Sthène

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The sthène (symbol sn), sometimes spelled (or misspelled) sthéne[1] or sthene[2] (from the Greek σθένος (sthenos) meaning "force"[3]), is an obsolete unit of force or thrust in the metre–tonne–second system of units (mts) introduced in France in 1919.[4] When proposed by the British Association in 1876, it was called the funal, but the name was changed by 1914.[1] The mts system was soon abandoned in favour of the mks system and has now been superseded by the Système International (SI).[2]

one sthène = 1 kilonewton[5]
102.0 kilograms-force
224.8 pounds force
7233 poundals

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Fenna, Donald (2002). "m. t. s. system". A Dictionary Of Weights, Measures, and Units. Oxford, England: Oxford University Press. p. 281. ISBN 019-860522-6. sthéne force. Symbol sn. Metric-m.t.s. That which produces an acceleration of 1 m·s−2 when applied to a mass of 1 t[onne] = 1 kN. Originally called the funal when proposed by the British Association in 1876, it was renamed by 1914. It was authorized in France by statute of 1919 as part of the m–t–s system. 
  2. ^ a b Fenna, Donald (2002). "m. t. s. system". A Dictionary Of Weights, Measures, and Units. Oxford, England: Oxford University Press. p. 190. ISBN 019-860522-6. m.t.s system (Metric-m.t.s., also MTS system)…In the m.t.s. system the unit of force, for example, is the sthene, which gives an acceleration of 1 m·s−2 to a body of 1 t[onne]… 
  3. ^ Liddell, Henry; et al (1843). A new Greek and English lexicon. Oxford, England: Oxford University Press. p. 1343. OCLC 23249577. 
  4. ^ "New units in the metric system—legally adopted in France". Scientific American Monthly. New York: Scientific American. 1920. p. 152. ISSN 0740-6495. OCLC 1765222. 
  5. ^ International conversion tables Stephen Naft, Ralph De Sola, P. H. Bigg – 1965 "Sthène (sn) per square metre. This also equals 10000 dyn/cm2."