Sticky toffee pudding

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Sticky toffee pudding
StickyToffeePudding.jpg
Type Pudding
Course Dessert
Place of origin England
Region or state Cumbria, Lancashire
Main ingredients Sponge cake, dates, toffee
Cookbook:Sticky toffee pudding  Sticky toffee pudding

Sticky toffee pudding is an English steamed dessert[citation needed] consisting of a very moist sponge cake, made with finely chopped dates, covered in a toffee sauce and often served with a vanilla custard or vanilla ice-cream.[1] It is considered a modern British ‘classic’ by various British experts,[2][3] alongside Bread and butter pudding, Jam Roly-Poly and Spotted Dick puddings.

Origins[edit]

Francis Coulson developed and served this dessert at his Sharrow Bay Country House Hotel in the Lake District in the 1970s.[4] Food critic Simon Hopkinson claimed that Coulson told him he got the recipe from a Patricia Martin of Claughton in Lancashire.[5] Martin had published the recipe in a compilation that later became The Good Food Guide Dinner Party Book, and first served the dish at her country hotel. Coulson's recipe only differs from Martin's in the sauce.[6][5] Her son later told Hopkinson that she had originally got the recipe from two Canadian air force officers who had lodged at her hotel during the Second World War.[5] According to Hopkinson, this Canadian origin makes sense, as the pudding uses a batter more akin to that of an American muffin, rather than an English sponge.[5]

Production[edit]

One of the largest and best known producers of sticky toffee puddings is located in the village of Cartmel in Cumbria (Cartmel is also located in the traditional area known as "Lancashire Over The Sands"), called Cartmel Village Shop.[7] 2,000 sticky toffee puddings are made there each week.[7]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Sticky Toffee Pudding Recipe - RecipeWISE
  2. ^ Hopkinson, Simon (18 February 2008). "Mrs Martin's moment of genius". London: The Guardian/The Observer. Retrieved 28 February 2013. 
  3. ^ Grant, Richard E. "Sticky toffee pudding". BBC. Retrieved 28 February 2013. 
  4. ^ http://www.sharrowbay.co.uk/dining/stick-toffee-pudding
  5. ^ a b c d Simon Hopkinson updates the classic sticky toffee pud | Life and style | The Observer
  6. ^ Hopkinson, Simon (25 September 1999). "Food: By George, it's good". The Independent (London). 
  7. ^ a b Scotland on Sunday October 27, 2002, Sunday STICKY FINGERS BYLINE: Sue Lawrence

External links[edit]