Sticks Evans

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Sticks Evans
Genres Jazz, Blues
Occupations Musician
Instruments Drums
Years active 1948-1994

Samuel "Sticks" Evans (1923-1994) was a drummer, percussionist, music teacher, arranger and musical director.[1] He was credited variously as Sammy "Stick" Evans, Samie Evans, Sammy Evans, Sammie Evans, Belton Evans, Stick Evans, and Sticks Evans.

Biography[edit]

In 1950, he recorded with the Milt Buckner Orchestra backing Wynonie Harris, and in 1952-3 he was playing and recording with Milt Buckner's Organ Trio. He left the trio in February 1953,[2] and in 1954 he was with the Teddy Wilson Trio with Milt Hinton.[3]

In the early 1960s, he was recording on the Prestige label, credited as Belton Evans, and accompanied on bass by Leonard Gaskin, for blues artists such as Curtis Jones, Sunnyland Slim,[4] Sonny Terry,[5] Big John Greer, LaVern Baker,[6] and King Curtis.[7]

He appears on John LewisJazz Abstractions album (1961), with Bill Evans, Eric Dolphy, Ornette Coleman and Jim Hall, among others.[8] That same year he was a member of the Ray Bryant Combo backing Aretha Franklin on her second album, Aretha: With The Ray Bryant Combo.

His pupils included Bernard Purdie,[9] Max Neuhaus,[10] and Terry Burrus.[11]

Discography[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ “From the Music Capitals of the World” 20 March 1971 Billboard. Retrieved 1 April 2013.
  2. ^ Büttner, Armin (2011) The Recorded Works of Milt Buckner: Part I: 1941 - 1963 Retrieved 1 April 2013.
  3. ^ Teddy Wilson Discography Retrieved 1 April 2013.
  4. ^ Blues Discography Retrieved 1 April 2013.
  5. ^ Sonny Terry Discography Retrieved 1 April 2013.
  6. ^ Mike Leadbitter, Neil Slaven (1987) Blues records, 1943-1970: a selective discography. Record Information Services at Google Books. Retrieved 1 April 2013.
  7. ^ Simonds, R. (1983) King Curtis, a discography at Google Books. Retrieved 1 April 2013.
  8. ^ Morton, Brian and Cook, Richard (2010) The Penguin Jazz Guide: The History of the Music in the 1000 Best Albums at Google Books. Retrieved 1 April 2013.
  9. ^ Chadbourne, Eugene. Biography at allmusic allmusic. Retrieved 1 April 2013.
  10. ^ Biography Max Neuhaus's official website. Retrieved 1 April 2013.
  11. ^ "Commissioning innovation" The Prague Post. Retrieved 1 April 2013.