Steve Beren

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Steve Beren (born September 9, 1951) is an American political activist from Seattle, Washington.

Early life and education[edit]

Born in New York City, Beren says that he was raised in a nominal Jewish home, later became an atheist and, in 1995, a Christian.[1]

Political activism[edit]

Socialist Workers Party[edit]

Until 1990 Beren was a member of the Socialist Workers Party (SWP),[2][3]

While living in Detroit in the 1970s, Beren was questioned by the FBI who were investigating his roommate at the time, a Young Socialist Alliance partisan suspected of subversive activities. According to a congressional report of that incident, the roommate had previously been harassed by a "person claiming to be a congressman on the House Internal Security committee" who had insinuated knowledge of an "undisclosed purpose" behind the roommate and Beren's relocation from New York; the purported congressman claimed the move was done at the behest of the SWP for purposes of infiltration and agitprop.[4]

Beren left the SWP in 1990 due to, what he described as, "exhaustion with it." [2]

Democratic Party[edit]

After leaving the SWP, Beren became a member of the Democratic Party, where he remained for the next fourteen years.[3]

Republican Party[edit]

Beren quit the Democratic Party to become a Republican. He is a self-identified "Tea Party activist" and was an early confederate of Tea Party founder Keli Carender. The success of Carender's first event, a 2009 rally in Seattle against the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009, has been partly attributed to promotion it received on Beren's blog.[5] Beren went on to organize and speak at other Tea Party rallies.[6]

Beren has said that Republicans should "have bold colors, wave the Republican flag boldly; wave fiscal conservatism, social conservatism, immigration conservatism — boldly."[7] During the 2012 GOP presidential primaries, Beren endorsed Newt Gingrich.[8][9] He has called for fortifying the U.S.' southern border with Mexico[10] and was a supporter of the 2003 Iraq War.[11]

In 2006, and again in 2008, Beren ran for U.S. House of Representatives from Washington's 7th congressional district, advancing to the general election on the Republican ticket in the heavily Democratic-leaning district. In both races he was soundly defeated by incumbent Jim McDermott, scoring roughly 16-percent of the vote each time[12][13] while being thoroughly outspent by his rival (McDermott spent $1 million during the 2008 election, compared to $32,850 invested by Beren's campaign[14]). In 2010 he again ran for congress from Washington's 7th congressional district, that time as a declared write-in candidate.[15]

As of 2014, Beren is the New Media and Technology Director for the Washington State Republican Party.[16]

Personal information[edit]

Beren has lived in Seattle since 1987, and is married.[1]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Beren, Steve (May 9, 2005 (slightly revised December 29, 2008)). "The Liberal Elite, Paranoia, Moral Values, and the War Against Terrorism (part 2 of 2)". Steve Beren. Retrieved 2009-10-14. 
  2. ^ a b Feit, Josh (September 2011). "McKenna Consultant is Original Local Tea Party Activist and Former Socialist". Seattle Metropolitan Magazine. Retrieved 15 May 2014. 
  3. ^ a b Ramsey, Bruce (August 9, 2006). "McDermott challenger knows a little something about the left". Seattle Times. Retrieved 2009-10-14. 
  4. ^ U.S. Intelligence Agencies and Activities: Hearings Before the Select Committee on Intelligence. Government Printing Office. 1975. p. 1176. 
  5. ^ Maltsev, Yuri (2013). The Tea Party Explained: From Crisis to Crusade. Open Court. p. 71. ISBN 0812698312. 
  6. ^ Ward, Don (April 16, 2009). "Tea Party Post Mortem". Seattle Weekly. Retrieved 2009-10-14. 
  7. ^ Springer, Dan (June 24, 2008). "Washington State Republicans Ditch Party Labels to Compete". Fox News. Retrieved 2009-10-14. [dead link]
  8. ^ The Conservative Alternative to President Obama
  9. ^ Newt 2012 Announces Washington State Endorsements
  10. ^ Pratt, Christine (September 27, 2013). "Roundtable spotlights contrasting views on immigration reform". Wenatchee World. Retrieved 2013-09-28. 
  11. ^ Connelly, Joel (September 10, 2007). "Beren for Congress". Seattle Post-Intelligencer. Retrieved 2009-10-14. 
  12. ^ "November 2006 General". sos.wa.gov. Washington Secretary of State. 
  13. ^ "Congressional District 7". sos.wa.gov. Washington Secretary of State. 
  14. ^ Beckel, Michael (30 June 2009). "Democratic Doc Favors Single-Payer Health Care For All". opensecrets.org. Open Secrets. Retrieved 15 May 2014. 
  15. ^ Gilmore, Susan (9 August 2010). "Rep. Jim McDermott facing six challengers". Seattle Times. Retrieved 2009-10-14. 
  16. ^ "Party Staff". wsrp.org. Washington State Republican Party. Retrieved 15 May 2014. 

External links[edit]