Stephen Martin (Australian politician)

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The Honourable
Dr Stephen Martin
21st Speaker of the Australian House of Representatives
In office
4 May 1993 – 30 April 1996
Preceded by Leo McLeay
Succeeded by Bob Halverson
Member of the Australian Parliament
for Cunningham
In office
13 March 1993 – 16 August 2002
Preceded by Stewart West
Succeeded by Michael Organ
Member of the Australian Parliament
for Macarthur
In office
1 December 1984 – 13 March 1993
Preceded by Colin Hollis
Succeeded by Chris Haviland
Personal details
Born (1948-06-24) 24 June 1948 (age 66)
Wollongong, New South Wales
Nationality Australian
Political party Australian Labor Party
Occupation Teacher, lecturer

Dr Stephen Paul Martin (born 24 June 1948) is a former Australian politician and senior academic. He served as an Australian Labor Party (ALP) member of the Australian House of Representatives for the seat of Macarthur, south west of Sydney, from 1984–1993; and, following redistribution, represented Cunningham from 1993 until his resignation in 2002.

Early life[edit]

Martin was born in Wollongong, New South Wales and received a BA at the Australian National University, an MA at the University of Alberta, a Master of Town and Country Planning at the University of Sydney, a Diploma of Education at the University of New South Wales and a PhD at the University of Wollongong. Prior to entering parliament, Martin served as a high school teacher with the New South Wales Department of Education, a lecturer at the University of Wollongong, and a Town Planner with the NSW Department of Environment and Planning serving as Regional Manager for the Macarthur Region. He also served as an Alderman on Wollongong City Council from 1983–1985.[1]

Rugby league career[edit]

Martin had a successful career as a rugby league referee and administrator.

In 1984 Martin refereed the Illawarra Rugby League first grade grand final,[2] a feat that was subsequently acknowledged in Hansard.[3] Martin was also the Referees' Association Treasurer in 1979–80 and Secretary in 1981–82.[4]

Martin subsequently became a director of the Illawarra Steelers. He resigned from the board of directors in 1995 in protest of the club's refusal to open talks with News Limited during the Super League War and the sacking of coach Graham Murray.

Political career[edit]

Martin served as Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister for Foreign Affairs and Trade from 27 December 1991 to 24 March 1993 and was elected Speaker of the Australian House of Representatives on 4 May 1993, a position that he held until the election of the Howard government in 1996.[1]

Martin resigned on 16 August 2002 causing a by-election which was subsequently won by Michael Organ running for the Australian Greens.

After politics[edit]

After a period as President of the University of Wollongong campus in Dubai, Martin took the position of Pro Vice-Chancellor (International) at Victoria University in Melbourne in January 2005.[5] His major contributions were to transform Victoria University's international operations and to create Victoria University International (VUI) as a unit of the University.[citation needed]

In March 2008 Martin became Deputy Vice Chancellor (Strategy and Planning) at Curtin University of Technology in Perth. In April 2009 he took up the position of Senior Consultant with the Slade Group in Melbourne.[5]

In June 2010, Martin joined the Southern Cross University Graduate College of Management in the role of Professor of Business Research and director of the Doctor of Business Administration (DBA) program[6] and left in November 2010.

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "Biography for Martin, the Hon. Dr Stephen Paul". Parliament of Australia. Retrieved 26 January 2010. 
  2. ^ "First Grade Grand Final Referees". Illawarra Division Rugby League Referees Association. Retrieved 22 August 2010. 
  3. ^ Crawford, Mary (4 May 1993). "Speaker: Election". Hansard. Retrieved 22 August 2010. 
  4. ^ "Past Office Bearers". Illawarra Division Rugby League Referees Association. Retrieved 22 August 2010. 
  5. ^ a b "Appointment of the new Deputy Vice-Chancellor Strategy and Planning". Curtin University of Technology. 18 January 2008. Retrieved 26 January 2010. [dead link]
  6. ^ http://discover.scu.edu.au/2010/issue6/index.php/7
Parliament of Australia
Preceded by
Colin Hollis
Member for Macarthur
1984–1993
Succeeded by
Chris Haviland
Preceded by
Stewart West
Member for Cunningham
1993–2002
Succeeded by
Michael Organ
Preceded by
Leo McLeay
Speaker of the Australian House of Representatives
1993–1996
Succeeded by
Bob Halverson