State and National Law School

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State and National Law School
Active 1849–1860's
Type public
President John W. Fowler
Location Ballston Spa, New York, USA

State and National Law School was an early practical training law school founded in 1849 by John W. Fowler in Ballston Spa, New York located in Saratoga County. It was also known as New York State and National Law School, Ballston Law School, and Fowler's State and National Law School. In 1853 the school relocated to Poughkeepsie in Dutchess County, New York. The school closed its doors sometime in the 1860s.

History[edit]

Founded in 1849, by John W. Fowler, the school was one of the first in the country to provide practical training for law students.[1] The school was established in the old Sans Souci hotel in Ballston Spa and only stayed in the facility for three years.[2]

The school was under supervision of a Board of Trustees appointed by the legislature of the State of New York.[1]

"The National Law School used very advanced teaching methods for its time. "There, students were assembled into mock courtroom scenarios, playing all of the roles witnesses, bailiffs, jurors, and attorneys. The professors were the judges, and the teams of attorneys were given a set of facts to work with to build their case." [3]

In 1849 the law school briefly hosted the Beta Proteron Charge of Theta Delta Chi Fraternity.[4]

The institution struggled financially and also encountered problems with its facilities in Ballston Spa. President Fowler made the decision to relocate the law school to Poughkeepsie in late 1852.[5]

In January 1853 the school opened for its first term in Poughkeepsie.[5] The reasons given for the move as stated by the trustees; the building in Ballston is old and the rooms are cold, while in Poughkeepsie our accommodations are comfortable and pleasant. The village to which we have removed is much larger and more pleasant than Ballston, containing six or eight flourishing Literary Institutions, of which four are Female Seminaries. The people of Poughkeepsie furnish, besides these Libraries, adequate funds to place the institution on a high and permanent basis." [5]

Degrees granted[edit]

The board was authorized to confer upon each graduate the degree of LL.B. (Bachelor of Laws).[1]

Closure[edit]

The law school closed its doors during the 1860s.

Notable alumni[edit]

For its short tenure, the law school produced many prominent alumni:

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c The University Quarterly. Tuttle, Morehouse & Taylor, Printers, January and April, 1860. Retrieved June 7, 2010. 
  2. ^ "History of Milton, N.Y.". The Saratogian - The Boston History Company, Publishers. 1899. Retrieved 2010-06-07. 
  3. ^ Young, Robin (2006). For love & liberty: the untold Civil War story of Major Sullivan Ballou.. New York, N.Y.: Publishers Group West. Retrieved June 7, 2010. 
  4. ^ Theta Delta Chi International Fraternity, "Theta Delta Chi's history of growth."
  5. ^ a b c "Circular Letter.". The New York Times. December 20, 1872. Retrieved June 7, 2010. 
  6. ^ "Chester Arthur". Biographical Directory of the United States Congress. Retrieved 13 December 2012. 
  7. ^ The Saratogian, History Lesson: Ballston Spa's law school attracted luminaries, May 22, 2011
  8. ^ "Angus Cameron". Biographical Directory of the United States Congress. Retrieved 13 December 2012. 
  9. ^ George E. Matthews, & Co., The Men of New York, 1898, page 95
  10. ^ "Ralph Hill". Biographical Directory of the United States Congress. Retrieved 13 December 2012. 
  11. ^ The Vermonter magazine, Choice for a United States Senatorship, January, 1900, page 106
  12. ^ Oscar Tully Shuck, Bench and Bar in California, 1889, page 95
  13. ^ "Samuel D. McEnery". Biographical Directory of the United States Congress. Retrieved 13 December 2012. 
  14. ^ A. L. Bancroft and Company, Contemporary Biography of California's Representative Men, 1881, page 134
  15. ^ "Henry Wilbur Palmer". Biographical Directory of the United States Congress. Retrieved 13 December 2012. 
  16. ^ Oscar Tully Shuck, History of the Bench and Bar of California, 1901, page 494
  17. ^ "Lionel Allen Sheldon". Biographical Directory of the United States Congress. Retrieved 13 December 2012. 
  18. ^ "Julius L. Strong". Biographical Directory of the United States Congress. Retrieved 13 December 2012. 
  19. ^ "Ormsby B. Thomas". Biographical Directory of the United States Congress. Retrieved 13 December 2012. 
  20. ^ "Henry D. Washburn". Biographical Directory of the United States Congress. Retrieved 13 December 2012. 
  21. ^ "William Brewster Williams". Biographical Directory of the United States Congress. Retrieved 13 December 2012.