Stateside (film)

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Stateside
Stateside Poster.jpeg
Theatrical Poster
Directed by Reverge Anselmo
Produced by Robert Greenhut
Written by Reverge Anselmo
Starring Rachael Leigh Cook
Jonathan Tucker
Agnes Bruckner
Val Kilmer
Joe Mantegna
Carrie Fisher
Diane Venora
Ed Begley, Jr.
Daniel Franzese
Paul Le Mat
Penny Marshall
Narrated by Jonathan Tucker (In Some Parts Of The Film)
Music by Joel McNeely
Edited by Suzy Elmiger
Distributed by Samuel Goldwyn Films
Release date(s) May 21, 2004
Running time 96 Mins.
Country United States
Language English

Stateside (released as Sinners in Germany) is a 2004 romantic drama film film based on a true story. It is an adventurous love story about a high school rich kid serving in the Marine Corps to avoid jail, who eventually falls in love with a schizophrenic actress. Those around them ask them to keep their distance from each other, but both refuse. The film is based on a true story, supposedly about actress Sarah Holcomb.[1]

The film is rated R for language, some sexuality/nudity, and underage drinking. It was released to theaters on May 21, 2004, and released on video/DVD on October 12, 2004.

Plot[edit]

Dorri Lawrence (Cook) is an actress and singer who resides in Hollywood, California. She is an undiagnosed schizophrenic, which causes problems in her career. After another concert goes wrong due to her untreated disease, she is finally sent to get help for her schizophrenia.

Meanwhile, Mark Deloach (Tucker) is a rich high school kid miles away, attending a Catholic school. Though generally shy around girls and a good kid, he takes part in underage drinking. His brother, Gregory, who has secret sexual rendezvous with the prestigious Sue Dubois (Bruckner), has one of their dirty notes blamed on him. He and a buddy of his decide to pay him back by taking Sue back to her mother and reveal what's been going on with her and Gregory which they knew she will not approve of. In the process a DWI car crash occurs, resulting in the injury of both Sue and Father Concoff (Begley), the principal of their high school.

Sue's mother, Mrs. Dubois (Fisher), decides to press charges against Mark. However, a deal is made to have Mark serve in the Marine Corps instead of jail time.

Mark departs to his training and finds that the Senior Drill Instructor, Staff Sergeant Skeer (Kilmer), has taken an interest in him as his pet project due to Mark using the Corps to escape jail time. Eventually, Mark satisfies the tough platoon leader and Mark officially becomes a Marine.

Once back home he finds himself cutting ties with his friends and ends up befriending Sue, who is now in a half way house, and Dorri, who is her roommate. He also apologizes to Father Concoff, who accepts his apology though still angry with what occurred. Mark and Dorri set up a date with each other to go to a dance, but she doesn't get to go. Mark leaves her gift. Later, he and Dorri go out on a date and Mark losing his virginity with her.

Dorri and Mark keep in contact through letters and phone calls, but eventually Dorri's illness worsens and she loses touch with reality. Friends and family beg Mark to help Dorri get treatment, but he opposes any suggestion that might separate them. Eventually, an intervention support group keeps the two away.

Mark is deployed to overseas action and is injured in the bombing of the Marine Barracks in Beirut in 1983. He returns home with an honorable discharge. Apart for two years, Dorri contacts Mark in a hospital where he has been healing from his wounds. They plan to marry and start a new life together.

Production[edit]

Co-Producer Bonnie Hlinomaz claims that after just reading the first page of the script, she instantly wanted to be part of the film. The film took eight weeks to shoot. To prepare for the role, Cook actually spent time with patients suffering from schizophrenia, and read medical books from her father on this subject.

Anselmo, the writer/director, was a Marine, and the men who played Marines, actually went through Marine boot camp to prepare for their roles.

Reception[edit]

Released on May 21, 2004, the film was a box office failure, and experienced a very brief run in theaters, making just $113,620. Critical response was largely negative, and it currently holds a 24% positive rating at Rotten Tomatoes.

References[edit]

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