Stefan Olszowski

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Stefan Olszowski
Minister of Foreign Affairs
In office
July 1982 – 12 November 1985
Prime Minister Mieczyslaw Rakowski
Preceded by Józef Czyrek
Succeeded by Marian Orzechowski
Minister of Foreign Affairs
In office
22 December 1971 – 2 December 1976
Preceded by Stefan Jędrychowski
Succeeded by Emil Wojtaszek
Personal details
Born (1931-08-28) 28 August 1931 (age 83)
Torun, Poland
Nationality Polish
Political party Polish United Workers' Party

Stefan Olszowski (born 28 August 1931) is a Polish politician, who was a member of the Polish United Workers' Party. He served as the foreign minister of the People's Republic of Poland for two terms.

Biography[edit]

Olszowski was born in Torun on 28 August 1931.[1] He was a member of the Politburo of the Polish United Workers' party from December 1970 to his resignation on 12 November 1985.[2][3] He served as the propaganda chief of the party in the late 1960s and at the beginning of the 1970s.[4][5]

He was appointed foreign minister on 22 December 1971, succeeding Stefan Jędrychowski.[6] He was in office until 2 December 1976 when Emil Wojtaszek replaced him in the post.[6] In 1980, he was appointed ambassador to East Germany and left the politburo for this post that he held just six months.[3] Then he continued to serve at the politburo.[3] He acted as the party's central committee secretary for ideology and media from August 1980 to July 1982.[7][8] Then he was secondly appointed foreign minister in July 1982, replacing Józef Czyrek in the post.[8] Before his appointment as foreign minister he run for the presidency of the party, but he was not elected.[9] His term as foreign minister ended on 12 November 1985.[10] He was also dismissed from the party leadership in 1985, partly due to his relationship with a Polish journalist whom he married after divorcing his first spouse.[11] Then he settled in New York in 1986.[12]

Views and activities[edit]

Under the Edward Gierek's rule in the party, Olszowski was a reformist.[13] However, later he became a hard-liner politician and a supporter of the Soviet Union while he was in office.[12] In March 1968, he was the leading orchestrator of the anti-Semitic campaign began in Poland.[4] In November 1973, he paid an official visit to Rome that was the first official visit to the Vatican by a Polish government minister since World War II.[14][15] However, during the visit of Pope to Poland from 16 to 23 June 1983 he and Prime Minister Mieczyslaw Rakowski directly attacked on some of the Pope's pronouncements.[16]

Olszowski together with other hard-liners strived for an armed confrontation with the Solidarity movement.[17] He was instrumential in cracking down the movement at its initial phase.[12]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Current world leaders: Almanac. 1972. p. 20. 
  2. ^ "Poland's Foreign Minister Loses Power Struggle, Quits Politburo". Orlando Sentinel. 12 November 1985. Retrieved 13 June 2013. 
  3. ^ a b c "Poland's foreign minister off politburo". Toledo Blade (Warsaw). AP. 12 November 1985. Retrieved 13 June 2013. 
  4. ^ a b Tych, Feliks (2011). "A Historical Miracle: Jewish Life in Poland afterCommunism". Deep Roots, New Branches: 31. Retrieved 13 June 2013. 
  5. ^ "Red Poles put blame for economic failue". Star News (Warsaw). UPI. 7 February 1971. Retrieved 16 June 2013. 
  6. ^ a b "Polish Ministries". Rulers. Retrieved 14 July 2013. 
  7. ^ Molin, Karl (30 June 2011). "The CPSU Politburo and the Polish crisis 1980—1981". Baltic Worlds. Retrieved 13 June 2013. 
  8. ^ a b Snutt, Anna (22 July 1982). "Veteran Polish politician is named foreign minister". The CS Monitor (Warsaw). Retrieved 14 July 2013. 
  9. ^ "New leadership team shifts focus to economy". CIA. 10 December 1985. Retrieved 13 June 2013. 
  10. ^ Gillette, Robert (13 November 1985). "Poland Completes Leadership Reshuffle". Los Angeles Times (Warsaw). Retrieved 13 June 2013. 
  11. ^ "Don’t Mess with Cupid: A Remembrance". Hoover Archivists' Musings. Blog of the Hoover Institution Library and Archives. 7 September 2010. Retrieved 14 July 2013. 
  12. ^ a b c Martin, Douglas (20 May 1988). "Love Moves Ex-Polish Leader From Warsaw to Rego Park". New York Times. Retrieved 13 June 2013. 
  13. ^ Werner G. Hahn (1987). Democracy in a Communist Party: Poland's Experience since 1980. New York: Columbia University Press.  – via Questia (subscription required)
  14. ^ Schopflin, George. "Poland: Troubled Relations Between Church and State". Biblical Studies. Retrieved 13 June 2013. 
  15. ^ "Warsaw minister calls on the Pope". The Calgary Herald (Rome). 13 November 1973. Retrieved 16 June 2013. 
  16. ^ de Weydenthal, J. B. (1984). "The Pope's Pilgrimage to Poland". Religion in Communist Lands 12 (1). Retrieved 24 August 2013. 
  17. ^ Gasztold-Seń, Przemysław (4 October 2011). "The Road to Martial Law: Polish Communist Authorities vs. Solidarity". Polish Institute of National Remembrance. Retrieved 13 June 2013.