Washington State Route 529

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State Route 529 marker

State Route 529
Yellow Ribbon Highway
SR 529 is highlighted in red.
Route information
Defined by RCW 47.17.752
Maintained by WSDOT
Length: 7.88 mi[2] (12.68 km)
Existed: 1971[1] – present
Major junctions
South end: I‑5 in Everett
  US 2 in Everett

SR 529 Spur in Everett
I‑5 near Marysville
North end: SR 528 in Marysville
Highway system
SR 528 SR 530

State Route 529 (SR 529, officially the Yellow Ribbon Highway) is a Washington state highway that connects the cities of Everett and Marysville. The 7.88-mile-long (12.68 km) roadway extends north from an interchange with Interstate 5 (I-5), numbered exit 193, past the western terminus of U.S. Route 2 (US 2), its spur route, Downtown Everett and Naval Station Everett to cross the Snohomish River onto Smith Island. After crossing the Steamboat Slough, the road encounters an interchange with I-5, numbered exit 198, before crossing the Ebey Slough and entering Marysville. In Marysville, SR 529 ends at SR 528. Before being realigned in 1991, SR 529 started at exit 192 of I-5 and traveled north as Broadway through Downtown Everett to Marysville.

A map published in 1895 of the Snohomish area showed the current and former routes in Everett already complete. By 1898, citizens of both Everett and Marysville were interested in a road that would traverse the Snohomish River delta. A 1911 map of the Mount Vernon area showed the route in Marysville, but the bridges between Everett and Marysville were railroad bridges. The roads were combined with other highways to form the Pacific Highway in 1913, which became State Road 1 in 1923 and US 99 in 1926, but the cutoff actually opened in 1927. State Road 1 became Primary State Highway 1 (PSH 1) in 1937 and PSH 1 became US 99 in 1964. After US 99 was decommissioned, SR 529 was established in 1971. Naval Station Everett was opened in 1991 and SR 529 was realigned on Everett Avenue and Marine View Drive to serve the new naval base. The former route of the highway, now named Broadway, had an interchange with I-5 that was reconstructed between 2005 and 2008 to include high-occupancy vehicle (HOV) lanes and now includes a single-point urban interchange with 41st Street.

Route description[edit]

Everett Avenue (SR 529) at the Hoyt Avenue intersection, the Everett Public Library, listed on the National Register of Historic Places, is headquartered there.

State Route 529 (SR 529) begins at an interchange, numbered exit 193, with Interstate 5 (I-5) and Pacific Avenue in Everett. The interchange only has two ramps, an offramp from I-5 northbound to SR 529 and a metered on-ramp from SR 529 to I-5 southbound.[3] From the interchange, the highway travels west as Pacific Avenue and north as Maple Street to intersect two streets that are the westernmost segments of U.S. Route 2 (US 2), Hewitt Avenue and California Street.

Southbound SR 529 traveling towards Naval Station Everett, paralleling a BNSF Railway-owned route.

The roadway serves as the western terminus of US 2 and turns west to become Everett Avenue, which continues east to I-5 as SR 529 Spur.[3] Everett Avenue then travels west through Downtown Everett and intersects various streets including Broadway, which was once SR 529 and US 99, Hoyt Avenue, which is the location of the Everett Public Library,[4] listed on the National Register of Historic Places,[5] and Marine View Drive, where the road turns north to parallel a BNSF Railway route and serve the Everett waterfront, which includes Naval Station Everett and Jetty Island, accessed via a ferry near 10th Street.[6][7][8]

Leaving the waterfront, SR 529 parallels the Snohomish River southeast to a partial cloverleaf interchange with Broadway, which was SR 529 before 1991 and US 99, and Marine View Drive,[9] which continues southeast to I-5 at exit 195.[10] The highway travels over the Snohomish River onto Smith Island, part of the Delta neighborhood of Everett that is named after the delta of the Snohomish River located to the southwest.[8][11] The Snohomish River crossing was the busiest segment of SR 529 in 2007, with an estimated daily average of 33,000 motorists.[12] Crossing the Steamboat Slough as a freeway, SR 529 interchanges with I-5 northbound as exit 198 and enters Marysville after crossing the Ebey Slough.[13] Now named State Avenue, the street passes through the waterfront area of Downtown Marysville and the Marysville Mall before ending at the intersection with Fourth Street,[14][15] signed as SR 528 while State Avenue continues north to Smokey Point.[16][17]

Former route (1971–1991)[edit]

The former southern terminus of SR 529 at the I-5 / Broadway / 41st Street interchange, pictured in April 2008.

Prior to 1991, SR 529 was 1.19 miles (1.92 km) shorter and extended from I-5 and 41st Street (exit 192) to Marysville via Broadway.[2] The former and current routes both used the same route from the Marine View Drive intersection to Marysville. The former southern terminus was a large interchange with I-5 and 41st Street, which was SR 526 until 1969,[18] that had an underpass under I-5 southbound for a northbound I-5 offramp to Broadway and connections to I-5 northbound were accessed via 41st Street prior to 2005.[19] Broadway continued north past the Everett Memorial Stadium, home of the Everett AquaSox,[20] Everett Avenue (current SR 529) and the Everett Community College to join current SR 529 at the Marine View Drive interchange.[9][21] Between 2005 and 2008, exit 192 on I-5 was reconstructed. A new flyover ramp from I-5 northbound to Broadway northbound was added and the 41st Street interchange was transformed into a single-point urban interchange.[22][23][24]

History[edit]

Segments of current and former SR 529 were signed as U.S. Route 99 (US 99) from 1926 until 1968.

SR 529 was established in 1971,[1] but the road's history predates that. Citizens of both Everett and Marysville proposed that a road between the two cities via the Snohomish River delta was needed, but the proposed roadway was rejected.[25] A subsequent map published in 1911 showed the Everett and Marysville segments complete, but the bridges over the Snohomish River delta were railroad bridges.[26] In 1913, the Pacific Highway was added to the state highway system and used Broadway (former SR 529) in Everett and State Avenue in Marysville to travel between Seattle and the Canadian border.[27] The Pacific Highway between Everett and Marysville, named the Vernon Road, was paved in 1916 and paid by a county road bond issue.[18] The highway was later signed as State Road 1 in 1923,[28] which became the Washington segment of U.S. Route 99 (US 99) during the creation of the United States Numbered Highways in 1926.[29] Since the bridges over the Snohomish River delta weren't complete at the time of planning, US 99 used present-day US 2, SR 204 and Sunnyside Boulevard to connect Everett and Marysville.[30] The bridges were completed in 1926 and opened on 23 August 1927,[31] after the creation of US 99.[18]

In 1991, SR 529 was realigned to serve Naval Station Everett

State Road 1 was replaced by Primary State Highway 1 (PSH 1) in the Primary state highways, which was created in 1937.[32][33][34] US 99 fully replaced PSH 1 during the 1964 highway renumbering.[35] Interstate 5 (I-5) later replaced US 99 between 1966 and 1970.[36][37] SR 529 was created in 1971 and ran from what was SR 526 until 1969,[18] now 41st Street, north on old US 99 (Broadway) to SR 528 in Marysville.[1] In May 1983, the location of a new home port for the United States Navy was narrowed down to Everett and Seattle, as proposed by Senator Henry M. Jackson (D), who died later that September. Everett was selected in April 1984 and the groundbreaking ceremony was held on 9 November 1987. On 5 September 1991, the new navy base was opened and SR 529 was shortened and rerouted to serve the new base, later named Naval Station Everett.[18][38] A new spur route to serve as a connector between SR 529 and I-5 northbound in 1991.[38] The highway was declared the Yellow Ribbon Highway in November 2009 by the Legislature after a successful campaign led by Everett resident Nathan Olson.[39] The sign unvieling ceremony was attended by WSDOT, elected officials, Naval Station Everett and community members on 5 November 2009.[40] The 4-lane fixed bridge over Ebey Slough that connects SR 529 from Everett to Marysville was fully completed in 2013, replacing a two-lane swing bridge that was 87 years old.[41]

Major intersections[edit]

The entire highway is in Snohomish County.

Location Mile[2] km Destinations Notes
Everett 0.00 0.00 I‑5 south – Seattle, Tacoma, Olympia Southern terminus; interchange
0.19 0.31 US 2 east (Hewitt Avenue) – Snohomish, Monroe, Wenatchee
0.29 0.47 US 2 west (California Street)
0.38 0.61
SR 529 Spur east (Everett Avenue) to I‑5 north – Marysville
0.87 1.40 Broadway Former SR 529; earlier US 99
4.82 7.76 Broadway Former SR 529; earlier US 99
4.82 7.76 To I‑5 south via Marine View Drive
South end of freeway
  7.29 11.73 I‑5 north – Arlington, Mount Vernon, Bellingham Interchange
  North end of freeway
Marysville 7.88 12.68 SR 528 (Fourth Street) to I‑5 – Tulalip Bay Northern terminus; continues north as State Avenue
1.000 mi = 1.609 km; 1.000 km = 0.621 mi

Spur route[edit]


State Route 529 Spur
Location: Everett, Washington
Existed: 1991–present

SR 529 also has a 0.20-mile (0.32 km) long spur route in Everett that extends from SR 529 to Interstate 5 (I-5) northbound, numbered exit 194.[2][3] Since exit 193, the southern terminus of SR 529, only serves I-5 southbound, the spur route was established in 1991 to complete the interchange.[3][38] Exit 194 also serves U.S. Route 2 (US 2), which terminates at SR 529.[3] In 2007, the highway had a daily average of 17,000 motorists.[12]

Major intersections

The entire highway is in Everett, Snohomish County.

Mile[2] km Destinations Notes
0.00 0.00 SR 529 (Maple Street) – Marysville Western terminus
0.20 0.32 I‑5 north – Marysville, Seattle, Mount Vernon Eastern terminus
1.000 mi = 1.609 km; 1.000 km = 0.621 mi

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c Washington State Legislature (1971; revised 1991). "RCW 47.17.752: State route No. 529". Retrieved 21 July 2009. 
  2. ^ a b c d e Washington State Department of Transportation (2008). "State Highway Log: Planning Report, SR 2 to SR 971". Retrieved 21 July 2009. 
  3. ^ a b c d e Washington State Department of Transportation (12 May 2009). "SR 5 – Exit 193 / 194; Junction Pacific Avenue / SR 2 / SR 529". Retrieved 22 July 2009. 
  4. ^ Everett Public Library. "Main Library – Downtown Everett". Retrieved 22 July 2009. 
  5. ^ HistoricEverett.org. "Historic Everett – National, State & Everett Historic Registers: National Register of Historic Places Properties in Everett, WA". Retrieved 22 July 2009. 
  6. ^ Washington State Department of Transportation (2008). Washington State Railroad System (Map). http://www.wsdot.wa.gov/NR/rdonlyres/8CFBC47D-3549-4CB9-9DE6-14CE9739671F/0/RailSystemMap_Sept2008_update.pdf. Retrieved 22 July 2009.
  7. ^ Port of Everett, Washington. "Port of Everett Properties: Jetty Island". Retrieved 22 July 2009. 
  8. ^ a b City of Everett, Washington. City of Everett Zoning Map (Map). 1 in. = 1600 ft.. http://www.everettwa.org/Get_PDF.aspx?pdfID=2242. Retrieved 22 July 2009.
  9. ^ a b Washington State Department of Transportation (3 October 2004). "SR 529; Junction Marine View Drive / Walnut Street". Retrieved 22 July 2009. 
  10. ^ Washington State Department of Transportation (11 May 2009). "SR 5 – Exit 195; Junction Marine View Drive". Retrieved 22 July 2009. 
  11. ^ City of Everett, Washington. "Delta in Everett". Retrieved 22 July 2009. 
  12. ^ a b Washington State Department of Transportation (2007). "2007 Annual Traffic Report". Retrieved 22 July 2009. 
  13. ^ Washington State Department of Transportation (15 September 2004). "SR 5 – Exit 198; Junction SR 529". Retrieved 22 July 2009. 
  14. ^ Google Inc. "State Route 529". Google Maps (Map). Cartography by Google, Inc. http://maps.google.com/maps?f=d&source=s_d&saddr=Pacific+Ave&daddr=Maple+St+to:Everett+Ave%2FWA-529+to:48.000461,-122.213802+to:State+Ave&hl=en&geocode=FRAR3AIdXYW3-A%3BFYQh3AIdeoO3-A%3BFdYl3AId0Ci3-A%3B%3BFZ423QIdNrq3-A&mra=dpe&mrcr=0&mrsp=3&sz=15&via=1,2,3&sll=47.991128,-122.209554&sspn=0.020851,0.038495&ie=UTF8&ll=48.013812,-122.190285&spn=0.166738,0.307961&z=12. Retrieved 22 July 2009.
  15. ^ Washington State Department of Transportation (2008). Washington State Highways, 2008–2009 (Map). 1:842,000. Cartography by United States Geological Survey (2008–09 edition ed.). Section D3. http://www.wsdot.wa.gov/NR/rdonlyres/87105CAD-83A9-49A7-80F3-5719637C1E2D/0/FrontMapBig.pdf. Retrieved 22 July 2009.
  16. ^ City of Marysville, Washington (2008). City of Marysville, December 2008 (Map). 1:40,000. http://www.marysvillewa.gov/gis/maps/Marysville_11x17.pdf. Retrieved 22 July 2009.
  17. ^ Thomas Bros., Rand McNally (2008). King, Pierce & Snohomish Counties Street Guide (Map). 1:24,000. The Thomas Guide series. Cartography by NAVTEQ. pp. F, 376, 396. ISBN 0-528-86671-0.
  18. ^ a b c d e Cameron, David A.; LeWarne, Charles P.; May, M. Allan; O'Donnell, Jack C.; O'Donnell, Lawrence E. (2005). Grimes, Lynne, ed. Snohomish County: An Illustrated History. Index, Washington: Kelcema Books LLC. pp. 170, 223, 254, 335, 351, 354–356. ISBN 0-9766700-0-3. 
  19. ^ Washington State Department of Transportation (15 September 2004). "SR 5 – Exit 192; Junction 41st Street / Old SR 529 / Broadway Avenue". Archived from the original on 8 October 2006. Retrieved 26 July 2009. 
  20. ^ Everett AquaSox (2009). "Everett AquaSox: Ballpark". Retrieved 26 July 2009. 
  21. ^ Google Inc. "Former Route of State Route 529". Google Maps (Map). Cartography by Google, Inc. http://maps.google.com/maps?f=d&source=s_d&saddr=Broadway&daddr=E+Marine+View+Dr%2FWA-529&hl=en&geocode=Fbni2wIdzVy3-A%3BFSCY3AIdVYa3-A&mra=ls&sll=47.987625,-122.19591&sspn=0.083411,0.15398&ie=UTF8&ll=47.988083,-122.19595&spn=0.08341,0.15398&z=13. Retrieved 26 July 2009.
  22. ^ Washington State Department of Transportation (2008). "I-5 – Everett SR 526 to US 2 HOV Lanes – Complete June 2008". Retrieved 26 July 2009. 
  23. ^ Washington State Department of Transportation (2005). Expanding I-5 Through Everett (Map). http://www.wsdot.wa.gov/Projects/I5/HOVSR526toUS2/map.htm. Retrieved 26 July 2009.
  24. ^ Washington State Department of Transportation (13 May 2009). "SR 5 – Exit 192; Junction 41st Street / Old SR 529 / Broadway Avenue". Retrieved 26 July 2009. 
  25. ^ Whitfield, William M. (1979) [Originally published in 1926]. History of Snohomish County, Washington. Volume 1 (Limited ed.). Chicago; Seattle: Pioneer Historical Publishing Company. p. 201. "Marysville Cut-off Proposed: During the year 1898, Everett people became greatly interested in a cut-off road from Everett to Marysville across the flats at the mouth of the Snohomish River. There was much agitation, but commissioners held that the cost was prohibitive, and ut was bit ybtuk[clarification needed] 1925 under the direction of the State Highway Commission that this work was undertaken, it being now under construction at a cost of more than $1,000,000." 
  26. ^ Washington State University (1911). Mount Vernon, 1911 (Map). 1:125,000. Washington 1:125,000 topographic quadrangles. Cartography by United States Geological Survey. http://content.wsulibs.wsu.edu/cgi-bin/pview.exe?CISOROOT=/maps&CISOPTR=447&CISORESTMP=/qbuild/buildplate11.html&CISOVIEWTMP=/qbuild/buildplate12.html&CISOROWS=2&CISOCOLS=5&CISOCLICK=title:subjec:creato:date:type. Retrieved 26 July 2009.
  27. ^ Washington State Legislature (12 March 1913). "Chapter 65: Classifying Public Highways". Session Laws of the State of Washington. Session Laws of the State of Washington (1913 ed.). Olympia, Washington: Washington State Legislature. p. 221. Retrieved 26 July 2009. "a. A highway starting at the international boundary line at Blaine, Washington; thence southerly by the most feasible route through the cities of Bellingham, Mount Vernon, Everett, Seattle, Renton, along the easterly side of the White River Valley through Kent, Auburn, Tacoma, Olympia, Tenino, Centralia, Chehalis, to the southern boundary line at the city of Vancouver, Washington, to be known as The Pacific Highway." 
  28. ^ Washington State Legislature (19 March 1909). "Chapter 185: Primary and Secondary State Highways". Session Laws of the State of Washington. Session Laws of the State of Washington (1923 ed.). Olympia, Washington: Washington State Legislature. pp. 627–628. "SECTION 1. A primary state highway, to be known as State Road No. 1 or the Pacific Highway, is established as follows: Beginning at the international boundary line at Blaine in the County of Whatcom; thence by the most feasible route in a southerly direction through the cities of Bellingham, Mt. Vernon, Everett, Seattle, Tacoma, Olympia, Chehalis, Kelso and Vancouver to the interstate bridge over the Columbia River between Vancouver and Portland." 
  29. ^ Oklahoma Department of Transportation (11 November 1926). United States System of Highways (Map). Cartography by United States Department of Agriculture. http://www.okladot.state.ok.us/hqdiv/p-r-div/maps/misc-maps/1926us.pdf. Retrieved 26 July 2009.
  30. ^ Rand McNally (1926). Rand McNally Junior Road Map, Washington (Map). http://www.broermapsonline.org/members/NorthAmerica/UnitedStates/Northwest/Washington/unitedstates1926ra_076.html. Retrieved 26 July 2009.
  31. ^ Dougherty, Phil (10 May 2007). "Roadway known as the Marysville-Everett cutoff opens on August 23, 1927.". HistoryLink. Retrieved 18 September 2009. 
  32. ^ Washington State Legislature (17 March 1937). "Chapter 190: Establishment of Primary State Highways". Session Laws of the State of Washington. Session Laws of the State of Washington (1937 ed.). Olympia, Washington: Washington State Legislature. p. 933. Retrieved 26 July 2009. "SECTION 1. A primary state highway to be known as Primary State Highway No. 1, or the Pacific Highway, is hereby established according to description as follows: Beginning at the international boundary line in the vicinity of Blaine in Whatcom county, thence in a southerly direction by the most feasible route by way of Bellingham, thence to the east of Lake Samish, thence in a southerly direction by the most feasible route by way of Mt. Vernon, Everett, Seattle, Tacoma, Olympia, Centralia, Chehalis, Kelso and Vancouver to the Washington-Oregon boundary line on the interstate bridge over the Columbia river; also beginning at Bellingham on Primary State Highway No. 1, as herein described, thence in an easterly direction by the most feasible route to a point in the vicinity of Austin Pass in Whatcom county; also beginning at Bellingham on Primary State Highway No. 1, as herein described, thence in a southerly direction by the most feasible route by way of Blanchard to a junction with Primary State Highway No. 1, as herein described, in the vicinity of Mt. Vernon; also beginning at Mt. Vernon on Primary State Highway No. 1, as herein described, thence in a westerly direction by the most feasible route to Anacortes; also beginning at Everett in the vicinity of Broadway Avenue, thence in a southwesterly direction by the most feasible route to a junction with Primary State Highway No. 1, as herein described, in the vicinity south of Everett." 
  33. ^ Rand McNally (1946). Northwest, 1946 (Map). p. 16. http://www.broermapsonline.org/members/NorthAmerica/UnitedStates/Northwest/randmcnally_ra_1946_016.html. Retrieved 26 July 2009.
  34. ^ University of Texas at Austin (1958). Seattle, 1958 (Map). 1:250,000. Cartography by United States Geological Survey. http://www.lib.utexas.edu/maps/topo/250k/txu-pclmaps-topo-us-seattle-1958.jpg. Retrieved 26 July 2009.
  35. ^ C. G. Prahl (1 December 1965). "Identification of State Highways". Washington State Highway Commission, Department of Highways. Retrieved 26 July 2009. 
  36. ^ University of Texas at Austin (1965). Seattle, 1965 (Map). 1:250,000. Cartography by United States Geological Survey. http://www.lib.utexas.edu/maps/topo/250k/txu-pclmaps-topo-us-seattle-1965.jpg. Retrieved 26 July 2009.
  37. ^ University of Texas at Austin (1966). Victoria, 1966 (Map). 1:250,000. Cartography by United States Geological Survey. http://www.lib.utexas.edu/maps/topo/250k/txu-pclmaps-topo-us-victoria-1966.jpg. Retrieved 26 July 2009.
  38. ^ a b c Washington House of Representatives (1991). "Chapter 342, Laws of 1991: State Highway Routes – Revisons To (House Bill 5801)". Washington State Legislature. Retrieved 26 July 2009. "Sec. 42. RCW 47.17.752 and 1971 ex.s. c 73 s 19 are each amended to read as follows: A state highway to be known as state route number 529 is established as follows: Beginning at a junction with state route number 5 in Everett, thence westerly and northerly through Everett to a junction with state route number 528 in Marysville." 
  39. ^ Seattle Times staff (4 November 2009). "State renames Everett-Marysville road to honor military". The Seattle Times (Seattle). Retrieved 4 November 2009. 
  40. ^ "Local officials and the community help dedicate the SR 529 Yellow Ribbon Highway in Everett" (Press release). Washington State Department of Transportation. 5 November 2009. Retrieved 6 November 2009. 
  41. ^ Washington State Department of Transportation. "SR 529 - Ebey Slough Bridge Replacement - Completed July 2013". Washington State Department of Transportation. Retrieved 18 December 2013. 

External links[edit]

Route map: Google / Bing