Steve Nardelli

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Steve Nardelli
Steve Nardelli.jpg
Steve Nardelli performs at The Marquee, London, November 2005, with The Syn
Background information
Birth name Stephen Louis Nardelli
Born (1948-04-10) 10 April 1948 (age 66)
Origin London, England
Genres Progressive rock, Pop rock
Occupations Musician, singer, songwriter
Instruments Guitar, vocals
Years active 1965–present
Labels Deram Records
Umbrello Records
Associated acts The Syn
Website Official website

Stephen Louis "Steve" Nardelli (born 10 April 1948 in London) founded The Syn in 1966 with Chris Squire, Andrew Jackman, John Painter and Martyn Adelman. In 1968, Nardelli left The Syn to carve out a business career in the fashion and sports industries before reforming the band in 2003 with Adelman and Peter Banks. Banks left the reunited band, but Squire joined and the band recorded a new album, Syndestructible. An interviewer for 20th Century Guitar magazine described Syndestructible as "one of the best prog-rock albums of the new century" and "a masterpiece of beat-prog."[1]

Musician[edit]

Nardelli’s musicianship started around the age of twelve when he began playing the guitar.[2] These were the years British Pop was in full swing[3] and The Beatles, The Who and The Animals were his influences early on.

Inspired by the scene at the Marquee Club, noteworthy for its importance in the history of pop music,[4] at fourteen Nardelli formed his first group called High Court, an R&B band. Not long after, High Court changed its name and amalgamated into The Syn with Chris Squire, Andrew Pryce Jackman, Martyn Adelman and John Painter.

The songsmith[edit]

The Syn are considered a significant part of the pre-history of Yes; notably the progressive influences.[5]

Nardelli's first composition was "Grounded", a freakbeat song that became a classic he wrote when he was only 14. He co-wrote "14 Hour Technicolour Dream" in 1967, which was reviewed as “one of the best British psychedelic singles by any band.”[6] Both were singles performed by The Syn.

Nardelli continued to write music after The Syn of the 60s and had a solo recording contract with Decca. Nardelli reformed The Syn with Peter Banks and Martyn Adelman in 2004. The line-up changed, re-uniting Nardelli with Chris Squire, and together they wrote Syndestructible (2005) with Gerard Johnson and Paul Stacey. This was followed by the album Armistice Day, the title track being written by Nardelli and Johnson. Squire, Johnson and Stacey all left the band, and Nardelli formed a new line-up with Francis Dunnery and Tom Brislin. They released Big Sky in 2009.

Nardelli is currently working in collaboration with Swedish band Moon Safari on a new album from The Syn called Trustworks.

Business[edit]

After The Syn disbanded, Nardelli, along with his partner Ian Ross, opened a chain of fashion shops in Chelsea and Kensington.

Continuing a connection with the music industry, Nardelli teamed with Tommy Roberts Mr Freedom , well known for his fashion shop Mr. Freedom[7][8] and launched a record label, Fresh Records through WEA.[9]

In 1997, Nardelli acquired from the government of Belgium's Walloon region the Donnay sports brand.[10] Nardelli also founded Umbrello Records, and the IPTV music station theONE.tv.

In 2009, Nardelli formed P3 (Portfolio Property Partners) with Graham Johnson and Ian Inshaw. The company is one of the new eco developers and their site at NW Bicester [11] was selected by Government to be one of the 4 new eco towns. The Master Plan architect for the project is Sir Terry Farrell and the town will be built with full eco credentials and to the new code 6 standards set by Government. Work starts on the development in 2014 and it will be the first eco town to be built.[12]


Discography[edit]

With The Syn

Main article: The Syn: discography

Solo singles

  • "I'll Never Find Another You"/"Mile End Road" - Decca/1978
  • "Don't Ever Change"/"Dance Little Rita" - Decca/1978

With 14 Hour Technicolour Dream V-band

  • "Reasons & Rituals" - download/2008

References[edit]

External links[edit]