Steve Aylett

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Steve Aylett
Born 1967
Occupation Novelist
Nationality British
Period 1994 -
Genre Satirical science fiction and slipstream
Website
http://www.steveaylett.com

Steve Aylett (b. 1967 in Bromley, United Kingdom) is a satirical science fiction and slipstream author (most recently adopted by the bizarro movement). He is renowned for his colorful satire attacking the manipulations of authority, for creating many epigrams and for his non-neurotypical characters who do not react as expected.

Biography[edit]

Aylett left school at age 17 and worked in a book warehouse, and later in law publishing.[citation needed]

A synesthete, Aylett claims to have books appear in his brain in one visual "glob" which looks like a piece of gum.[1]

Bibliography[edit]

Beerlight[edit]

The Beerlight novels and some of Toxicology are set in a supposedly future dystopian town called Beerlight, apparently modelled on Baltimore.

Accomplice[edit]

Only an Alligator, The Velocity Gospel, Dummyland, and Karloff's Circus are set in Accomplice, a suburb on a tropical peninsula in a perhaps nuclear-blasted future, underneath which live demons. Aylett says he is in the tradition of "real satirists" such as Voltaire, Jonathan Swift and Mark Twain. The four books are collected in THE COMPLETE ACCOMPLICE (2010, Scar Garden Press)

Lint[edit]

'Lint' is a satirical, Zelig-like biography of an imaginary author. The book traces his career through thinly disguised satires on a number of well-known writers from the late 20th Century, including Philip K. Dick, Hunter S Thompson and Ken Kesey. A no-budget movie of the book (incorporating the other Lint book 'And Your Point Is?') has been produced by Aylett, edited by Electric Children - screenings in UK and US commenced in 2011. LINT THE MOVIE on youtube.

Comic books[edit]

He has written issue #27 of Tom Strong and a comic called The Nerve, as well as visual artifacts such as Jeff Lint's comic The Caterer.[2] Newer projects include The Promissory for Arthur magazine’s ‘mimeo’ line, now published independently at lulu.com, and the surreal and colorful Get That Thing Away From Me. A strip titled 'Johnny Viable' has appeared in Alan Moore's print magazine Dodgem Logic.

Awards and nominations[edit]

Slaughtermatic was shortlisted for the Philip K. Dick Award in 1998.

Winner of the Jack Trevor Story Award in 2006.

Notes[edit]

References[edit]

External links[edit]

Interviews[edit]