Stendhal syndrome

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For the film, see The Stendhal Syndrome.

Stendhal syndrome, Stendhal's syndrome, hyperkulturemia, or Florence syndrome is a psychosomatic disorder that causes rapid heartbeat, dizziness, fainting, confusion and even hallucinations when an individual is exposed to an experience of great personal significance, particularly viewing art.[1] The term can also be used to describe a similar reaction when confronted with immense beauty in the natural world.[citation needed]

History[edit]

Stendhal syndrome was named after Henri-Marie Beyle (1783–1842), better known by his penname Stendhal.

The illness is named after the famous 19th-century French author Stendhal (pseudonym of Henri-Marie Beyle), who described his experience with the phenomenon during his 1817 visit to Florence in his book Naples and Florence: A Journey from Milan to Reggio.

When he visited the Basilica of Santa Croce, where Niccolò Machiavelli, Michelangelo and Galileo Galilei are buried, he saw Giotto's frescoes for the first time and was overcome with emotion. He wrote "I was in a sort of ecstasy, from the idea of being in Florence, close to the great men whose tombs I had seen. Absorbed in the contemplation of sublime beauty... I reached the point where one encounters celestial sensations... Everything spoke so vividly to my soul. Ah, if I could only forget. I had palpitations of the heart, what in Berlin they call 'nerves.' Life was drained from me. I walked with the fear of falling."[2]

Although there are many descriptions of people becoming dizzy and fainting while taking in Florentine art, especially at the Uffizi, dating from the early 19th century on, the syndrome was only named in 1979, when it was described by Italian psychiatrist Graziella Magherini, who observed and described more than 100 similar cases among tourists and visitors in Florence. There is no scientific evidence to define the Stendhal Syndrome as a specific psychiatric disorder; on the other hand there is evidence that the same cerebral areas involved in emotional reactions are activated during the exposure to artworks. [3]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Nicholson, T. R. J.; Pariante, C.; McLoughlin, D. (2009). "Stendhal syndrome: A case of cultural overload". Case Reports 2009: bcr0620080317. doi:10.1136/bcr.06.2008.0317.  edit
  2. ^ Interfaces of Performance, Maria Chatzichristodoulou, Janis Jefferies, Rachel Zerihan, Ashgate Publishing, Ltd., 2009 p196 ISBN 9781409486145
  3. ^ Innocenti Claudia, Fioravanti Giulia, Spiti Raffaello, Faravelli Carlo: The Stendhal Syndrome between Psychoanalysis and Neuroscience. Rivista di Psichiatria. 2014 Mar-Apr;49(2):61-6

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