Steel roller coaster

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A steel roller coaster is a roller coaster that is defined by having a track made of steel. Steel coasters have earned immense popularity in the past 50 years throughout the world. Incorporating tubular steel track and polyurethane-coated wheels, the steel roller coasters can provide a taller, smoother, and faster ride with more inversions than a traditional wooden roller coaster.

Arrow Dynamics first introduced the steel roller coaster to feature tubular track to the thrill industry with their creations of the Matterhorn Bobsleds (Disneyland) in 1959 and the Runaway Mine Train (Six Flags Over Texas) in 1966.

As of 2006, the oldest operating steel roller coaster in North America is Little Dipper at Memphis Kiddie Park in Brooklyn, Ohio and has been operating since April 1952. The oldest operating steel rollercoaster in the world is rodelbaan at de Waarbeek (Netherlands). It has been operating since 1930.

Characteristics[edit]

  • Steel coasters have a generally smoother ride than their wooden counterparts and due to their strength rides can have more complex and faster turns and twists without injuring riders. Although some coaster enthusiasts prefer wooden coasters because the ride tosses you around more making the ride feel more dangerous and giving a larger adrenaline rush.
  • Almost all world records for tallest, fastest, and longest coasters are currently held by steel roller coasters.[citation needed]
  • The fact that fewer supports are needed means steel roller coasters have made a large variety of features possible, such as loops, barrel rolls, corkscrews, zero-G rolls and beyond 90° drops.

There are different types of steel coasters, such as flying, inverted, floorless, and suspended.

Notable steel roller coasters[edit]

Dorney Park and Wildwater Kingdom's Steel Force and Thunderhawk roller coasters, just outside Allentown. Steel Force opened in 1997 as the tallest and fastest roller coaster on the East Coast of the United States, with a first drop of 205 feet (62 m) and a top speed of 75 miles per hour (121 km/h).[1]

(NOTE: Diving and Vertical Dropping coasters are the same)

References[edit]

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  22. ^ Tweedy, Joanna (17 June 2011). "Don't look down! Japanese theme park set to take the title of 'world's steepest rollercoaster' from UK's Flamingoland". Daily Mail. Retrieved 13 July 2011. 
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  24. ^ "Takabisha, World's Steepest Rollercoaster, To Open In Japan (VIDEO)". Huffington Post. 17 June 2011. Retrieved 13 July 2011. 
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