Steve Crosby

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For the person in the music industry, see Steve Crosby (music).
Steve Crosby
Coach/Running back
Personal information
Date of birth: (1950-07-03) July 3, 1950 (age 64)
Place of birth: Great Bend, Kansas
Height: 5 ft 11 in (1.80 m) Weight: 205 lb (93 kg)
Career information
High school: Pawnee Rock High School
College: Fort Hays State
NFL Draft: 1974 / Round: 17 / Pick: 419
Debuted in 1974 for the New York Giants
Last played in 1976 for the New York Giants
Career history
 As player:
 As coach:
Career highlights and awards
Career NFL statistics
Stats at NFL.com
Stats at pro-football-reference.com

Steven Kent "Steve" Crosby (born July 3, 1950) is an American football coach and retired National Football League (NFL) running back. He last coached special teams for the San Diego Chargers in 2010. Crosby was named the NFL Special Teams Coach of the Year in 2007, and he has spent 33 years in the NFL—3 as a player, 4 as a scout and 26 as a coach. He played for the New York Giants from 1974–1976. Afterwards he scouted or coached in the NFL for the Miami Dolphins, Atlanta Falcons, Cleveland Browns, New England Patriots and the Philadelphia Eagles. He then coached college football for three years at Vanderbilt University before joining the Chargers in 2002.

College career[edit]

Crosby played college football for Fort Hays State, where he was an Associated Press Little All-American (1973), two-time National Association of Intercollegiate Athletics (NAIA) All-District 10 (1972–1973), and two-time All-Great Plains Athletic Conference selection (1972–1973).[1][2][3] The tailback finished his career with 2,780 rushing yards and 27 touchdowns while also filling in for injured teammates at quarterback and middle linebacker.[4]

Professional playing career[edit]

Crosby was selected by the New York Giants in the 17th round of the 1974 NFL Draft.[5] He was one of the few 17th round picks to ever make an NFL team after reporting to training camp in his best ever physical condition.[4] The 1974 NFL strike also may have helped as veterans missed training camp.[4] Stomach and knee injuries impacted Crosby's first year.[4] He played three seasons with the Giants and retired following the 1976 season after a serious knee injury.[6]

Coaching career[edit]

Crosby recovered from his injury and earned his master's degree. Three weeks after accepting a position to teach high school, he was offered to be a scout for the Miami Dolphins.[6] He accepted, and later became a coach under Don Shula. The Dolphins went to Super Bowl XVII in 1982. Crosby then coached for the Atlanta Falcons, Cleveland Browns, New England Patriots and the Philadelphia Eagles. In 1985 with the Browns, Crosby was the running backs coach that oversaw both Earnest Byner and Kevin Mack both running for 1,000 yards.[2]

Crosby joined the Chargers in 2002 as special teams coach under their new incoming head coach, Marty Schottenheimer.[7] Crosby was honored as the 2007 NFL Special Teams Coach of the Year by Professional Kicking Services.[8][9] His kickoff strategy with the Chargers emphasized placement of the ball—forcing the return team to one side of the field—as a tradeoff for the distance of the kick.[10] During his Chargers tenure, four special team players were selected to the Pro Bowl including covermen Kassim Osgood (3-time selection) and Hanik Milligan, kicker Nate Kaeding (2-times) and long snapper David Binn.[2] Additionally, punter Mike Scifres was a Pro Bowl first-alternate four times, and kick returner Darren Sproles was a first-alternate once and a second alternate twice.[2] Kaeding, who started his NFL career under Crosby, was the NFL’s most accurate kicker of all-time as of the end of the 2010 season, converting 86.5% of his field goals attempts.[2][11]

The San Diego Union-Tribune wrote that Crosby's special teams unit in 2010 was "by some measures the worst special teams season in NFL history."[7] The Chargers allowed touchdowns on three kickoffs and one punt, and had four punts blocked and another deflected.[8] As of 2010, two teams since 1994 had allowed more kickoff returns for touchdowns and five allowed as many as the Chargers. Two teams had allowed more blocked punts, and none since 1976 surrendered a punt return average higher than the Chargers' 18.9 yards.[7] Crosby was unable to get a group of inexperienced players to play at an acceptable level.[12] Some team members said it was time for a change after listening to Crosby for nine years, and his contract was not renewed after the season.[7][13]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Prickett, Ryan (2011). "2011 Fort Hays State Football Media Guide". Fort Hays State. pp. 90, 92. Retrieved September 16, 2011. 
  2. ^ a b c d e "2010 San Diego Chargers Media Guide" (PDF). San Diego Chargers. 2010. p. 16. Archived from the original on September 15, 2011. 
  3. ^ Mulligan, Kevin (May 22, 1996). "Daniels Hires Pair Of Scouts Dick Daniels: New System". Philadelphia Daily News. Archived from the original on September 16, 2011. 
  4. ^ a b c d Keating, Bob (January 12, 1975). "Crosby See Future With Giants". The Great Bend Tribune. Retrieved September 16, 2011. 
  5. ^ "Steve Crosby NFL & AFL Football Statistics". Pro-Football-Reference.com. Retrieved September 16, 2011. 
  6. ^ a b Hanks, Kathy (December 12, 2008). "Charger is chief attraction". The Hutchinson News. Archived from the original on September 16, 2011. 
  7. ^ a b c d Acee, Kevin (January 3, 2011). "Crosby takes fall for special teams slide". The San Diego Union-Tribune. Archived from the original on September 15, 2011. 
  8. ^ a b Bair, Scott (January 3, 2011). "CHARGERS NOTES: Special teams coach Crosby won't return". North County Times. Archived from the original on September 15, 2011. 
  9. ^ Jensen, Sean (March 27, 2008). "Toub snubbed for special teams award - Inside the Bears". Chicago Sun-Times. Archived from the original on September 15, 2011. 
  10. ^ Sullivan, Tim (August 11, 2011). "NFL fans may want to give new kickoff rule the boot". The San Diego Union-Tribune. Archived from the original on September 15, 2011. 
  11. ^ "Chargers K Kaeding out for season after hurting left knee on opening kickoff". The Washington Post. Associated Press. September 12, 2011. Archived from the original on September 15, 2011. 
  12. ^ Acee, Kevin (January 4, 2011). "Along with new coach, Bolts need new (old) mentality on special teams". The San Diego Union-Tribune. Archived from the original on September 16, 2011. 
  13. ^ Trotter, Jim (August 31, 2011). "Chargers hope to rebound after playoff-less 2010". SI.com (CNN/Sports Illustrated). Archived from the original on September 15, 2011. 

External links[edit]