Steve Fossey

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Steve Fossey is a Senior Teaching Fellow at University College London (UCL) in the Department of Physics and Astronomy's University of London Observatory.[1] He is known as co-discoverer of the transit of planet HD 80606b along with Ingo Waldmann and David Kipping.[2][3] The transit of this Jupiter-sized planet, with its distinctive elliptical orbit around HD 80606, its parent star, was first sighted on 14 February 2009. Fossey's most recent discovery took place on 21 January 2014, when he, along with a team of four students (Ben Cooke/Guy Pollack/Matthew Wilde/Thomas Wright), discovered supernova SN 2014J[4] in Messier 82 (The Cigar Galaxy). Fossey continues his research in Extrasolar Planets.

Education[edit]

Steve Fossey studied at University College London (UCL), receiving his Bachelor of Science with Honours in 1983. This was followed in 1990 by a PhD in Astronomy (also at UCL).[1] Fossey joined UCL on 01/04/1992 and became part of the Research Group at ULO (University of London Observatory).

Research and publications[edit]

The areas of research that Fossey takes most interest in are Extrasolar Planets, Interstellar Medium, Molecular Astrophysics, and Diffuse Interstellar Bands.[5] He has co-authored over 30 abstracts covering these subjects in the past decade.[6] Fossey's "Pathways towards Habitable Moons" - written along with co-authors David Kipping (also co-discoverer of planet HD 80606b), G. Campanella, J. Schneider, and G. Tinetti - combines his scientific and philosophical passions stating reasons why the search for life outside our solar system should not be restricted to planetary bodies, but should also include the moons (exomoons) of extrasolar planets. Fossey is now an editor of The Observatory magazine founded 1877. Well known by astronomers in the UK, professional as well as amateur, it has served as a journal of scientific notes and papers, old and new, as well as reporting the meetings of the Royal Astronomical Society.[7]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "profile". Ucl.ac.uk. Retrieved 2014-01-25. 
  2. ^ "systemic". Oklo.org. Retrieved 2014-01-25. 
  3. ^ "European Week of Astronomy and Space Sciences - Press Releases". Star-www.herts.ac.uk. Retrieved 2014-01-25. 
  4. ^ "Supernova in Messier 82 discovered by UCL students". Ucl.ac.uk. Retrieved 2014-01-25. 
  5. ^ "London's Global University". UCL. 2013-12-19. Retrieved 2014-01-25. 
  6. ^ "Sao/Nasa Ads: Ads Home Page". Adsabs.harvard.edu. Retrieved 2014-01-25. 
  7. ^ "The Observatory Magazine". Ulo.ucl.ac.uk. Retrieved 2014-01-25.