Steve Anderson (director)

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Steve Anderson
Man with beard and glasses wearing dress shirt and jacket
Steve Anderson in 2013
Nationality American
Alma mater Nazareth College
Occupation Film director
Years active 1987–present
Known for The Big Empty
Fuck
The River Murders

Steve Anderson is a film director, writer, and producer. After graduating with an undergraduate degree from Nazareth College in Rochester, New York, he gained experience as a television cameraman. He made documentary films for PBS, and won a Peabody Award for Safe Haven in 1987. He moved to Los Angeles, California in 1989 and worked for CNN.

Anderson made his feature film directorial debut in 2003 with The Big Empty starring Daryl Hannah and Jon Favreau. He directed the documentary film Fuck, which features commentary by a variety of individuals, including Kevin Smith, Steven Bochco, Janeane Garofalo, Bill Maher, Drew Carey, and Alanis Morissette.

Early life and education[edit]

Anderson was raised in Pittsford, New York.[1] He received an undergraduate degree from Nazareth College in Rochester, New York.[1] He worked as a cameraman for WXXI-TV.[1]

Career[edit]

Steve Anderson gained experience in filmmaking while directing documentary films for PBS.[2] One of these productions for PBS titled Safe Haven earned him recognition with a Peabody Award in 1987.[1][2] In 1989, Anderson moved to Los Angeles, California.[2] He worked for CNN in California.[1]

Anderson made his feature film directorial debut in 2003 with the film The Big Empty starting Daryl Hannah and Jon Favreau.[3][4]

He directed the documentary film Fuck, which features commentary by a variety of individuals, including Kevin Smith, Steven Bochco, Janeane Garofalo, Chuck D., Ron Jeremy, Bill Maher, Michael Medved, Alan Keyes, Judith Martin, Drew Carey, Alanis Morissette, Ice T, Pat Boone, and Billy Connolly.[5][6][7]

Filmography[edit]

Year Film Director Writer Producer Other Notes
2003 The Big Empty Yes Yes
2004 Promised Land Yes
2005 Fuck Yes Yes Yes Yes Voice actor
2011 The River Murders Yes Yes
2013 This Last Lonely Place Yes Yes Yes
2014 The White Orchid Yes Yes Yes

Awards[edit]

Year Work Award Organization Result
1987 Safe Haven, PBS documentary film Peabody Award Henry W. Grady College of Journalism and Mass Communication at the University of Georgia Won[1][2]
2003 The Big Empty Sonoma Valley Film Festival Audience Award for Best Feature Sonoma Valley Film Festival Won[1]
2004 Promised Land Golden Leopard Locarno International Film Festival Nominated[8]
2012 The River Murders Festival Award: Best Feature Film Hoboken International Film Festival Won[9]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f g Doser, Mike (2003). "Also playing... Local boy makes good (film)". Rochester City Newspaper (Rochester, New York). Retrieved June 7, 2013. 
  2. ^ a b c d Garner, Jack (Gannett News Service) (January 9, 2007). "What did they say? Swear word is focus of new documentary". USA Today (Arlington, Virginia). p. ARC. 
  3. ^ Garner, Jack (January 4, 2007). "'Naughty word' intrigues Pittsford grad". Democrat and Chronicle (Rochester, New York: Gannett Company). Retrieved April 25, 2013. 
  4. ^ Punter, Jennie (December 1, 2006). "Four Letters, Two Stars". The Globe and Mail (Canada: CTVglobemedia Publishing Inc.). p. R17; Section: The Globe Review 7; film. 
  5. ^ French, Karl (February 11, 2009). "The slow road to revelation". The Financial Times (The Financial Times Ltd.). Retrieved April 17, 2013. 
  6. ^ Garner, Jack (January 5, 2007). "'F---: The Documentary'". Democrat and Chronicle (Gannett). Retrieved April 17, 2013. 
  7. ^ Baumgarten, Marjorie (December 1, 2006). "F*ck". The Austin Chronicle (Austin Chronicle Corp.). Retrieved April 17, 2013. 
  8. ^ "Awards for Promised Land". IMDb (IMDb.com, Inc.). 2013. Retrieved June 7, 2013. 
  9. ^ "Awards for The River Murders". IMDb (IMDb.com, Inc.). 2013. Retrieved June 7, 2013. 

External links[edit]