Stefan Lindemann

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Stefan Lindemann
Stefan Lindemann GER EC2010 FP.jpg
Stefan Lindemann at the 2010 European Championships.
Personal information
Full name Stefan Lindemann
Country represented Germany
Born (1980-09-30) 30 September 1980 (age 33)
Erfurt, Thuringia
Residence Berlin
Height 1.63 m (5 ft 4 in)
Coach Viola Striegler
Former coach Ilona Schindler
Sonja Morgenstern
Choreographer Iwo Svec
Skating club Eissportclub Erfurt
Retired 2010
ISU personal best scores
Combined total 203.95
2010 Europeans
Short program 70.19
2010 Europeans
Free skate 133.76
2010 Europeans

Stefan Lindemann (born 30 September 1980 in Erfurt) is a German figure skater. He is the 2004 World bronze medalist, 2005 European bronze medalist, 2000 World Junior champion, and a seven-time (2000, 2002, 2004–2007, 2010) German national champion.

Career[edit]

Stefan Lindeman started skating at age 4[1] in Erfurt at the local skating club. At age 12 he wanted to play ice hockey, but his mother kept him in figure skating.[2] His coach was Ilona Schindler. After finishing his school be became sponsored by the Bundeswehr (German Army).

In 1995, at age 14, Lindemann made his first successful appearance in the international figure skating scene by placing fourth at the junior world championships. In 1996 he placed 12th at the German nationals. He placed fourth in the same event in 1997, second in 1999, and first in 2000, becoming the German champion. In 2000, he won the World Junior Championships. This was the first such title for the German Figure Skating Organisation, Deutsche Eislauf-Union.[2]

At the 2000 Sparkassen Cup, Lindemann injured his knee when he fell on a triple Axel in the short program.[2] He tore a ligament in his right knee and pulled a muscle in his talocalcanean joint.[citation needed]

In 2004, Lindemann became German champion and won the bronze medal at the World Championships in Dortmund. In 2005, he won the bronze medal at the European Championships. At Worlds, he missed all his jumps in the short program but pulled up to 12th after a strong performance in the free program.

He is the most successful German figure skater in the men's single event since Norbert Schramm, who won silver in both 1982 and 1983 at the World championships.

Lindemann withdrew from the 2006-2007 Grand Prix series due to injury.

He returned to skating in 2009 and won the German title. He then placed 9th at the 2010 European Championship and represented Germany at the Vancouver 2010 Olympics. In the Olympics he scored 68.50 in the short program, placing 17th. In the long program he received a score of 103.48, placing 23rd in the long program.Over all he received 171.98. Overall results he placed 22nd at the Vancouver 2010 Olympics.[3]

Lindemann retired from competitive skating right after the Olympics in 2010. He has become a coach, working in Berlin, and remains in the German army.[4]

Programs[edit]

Season Short program Free skating Exhibition
2009–2010
[5]
2006–2007
[6]
2005–2006
[7]
  • Robot City
    by John Powell, Blue Man Group
2004–2005
[8]
  • The Big Bounce
    by George S. Clinton
2003–2004
[9][1]
  • The Importance of Being Earnest
    by Charlie Mole
  • Le Petit Poucet
    by Joe Hisaihi
    performed by the Paris Philharmonic Orchestra
2002–2003
[10]
  • Le Petit Poucet
    by Joe Hisaihi
    performed by the Paris Philharmonic Orchestra
2001–2002
[11]
  • The Princess and the Warrior
    by Pale 3
2000–2001
[2]
  • Rudy
    by Jerry Goldsmith

Competitive highlights[edit]

1997–2010[edit]

Results[12]
International
Event 1997–98 1998–99 1999–00 2000–01 2001–02 2002–03 2003–04 2004–05 2005–06 2006–07 2008–09 2009–10
Olympics 21st 22nd
Worlds 13th 14th 18th 3rd 12th 12th
Europeans 17th 8th 12th 12th 5th 3rd 12th 11th 9th
GP Cup of China 3rd
GP Cup of Russia 4th
GP Lalique 11th
GP NHK Trophy 11th
GP Skate America 9th 9th
GP Skate Canada 6th
GP Sparkassen WD 7th
Bofrost Cup 1st 1st
Finlandia 8th
Golden Spin 3rd
Ice Challenge 5th
Karl Schäfer 5th
Merano Cup 8th
Nebelhorn 8th 1st 8th
NRW Trophy 16th
Ondrej Nepela 2nd 2nd 1st
International: Junior
Junior Worlds 14th 1st
JGP Final 4th 2nd
JGP Bulgaria 2nd
JGP Canada 5th
JGP Germany 12th 2nd
JGP Slovenia 1st
JGP Ukraine 4th
National
German Champ. 2nd 1st 1st 2nd 1st 1st 1st 1st 1st
GP = Grand Prix; JGP = Junior Grand Prix; WD = Withdrew
Lindemann did not compete in the 2007–2008 season.

1993–1997[edit]

Results[12]
International: Junior
Event 1993–94 1994–95 1995–96 1996–97
Gardena Spring Trophy 2nd J.
Blue Swords 15th J.
Grand Prize SNP 6th J.
National
German Championships 11th J. 4th J. 12th 5th
J. = Junior level

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Mittan, Barry (4 January 2004). "Germany’s Lindemann Battles for Spot in Dortmund". Golden Skate. 
  2. ^ a b c d "Stefan LINDEMANN: 2000/2001". International Skating Union. Archived from the original on 17 April 2001. 
  3. ^ Olympic profile
  4. ^ Kany, Klaus-Reinhold (13 July 2011). "European News: Aliona Savchenko and Robin Szolkowy and More: Summer Updates". IFS Magazine. Retrieved 29 July 2011. 
  5. ^ "Stefan LINDEMANN: 2009/2010". International Skating Union. Archived from the original on 13 November 2011. 
  6. ^ "Stefan LINDEMANN: 2006/2007". International Skating Union. Archived from the original on 4 July 2007. 
  7. ^ "Stefan LINDEMANN: 2005/2006". International Skating Union. Archived from the original on 15 June 2006. 
  8. ^ "Stefan LINDEMANN: 2004/2005". International Skating Union. Archived from the original on 5 April 2005. 
  9. ^ "Stefan LINDEMANN: 2003/2004". International Skating Union. Archived from the original on 4 June 2004. 
  10. ^ "Stefan LINDEMANN: 2002/2003". International Skating Union. Archived from the original on 8 June 2003. 
  11. ^ "Stefan LINDEMANN: 2001/2002". International Skating Union. Archived from the original on 11 June 2002. 
  12. ^ a b "Competition Results: Stefan LINDEMANN". International Skating Union. Archived from the original on 22 December 2012. 

External links[edit]