Stockton, New Jersey

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Stockton, New Jersey
Borough
Borough of Stockton
Map of Stockton in Hunterdon County. Inset: Location of Hunterdon County highlighted in the State of New Jersey.
Map of Stockton in Hunterdon County. Inset: Location of Hunterdon County highlighted in the State of New Jersey.
Census Bureau map of Stockton, New Jersey
Census Bureau map of Stockton, New Jersey
Coordinates: 40°24′20″N 74°58′27″W / 40.405431°N 74.974176°W / 40.405431; -74.974176Coordinates: 40°24′20″N 74°58′27″W / 40.405431°N 74.974176°W / 40.405431; -74.974176[1][2]
Country United States
State New Jersey
County Hunterdon
Incorporated April 14, 1898
Government[5]
 • Type Borough
 • Mayor Stephen Giocondo (term ends December 31, 2015)[3]
 • Administrator / Clerk Michele Hovan[4]
Area[2]
 • Total 0.612 sq mi (1.584 km2)
 • Land 0.535 sq mi (1.386 km2)
 • Water 0.077 sq mi (0.198 km2)  12.52%
Elevation[6] 121 ft (37 m)
Population (2010 Census)[7][8][9][10]
 • Total 538
 • Estimate (2012[11]) 536
 • Rank 553rd of 566 in state
26th of 26 in county[12]
 • Density 1,005.6/sq mi (388.3/km2)
 • Density rank 381st of 566 in state
10th of 26 in county[12]
Time zone Eastern (EST) (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST) Eastern (EDT) (UTC-4)
ZIP code 08559[13][14]
Area code(s) 609 Exchanges: 397, 773[15]
FIPS code 3401970980[16][2][17]
GNIS feature ID 0885409[18][2]
Website None

Stockton is a borough in Hunterdon County, New Jersey, United States. The borough sits on the Delaware River at the western end of Amwell Valley. As of the 2010 United States Census, the borough's population was 538,[7][8][9] reflecting a decline of 22 (-3.9%) from the 560 counted in the 2000 Census, which had in turn declined by 69 (-11.0%) from the 629 counted in the 1990 Census.[19]

Stockton was incorporated as a borough by an Act of the New Jersey Legislature on April 14, 1898, from portions of Delaware Township.[20][21]

Geography[edit]

Stockton is located at 40°24′20″N 74°58′27″W / 40.405431°N 74.974176°W / 40.405431; -74.974176 (40.405431,-74.974176). According to the United States Census Bureau, the borough had a total area of 0.612 square miles (1.584 km2), of which, 0.535 square miles (1.386 km2) of it is land and 0.077 square miles (0.198 km2) of it (12.52%) is water.[1][2]

The borough borders Delaware Township. The Centre Bridge-Stockton Bridge, a free bridge over the Delaware River, owned and operated by the Delaware River Joint Toll Bridge Commission, connects Pennsylvania Route 32 and Pennsylvania Route 263 in Solebury Township, Pennsylvania to Route 29 in Stockton. The original bridge, constructed at the site formerly known as Reading's Ferry, was opened to traffic in the spring of 1814. The covered bridge was destroyed in a flood on January 8, 1841, striking the Lambertville Bridge on its way down the Delaware, as part of a flood that severely damaged every bridge between Easton, Pennsylvania and Trenton.[21]

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
1900 590
1910 605 2.5%
1920 519 −14.2%
1930 556 7.1%
1940 478 −14.0%
1950 488 2.1%
1960 520 6.6%
1970 619 19.0%
1980 643 3.9%
1990 629 −2.2%
2000 560 −11.0%
2010 538 −3.9%
Est. 2012 536 [11] −0.4%
Population sources: 1900-1920[22]
1900-1910[23] 1910-1930[24]
1930-1990[25] 2000[26][27] 2010[7][8][9]

Census 2010[edit]

At the 2010 United States Census, there were 538 people, 237 households, and 142 families residing in the borough. The population density was 1,005.6 per square mile (388.3 /km2). There were 259 housing units at an average density of 484.1 per square mile (186.9 /km2). The racial makeup of the borough was 98.33% (529) White, 0.00% (0) Black or African American, 0.00% (0) Native American, 0.93% (5) Asian, 0.00% (0) Pacific Islander, 0.00% (0) from other races, and 0.74% (4) from two or more races. Hispanics or Latinos of any race were 0.56% (3) of the population.[7]

There were 237 households, of which 23.2% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 48.5% were married couples living together, 7.2% had a female householder with no husband present, and 40.1% were non-families. 32.1% of all households were made up of individuals, and 11.8% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.27 and the average family size was 2.94.[7]

In the borough, 19.5% of the population were under the age of 18, 5.9% from 18 to 24, 21.4% from 25 to 44, 35.1% from 45 to 64, and 18.0% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 47.7 years. For every 100 females there were 94.2 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 96.8 males.[7]

The Census Bureau's 2006-2010 American Community Survey showed that (in 2010 inflation-adjusted dollars) median household income was $58,750 (with a margin of error of +/- $19,736) and the median family income was $72,321 (+/- $19,152). Males had a median income of $61,250 (+/- $24,259) versus $42,273 (+/- $34,015) for females. The per capita income for the borough was $38,153 (+/- $7,749). About 0.0% of families and 5.4% of the population were below the poverty line, including 0.0% of those under age 18 and 1.8% of those age 65 or over.[28]

Census 2000[edit]

As of the 2000 United States Census[16] there were 560 people, 246 households, and 148 families residing in the borough. The population density was 1,026.5 people per square mile (393.1/km2). There were 258 housing units at an average density of 472.9 per square mile (181.1/km2). The racial makeup of the borough was 98.57% White, 0.89% Asian, and 0.54% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 0.54% of the population.[26][27]

There were 246 households out of which 28.5% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 50.4% were married couples living together, 6.5% had a female householder with no husband present, and 39.8% were non-families. 30.5% of all households were made up of individuals and 11.0% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.28 and the average family size was 2.94.[26][27]

In the borough the population was spread out with 21.3% under the age of 18, 4.3% from 18 to 24, 34.5% from 25 to 44, 25.2% from 45 to 64, and 14.8% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 41 years. For every 100 females there were 87.9 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 85.3 males.[26][27]

The median income for a household in the borough was $51,406, and the median income for a family was $65,000. Males had a median income of $42,083 versus $36,250 for females. The per capita income for the borough was $25,712. About 1.3% of families and 2.0% of the population were below the poverty line, including 1.7% of those under age 18 and 1.0% of those age 65 or over.[26][27]

Government[edit]

Local government[edit]

Stockton is governed under the Borough form of New Jersey municipal government. The government consists of a Mayor and a Borough Council comprising six council members, with all positions elected at large. A Mayor is elected directly by the voters to a four-year term of office. The Borough Council consists of six members elected to serve three-year terms on a staggered basis, with two seats coming up for election each year.[5]

As of 2013, the Mayor of Stockton Borough is Stephen Giocondo, whose term of office ends December 31, 2015. Members of the Borough Council are Council President Michael Hagerty, Neal Esposito, Aaron Lipsen, Nic Messina, Timothy Nemeth and Kate Steffanelli.[4]

Federal, state and county representation[edit]

Stockton is located in the 7th Congressional District[29] and is part of New Jersey's 16th state legislative district.[8][30][31] Prior to the 2011 reapportionment following the 2010 Census, Stockton had been in the 23rd state legislative district.[32] Prior to the 2010 Census, Stockton had been part of the 12th Congressional District, a change made by the New Jersey Redistricting Commission that took effect in January 2013, based on the results of the November 2012 general elections.[32]

New Jersey's Seventh Congressional District is represented by Leonard Lance (R, Clinton Township).[33] New Jersey is represented in the United States Senate by Cory Booker (D, Newark; took office on October 31, 2013, after winning a special election to fill the seat of Frank Lautenberg)[34][35] and Bob Menendez (D, Paramus).[36][37]

For the 2014-2015 Session, the 16th District of the New Jersey Legislature is represented in the State Senate by Christopher Bateman (R, Somerville) and in the General Assembly by Jack Ciattarelli (R, Hillsborough Township) and Donna Simon (R, Readington Township). [38][39] The Governor of New Jersey is Chris Christie (R, Mendham Township).[40] The Lieutenant Governor of New Jersey is Kim Guadagno (R, Monmouth Beach).[41]

Hunterdon County is governed by a five-member Board of Chosen Freeholders, who serve three-year terms of office at-large on a staggered basis, with either one or two seats up for election each year. At an annual reorganization meeting held each January, the freeholders select one member to serve as the board's Director and another to serve as Deputy Director.[42] As of 2014, Hunterdon County's Freeholders are Freeholder Director J. Matthew Holt (R; Clinton Town, 2015),[43] Freeholder Deputy Director John King (R; Raritan Township, 2015),[44] Suzanne Lagay (R; Holland Township, 2016),[45] John E. Lanza (R; Flemington, 2016)[46] and Robert G. Walton (R; Hampton, 2014).[47][48] Constitutional officers elected on a countywide basis are County Clerk Mary H. Melfi (R; Flemington, 2017),[49] Sheriff Fredrick W. Brown (R; Alexandria Township, 2016)[50] and Surrogate Susan J. Hoffman (R; Kingwood Township, 2018).[51][52][53]

Politics[edit]

As of March 23, 2011, there were a total of 396 registered voters in Stockton, of which 166 (41.9%) were registered as Democrats, 127 (32.1%) were registered as Republicans and 102 (25.8%) were registered as Unaffiliated. There was one voter registered to another party.[54]

In the 2008 presidential election, Democrat Barack Obama received 59.3% of the vote here (210 cast), ahead of Republican John McCain with 38.1% (135 votes) and other candidates with 1.4% (5 votes), among the 354 ballots cast by the borough's 405 registered voters, for a turnout of 87.4%.[55] In the 2004 presidential election, Democrat John Kerry received 57.3% of the vote here (200 ballots cast), outpolling Republican George W. Bush with 41.5% (145 votes) and other candidates with 1.0% (4 votes), among the 349 ballots cast by the borough's 412 registered voters, for a turnout percentage of 84.7.[56]

In the 2009 gubernatorial election, Republican Chris Christie received 45.7% of the vote here (122 ballots cast), ahead of Democrat Jon Corzine with 43.4% (116 votes), Independent Chris Daggett with 8.2% (22 votes) and other candidates with 1.9% (5 votes), among the 267 ballots cast by the borough's 398 registered voters, yielding a 67.1% turnout.[57]

Education[edit]

The Stockton Borough School District serves public school students in preschool through sixth grade. The Stockton Borough School had an enrollment of 41 students as of the 2010-11 school year,[58] making it the smallest school district in New Jersey.[59] Constructed in 1872, the Stockton Borough School's three-room building is the oldest school structure in the state still in use as a public school.[4]

Public school students in seventh through twelfth grades attend the South Hunterdon Regional High School in Lambertville, part of the South Hunterdon Regional High School District, which served 352 students in southern Hunterdon County in the 2010-11 school year.[60] Students from Lambertville, Stockton and West Amwell Township attend South Hunterdon Regional High School.[61][62][63]

In a special election held in September 2013, voters from Lambertville, Stockton and West Amwell Township passed referenda to dissolve the South Hunterdon Regional School District and to combine the three existing school districts from each municipality (Lambertville City School District, Stockton Borough School District and West Amwell Township School District), with majorities in each community passing both ballot items. A single combined regional district would be created, serving students in pre-Kindergarten through twelfth grade, in which property taxes would be levied under a formula in which 57% is based on property values and 43% on the number of students. The executive county superintendent will appoint an interim board of education for the new regional district, which will be responsible for implementing the merger.[64]

History[edit]

Stockton is located along the Delaware River north of Lambertville. The community was first known as Reading Ferry and later as Howell's Ferry. The name was changed to Centre Bridge Station to match the name of the post office and hamlet on the Pennsylvania side of the river. The name became Stockton with the creation of a local post office in 1851. The town was named in honor of U.S. Senator Robert Field Stockton, who was instrumental in the creation of the Delaware and Raritan Canal.[65] The Borough was incorporated in 1898, having been separated from Delaware Township.[4]

Historic locations and sightseeing[edit]

The Prallsville Grist Mill

The tiny town remains today much as it was in the eighteenth century. For all its small size and charm, the town is presided over by an old inn, the Stockton Inn (formerly known as Colligan's Stockton Inn). Established in 1710, it is the inn that was immortalized by Richard Rodgers in the song "There's a Small Hotel (with a wishing well)" sung in the Broadway play On Your Toes. First built as a private residence it is believed to have been converted to an inn around 1832. The Stockton Inn is now a historic restaurant with fireside dining in winter and garden dining in season. The Stockton Inn was acquired in June 2012 by Mitch Millett.[65]

The Delaware River Mill Society was formed to preserve and promote the buildings and site known as the Prallsville Mills. John Prall, Jr., became the owner of the site in 1794 and with his settlement the area became known as Prallsville.[66]

The Delaware River Mill Society is a private non- profit organization responsible for the restoration, maintenance, and operation of the historic John Prall Jr. House and the Prallsville Mills Complex, which was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1973. The entire property became part of the D & R Canal State Park in 1973. In 1976 when the State of New Jersey was unable to fund the restoration of its newly acquired Prallsville Mills, local citizens formed the Delaware River Mill Society, to “restore, preserve, operate, maintain and interpret” the historic site. The Mill Society's mission is to save a segment of our past and make it a part of today's community. The Mill has become a place of cultural and environmental events attracting widespread participation. Concerts, art exhibitions, antique shows, holiday parties, school fund-raiser auctions, meetings, as well as private parties, are a source of income for restoration and maintenance of the site.[67] The site currently includes artist Ty Hodanish's studio and gallery, known as The Art Colony, which is housed in the Linseed Mill. The Mill is also situated in the center of the Delaware River Scenic Byway.[68]

Notable people[edit]

Notable current and former residents of Stockton include:

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. 2011-02-12. Retrieved 2011-04-23. 
  2. ^ a b c d e Gazetteer of New Jersey Places, United States Census Bureau. Accessed June 14, 2013.
  3. ^ 2013 New Jersey Mayors Directory, New Jersey Department of Community Affairs. Accessed May 13, 2013.
  4. ^ a b c d Stockton Borough, Hunterdon County, New Jersey. Accessed July 21, 2013.
  5. ^ a b 2012 New Jersey Legislative District Data Book, Rutgers University Edward J. Bloustein School of Planning and Public Policy, March 2013, p. 103.
  6. ^ U.S. Geological Survey Geographic Names Information System: Borough of Stockton, Geographic Names Information System. Accessed March 14, 2013.
  7. ^ a b c d e f DP-1 - Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 Demographic Profile Data for Stockton borough, Hunterdon County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed May 22, 2012.
  8. ^ a b c d Municipalities Grouped by 2011-2020 Legislative Districts, New Jersey Department of State, p. 8. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  9. ^ a b c Table DP-1. Profile of General Demographic Characteristics: 2010 for Stockton borough, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development. Accessed May 22, 2012.
  10. ^ "N.J.'s population shifting to coast, south". USA Today. 2011. Retrieved February 27, 2011. 
  11. ^ a b PEPANNRES - Annual Estimates of the Resident Population: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2012 - 2012 Population Estimates for New Jersey municipalities, United States Census Bureau. Accessed July 7, 2013.
  12. ^ a b GCT-PH1 Population, Housing Units, Area, and Density: 2010 - State -- County Subdivision from the 2010 Census Summary File 1 for New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed November 15, 2012.
  13. ^ Look Up a ZIP Code for Stockton, NJ, United States Postal Service. Accessed May 23, 2012.
  14. ^ Zip Codes, State of New Jersey. Accessed August 30, 2013.
  15. ^ Area Code Lookup - NPA NXX for Stockton, NJ, Area-Codes.com. Accessed August 30, 2013.
  16. ^ a b "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  17. ^ A Cure for the Common Codes: New Jersey, Missouri Census Data Center. Accessed May 23, 2012.
  18. ^ "US Board on Geographic Names". United States Geological Survey. 2007-10-25. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  19. ^ Table 7. Population for the Counties and Municipalities in New Jersey: 1990, 2000 and 2010, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development, February 2011. Accessed November 15, 2012.
  20. ^ Snyder, John P. The Story of New Jersey's Civil Boundaries: 1606-1968, Bureau of Geology and Topography; Trenton, New Jersey; 1969. p. 157. Accessed May 23, 2012.
  21. ^ a b Stockton Borough History, Hunterdon County, New Jersey. Accessed May 23, 2012.
  22. ^ Compendium of censuses 1726-1905: together with the tabulated returns of 1905, New Jersey Department of State, 1906. Accessed August 30, 2013.
  23. ^ Thirteenth Census of the United States, 1910: Population by Counties and Minor Civil Divisions, 1910, 1900, 1890, United States Census Bureau, p. 337. Accessed May 23, 2012. Population is not listed for 1900.
  24. ^ Fifteenth Census of the United States : 1930 - Population Volume I, United States Census Bureau, p. 716. Accessed May 23, 2012.
  25. ^ New Jersey Resident Population by Municipality: 1930 - 1990, Workforce New Jersey Public Information Network, backed up by the Internet Archive as of May 2, 2009. Accessed May 23, 2012.
  26. ^ a b c d e Census 2000 Profiles of Demographic / Social / Economic / Housing Characteristics for Stockton borough, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed November 15, 2012.
  27. ^ a b c d e DP-1: Profile of General Demographic Characteristics: 2000 - Census 2000 Summary File 1 (SF 1) 100-Percent Data for Stockton borough, Hunterdon County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed November 15, 2012.
  28. ^ DP03: Selected Economic Characteristics from the 2006-2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates for Stockton borough, Hunterdon County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed May 23, 2012.
  29. ^ Plan Components Report, New Jersey Redistricting Commission, December 23, 2011. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  30. ^ 2012 New Jersey Citizen's Guide to Government, p. 65, New Jersey League of Women Voters. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  31. ^ Districts by Number for 2011-2020, New Jersey Legislature. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  32. ^ a b 2011 New Jersey Citizen's Guide to Government, p. 65, New Jersey League of Women Voters. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  33. ^ Directory of Representatives: New Jersey, United States House of Representatives. Accessed January 5, 2012.
  34. ^ Cory A. Booker, United States Senate. Accessed November 5, 2013.
  35. ^ Nutt, Amy Ellis (October 31, 2013). "Booker is officially a U.S. senator after being sworn in". NJ.com/Associated Press. Accessed October 31, 2013.
  36. ^ Biography of Bob Menendez, United States Senate. Accessed November 5, 2013. "He currently lives in North Bergen and has two children, Alicia and Robert."
  37. ^ Senators of the 113th Congress from New Jersey. United States Senate. Accessed November 5, 2013.
  38. ^ Legislative Roster 2014-2015 Session, New Jersey Legislature. Accessed January 30, 2014.
  39. ^ District 16 Legislators, New Jersey Legislature. Accessed January 30, 2014.
  40. ^ "About the Governor". State of New Jersey. Retrieved 2010-01-21. 
  41. ^ "About the Lieutenant Governor". State of New Jersey. Retrieved 2010-01-21. 
  42. ^ About the Board, Hunterdon County, New Jersey. Accessed June 30, 2014.
  43. ^ Matt Holt, Hunterdon County, New Jersey. Accessed June 30, 2014.
  44. ^ John King, Hunterdon County, New Jersey. Accessed June 30, 2014.
  45. ^ Suzanne Lagay, Hunterdon County, New Jersey. Accessed June 30, 2014.
  46. ^ John E. Lanza, Hunterdon County, New Jersey. Accessed June 30, 2014.
  47. ^ Robert G. Walton, Hunterdon County, New Jersey. Accessed June 30, 2014.
  48. ^ Hunterdon County Board of Chosen Freeholders, Hunterdon County, New Jersey. Accessed June 30, 2014.
  49. ^ Hunterdon County Clerk Mary H. Melfi, Hunterdon County, New Jersey. Accessed June 30, 2014.
  50. ^ Frederick W. Brown; Hunterdon County Sheriff, Hunterdon County, New Jersey. Accessed June 30, 2014.
  51. ^ Surrogate Susan J. Hoffman, Hunterdon County, New Jersey. Accessed June 30, 2014.
  52. ^ 2014 Elected Officials, Hunterdon County, New Jersey. Accessed June 30, 2014.
  53. ^ Wichert, Bill. "Hunterdon County sheriff re-elected, GOP newcomers win freeholder seats", The Star-Ledger, November 5, 2013. Accessed June 30, 2014. "County Sheriff Frederick Brown won a second three-year term over Democratic challenger Paul Carluccio. County Surrogate Susan Hoffman, who ran unopposed, also won re-election to a five-year term.When they join the all-Republican freeholders board in January, Lanza and Lagay will fill the seats vacated by Republicans George Melick and Will Mennen."
  54. ^ Voter Registration Summary - Hunterdon, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, March 23, 2011. Accessed November 15, 2012.
  55. ^ 2008 Presidential General Election Results: Hunterdon County, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, December 23, 2008. Accessed November 15, 2012.
  56. ^ 2004 Presidential Election: Hunterdon County, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, December 13, 2004. Accessed November 15, 2012.
  57. ^ 2009 Governor: Hunterdon County, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, December 31, 2009. Accessed November 15, 2012.
  58. ^ Data for the Stockton Borough School, National Center for Education Statistics. Accessed May 23, 2012.
  59. ^ Staff. "Deadline extended for "School Choice" applications; seven Hunterdon districts added to state program", Hunterdon County Democrat, April 15, 2011. Accessed November 15, 2012. "Stockton, the smallest public school in the state, has accepted tuition students for many years. The K-6 school has four classrooms, with two grades per teacher, starting in first grade."
  60. ^ Data for the South Hunterdon Regional High School District, National Center for Education Statistics. Accessed September 30, 2013.
  61. ^ Lambertville Public School 2013 Report Card Narrative, New Jersey Department of Education. Accessed October 15, 2013. "Students interact with their peers at the West Amwell, Stockton, and South Hunterdon Regional High School through site visits and the use of social media technology. Teachers from each district also participate in shared professional development activities and on-going collaboration to provide vertical and horizontal articulation between and among all grades from pre K-12."
  62. ^ South Hunterdon Regional High School 2013 Report Card Narrative, New Jersey Department of Education. Accessed October 15, 2013. "Bordering the Delaware River and located in the culturally rich and rural region of Southern Hunterdon County, South Hunterdon Regional High School serves the communities of Lambertville, Stockton, and West Amwell."
  63. ^ Public School Directory 2012-2013, p. 59. Hunterdon County Department of Education. Accessed October 15, 2013
  64. ^ Tredrea, John. "LAMBERTVILLE: Schools turn how to make merger work; After historic vote, decisions on buildings, contracts need to be made", The Beacon, October 2, 2013. Accessed October 15, 2013. "Now that the two referendum questions on merging the Stockton, West Amwell, Lambertville and South Hunterdon Regional High School districts into one pre-k to grade 12 district have been overwhelmingly approved, the process of implementing the regionalization can begin."
  65. ^ a b "Stockton Borough History". County of Hunterdon. Retrieved 2005-11-26. 
  66. ^ Buck's County Herald Area Guidebook, accessed November 11, 2007
  67. ^ History, Delaware River Mill Society. Accessed August 30, 2013.
  68. ^ Stockton, New Jersey Tourism. Accessed August 30, 2013.
  69. ^ J. P. Miller, James A. Michener Art Museum. Accessed November 15, 2012. "At the time of his death, Miller was at work on an autobiography at his home in Stockton, New Jersey, where he lived since 1965."

External links[edit]