 14, thence in a southerly direction to the shore of Puget Sound." 
  47. ^ a b c d "Spanning Time: A Chronology of Tacoma Narrows Bridges History". Washington State Department of Transportation. 2005. Retrieved March 23, 2013. 
  48. ^ Washington State Legislature (January 27, 1939). "Chapter 5: Lake Washington and Narrows Bridges". Session Laws of the State of Washington. Session Laws of the State of Washington (1939 ed.). Olympia, Washington: Washington State Legislature. p. 10. Retrieved March 23, 2013. "That section 14 of chapter 190, Session Laws of 1937, be and the same is hereby amended to read as follows: Section 14. A primary state highway to be known as Primary State Highway No. 14, or the Navy Yard Highway, is hereby established according to description as follows: Beginning at a junction with Primary State Highway No. 9, in the vicinity north of Shelton, thence in a northeasterly direction by the most feasible route by way of Port Orchard, thence in a southerly direction by the most feasible route to the Tacoma Narrows bridge, thence crossing the Tacoma Narrows bridge to the easterly end thereof in the city of Tacoma" 
  49. ^ a b Long, Priscilla (January 13, 2003). "Tacoma Narrows Bridge collapses on November 7, 1940.". HistoryLink. Retrieved March 23, 2013. 
  50. ^ Washington State Legislature (March 22, 1949). "Chapter 225: Establishing of Primary and Secondary State Highways". Session Laws of the State of Washington. Session Laws of the State of Washington (1949 ed.). Olympia, Washington: Washington State Legislature. pp. 773–774. Retrieved March 23, 2013. "A primary state highway to be known as Primary State Highway No. 14, or the Navy Yard Highway, is hereby established according to description as follows: Beginning at a junction with Primary State Highway No. 9, in the vicinity north of Shelton, thence in a northeasterly direction by the most feasible route by way of Port Orchard, thence in a southerly direction by the most feasible route to Gig Harbor; also beginning in the vicinity of Port Orchard on Primary State Highway No. 14, as herein described, thence in an easterly direction by the most feasible route to the ferry landing at Harper; also from a junction in the vicinity of Colby to the ferry landing at Manchester." 
  51. ^ Washington State Legislature (1951). "Chapter 8". Session Laws of the State of Washington. Session Laws of the State of Washington (1951 ed.). Olympia, Washington: Washington State Legislature. 
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  54. ^ a b "SR 16 - Westbound Nalley Valley - History". Washington State Department of Transportation. Retrieved March 23, 2013. 
  55. ^ "Before Highway 16, traffic crawled on Bantz Blvd.". The News Tribune. August 5, 2001. 
  56. ^ United States Geological Survey (1965) (JPG). Seattle, 1965 (Map). 1:250,000. http://www.lib.utexas.edu/maps/topo/250k/txu-pclmaps-topo-us-seattle-1965.jpg. Retrieved March 23, 2013.
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  80. ^ a b Staff (1988). "1988 Annual Traffic Report" (PDF). Washington State Department of Transportation. p. 48. Retrieved March 24, 2013. 
  81. ^ a b Staff (2007). "State Highway Log: Planning Report 2007, SR 2 to SR 971" (PDF). Washington State Department of Transportation. pp. 473–485. Retrieved March 18, 2013. 

External links[edit]

Route map: Google / Bing