Stephen King works related to The Dark Tower series

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Apart from the eight books in Stephen King's The Dark Tower series, many of his other works are connected to this series to varying degrees.[1]

Major connections[edit]

'Salem's Lot[edit]

Father Callahan, a major character in the latter part of the series, first appears in 'Salem's Lot, originally published in 1975, seven years before the first book in the series, and twenty-eight years before his reappearance in the fifth. Callahan and some other of the characters discover a copy of 'Salem's Lot, along with other King novels, in The Manhattan Restaurant of the Mind bookstore.

The Stand[edit]

The world of The Stand, first published in 1978, is visited in the fourth book of the series. Also, Randall Flagg is one of the main characters.

The Talisman[edit]

Twinners are present in The Talisman. The Talisman has a purpose similar to The Dark Tower, as it is a center of many different worlds and universes.

Also, in The Wastelands, Calvin Tower awards Jake Chambers the child's book of riddles for free for being smart enough, on such a beautiful spring day, to "light out for the Territories."

"The Mist"[edit]

In the novella "The Mist" (included in the collection Skeleton Crew), the cause of the Mist is alluded to be a tear between universes, similar to the Todash Darkness, a concept explored in the series, both of which supposedly renders its inhabitants "blind" and contains horrible creatures which prey on them. Additionally, several creatures described are physically similar to some of those shown in the series.

In the film adaption of "The Mist", David Drayton can be seen painting a portrait of Roland in the opening scene.

It[edit]

In It, it is stated that the enemy of It is a turtle. The Turtle is the guardian of the portal opposite the Bear (Shardik) in the third book of the series. Also mentioned is the phrase, "In this universe there might grow roses which sing." There is also a robot in the last book named Stuttering Bill, a nickname shared by Bill Denbrough. Pennywise the clown is the same kind of creature (psychic vampire that feeds on emotions) as Dandelo, who Roland, Susannah and Oy meet near the end of their quest to the Dark Tower. The store where Bill finds his old bike Silver is called 'Secondhand Rose, Secondhand Clothes', a reference to the many roses (which are always forces of good) in the Dark Tower series. There is also a reference in book 7, when the turtle passes out of existence; King writes "and the Turtle passed out this story (just as a paper boat you may remember)".

The Eyes of the Dragon[edit]

Flagg is a villain in The Eyes of the Dragon, and in the second book of the series, Roland alludes to a time when he encountered Thomas and Dennis chasing after Flagg. It is also mentioned briefly that one of Roland's ancestors tried to slay a dragon, but the dragon was already slain by another king, who was later murdered.

Insomnia[edit]

Insomnia's main character, Ralph Roberts, is made to save the life of the child Patrick Danville, a major character in the last book of the series. The "doctors" Clotho and Lachesis speak of ka, ka-tet, The Dark Tower, and singing roses at various points during the story. Additionally, various allusions are made to the Dark Tower, including Roberts meeting the Crimson King in person and Patrick Danville mentioning Roland by name in a drawing. In the Dark Tower VII, Roland is given a copy of Insomnia by Nancy Deepneau during his meeting with the Tet Corporation in New York. Also, deathbags and blue auras are present in the Dark Tower series.

Rose Madder[edit]

In Rose Madder, Rose travels to a different world, where she meets a woman who mentions the town of Lud. Ka is also mentioned a few times throughout the story.

Desperation[edit]

In Desperation, the villain Tak says many words that are very similar to the "speech of the dead", which is seen in The Dark Tower, especially The Little Sisters of Eluria and Black House. There are hints of "the deadlights", which indicate Tak may be a relative of the creature It/Pennywise.

When a character dies at the end of the book, death is described as "like swooning into a rose," a reference to the roses that surround the Dark Tower and the rose in the parking lot that serves at the Tower in one reality.

David Carver uses the word "God Bomb" when talking about messages from God. This is the same terminology used by the preacher outside of the Dark Tower in New York.

The Regulators[edit]

According to the flap for The Regulators, Richard Bachman's wife is called Claudia Inez Bachman. In Wolves Of The Calla, when Eddie and Jake go todash to New York, they see this New York's version of Charlie the Choo Choo is written by one Claudia y Inez Bachman.

Also, in Wolves Of The Calla, Father Callahan calls the Low Men "Regulators." Tak, the villain from Desperation, is also the villain in The Regulators.

The fictional film that the book is named after, "The Regulators", is later mentioned in The Wolves of the Calla.

Poplar Street, the setting of the book, is bordered on one end by a "Bear Street". The Bear is an important plot element in The Dark Tower series, as the Beam that Roland's group follows is along the path of the Bear and Turtle.

Bag of Bones[edit]

In Bag of Bones, Mike Noonan seems to be going "todash' when he visits the Fryeburg Fair. The number 19 is used in the clues given to Mike. Sara Laughs is the twin to Cara Laughs, a location in Song of Susannah and The Dark Tower. Ralph Roberts from Insomnia (which is related to the Dark Tower series) also makes an appearance, and the area around Sara Laughs is described as where the world is thin. Dark Score lake could be that universe's location for the Dark Tower.

Hearts in Atlantis[edit]

Hearts in Atlantis centers on characters named Ted Brautigan and Bobby Garfield. In the seventh book of the series, Ted is an ally to Roland's Ka-Tet. Bobby Garfield is possibly Jake Chambers' "twinner." The Low Men are also the people who are after Ted Brautigan. Father Callahan tells a story of his encounter with them.

Black House[edit]

The Crimson King is in Black House. Parkus makes reference to the Dark Tower, Roland's quest, and his creation of new gunslingers. Tyler Marshall is said to be an extremely strong Breaker and the Crimson King's plans for him are discussed. Ted Brautigan is also mentioned in passing as a Breaker. Not named as such, the tent of the Little Sisters of Eluria shows up in The Territories.

Everything's Eventual[edit]

The collection Everything's Eventual, published in 2002, contains two novellas directly connected to the Dark Tower series. The first one, "Everything's Eventual", is the story of Dinky Earnshaw, a secondary character who becomes prominent in the seventh book. The second, "The Little Sisters of Eluria", is a sort of prequel to the entire series, describing a young Roland Deschain.

From a Buick 8[edit]

The Buick featured in From a Buick 8 is left behind at a petrol station by a person who fits the description of a Low Man. Also, the narrator, Sandy Dearborn, has the same surname as Roland Deschain's alias in the fourth book of the series: Will Dearborn.

Ur[edit]

Two Low Men in Yellow Coats make an appearance and mention the Tower and the Rose. An image of the Tower is also seen on the screen of an E-book which can search the multiverse.

Minor connections[edit]

Firestarter[edit]

The main protagonist, Charlie McGee, shares her name with the word for death in Rolands world, "Char".

Cell[edit]

Late in Cell, the protagonists stumble across a half-assembled carnival, which includes a child's ride called "Charlie the Choo-Choo", a reference to the third and fourth books in the series. Also, the graphic novel Clay sells at the beginning of the novel is entitled The Dark Wanderer, and the main antagonist, the Raggedy Man, wears a red hoodie from Harvard, a reference to the Crimson King. The protagonist, Ray Damon, has the same initials as the main character in The Dark Tower, Roland Deschain.

As well, the character Alice, who perishes from a trauma to the head, is a twinner to the bartender Alice, who slept with Roland.

The Dead Zone[edit]

Nigel, the robot in The Dark Tower 7, was reading The Dead Zone and found it "quite enjoyable". He plays number 19 on the roulette to win the big lot. Johnny is described by a construction worker at the fair as "long, tall, and ugly," which is how Eddie describes Roland.

Cujo[edit]

In The Dark Tower 7, the movie Cujo is directly referenced by character Bryan Smith, who mentions the title to the Stephen King character as they wait for an ambulance to arrive. Bryan describes the movie as "Scary as hell! I'm glad that little boy lived!" To which King replies "In the book he died." This refers to the fact that the boy died in the book but not the movie, but may also suggest a minor connection to the boy Jake Chambers of The Dark Tower series.

Blockade Billy[edit]

Billy, who has murderous tendencies, wears Number 19.

Full Dark, No Stars[edit]

In Fair Extension, Dave Streeter says to Tom Goodhugh, "Long days and pleasant nights". Streeter also shares a last name with a character from The Dark Tower: The Wind Through the Keyhole.

Under the Dome[edit]

Roger Killian, a small-time chicken farmer, has three sons, two of whom are named Randall and Roland, which are both prominent names in The Dark Tower.

Stephen King utilizes the "See this well" literary device that is used in the Dark Tower series.

The security code for the radio station is 1693. The sum of these numbers is 19.

They take the number 19 bus.

The "Great Bear" constellation is mentioned.

11/22/63[edit]

In 11/22/63, in the alternate 2011, the presence of the Takuro Spirit car is mentioned.

The main character Jake Epping uses the phrase "He remembered it very well," a variation of a common literary device throughout the Dark Tower series.

In Wolves of the Calla, the ka-tet discusses the possible use of the doorway cave to go to other times and change history, with their most discussed possibility being to prevent Kennedy's assassination, but decide that it would be a bad idea because of potentially worse future events. The station in Fedic depicted in Song of Susannah and The Dark Tower also has a specific door dedicated to visiting Dallas, 11/22/63, as if it were a tourist destination (another leads to Ford's Theater on the night of Lincoln's assassination). These doors, locked to a specific time, may be of a similar design as the one in the pantry that Jake Epping uses to travel to 1958.

The Long Walk[edit]

In part one of the Skin-Man of The Wind Through the Keyhole, Peter McVries is mentioned as a deceased associate of Steven Deschain of Gilead. This character shares a name with a walker in The Long Walk, written as Richard Bachman.

Just After Sunset[edit]

In the short story N., a seemingly mentally ill man obsessed with numbers describes the number 19 as being powerful but dangerous.

The Colorado Kid[edit]

King noted on his personal website on October 7, 2005 that an apparent research error in his novel The Colorado Kid regarding the rise of Seattle, Washington-based Starbucks Coffee may hold other implications: "The review of The Colorado Kid in today’s issue of today's USA Today mentions that there was no Starbucks in Denver in 1980. Don’t assume that’s a mistake on my part. The constant readers of the Dark Tower series may realize that is not necessarily a continuity error, but a clue."

NOS4A2[edit]

The novel by Joe Hill (son of Stephen King) contains numerous references to The Dark Tower and other King works. The main antagonist, Charlie Manx, mentions knowing about "the doors to Mid-World". The town of Derry, ME is mentioned, as is Shawshank Prison.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Connections (The Dark Tower official website)