Stott Pilates

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Stott Pilates
Type Brand
Industry
Founded Toronto, Ontario, Canada (1988 (1988))
Founder(s) Moira and Lindsay G. Merrithew
Headquarters Toronto, Ontario, Canada
Area served
Key people

Lindsay G. Merrithew, Co-Founder, President, and CEO,

Moira Merrithew, Co-Founder and Executive Director of Education
Services
Owner(s) Moira and Lindsay G. Merrithew
Employees ~100
Parent Merrithew Health & Fitness
Website merrithew.com/stottpilates/

Stott Pilates is a contemporary version[1][2] of the Pilates method of physical exercise. It was developed by Lindsay and Moira Merrithew,[3][4] with the collaboration of physical therapists, and sports medicine and fitness professionals, to ensure the method stays up-to-date with current scientific and biomechanical research. The most significant difference between Stott Pilates and Joseph Pilates's original method of the early 1900s is that, where the original method uses a straight spine during exercise, Stott Pilates focuses on maintaining the natural curvature of the spine.[5]

Stott Pilates, until 2010, when it merged with Merrithew Health & Fitness, offered Stott Pilates training and certification to instructors at venues on six continents. By 2013, there were approximately 38,000 Stott Pilates-trained instructors in over 100 countries (from the company website[6]), and it commemorated its 25th. anniversary with its Mindful Movement World Tour.[7]

Stott Pilates is a sister brand of ZEN•GA, CORE athletic conditioning and performance training, and Total Barre.

History[edit]

Following her career as a dancer with the Bermuda Ballet,[8] and principal dancer with the City Ballet of Toronto and the Atlantic Ballet Company,[9] Moira Merrithew learned, with the help of the Dancer Transition Resource Centre,[10] of the Pilates method of exercise. Moira received her Pilates training in New York City from Romana Kryzanowska, a protégé of Joseph Pilates. After her training was complete and her return to Toronto, Moira and Lindsay developed the Stott Pilates method in the 1980s.

Stott Pilates Reformer class at Toronto Corporate Training Center.
Stott Pilates Reformer class at Toronto Corporate Training Center.

At that time, Pilates was very much a cottage industry and access to Pilates exercise equipment was very limited. Lindsay constructed their first piece of studio equipment, called a “reformer.” Early reformers were constructed out of wood, and Moira and Lindsay recognized that the original equipment designs of Joseph Pilates were not adjustable: the exerciser had to adjust to the machine, rather than the other way around. Early in the 1990s, Lindsay set about designing the company’s proprietary line of Pilates equipment, height-adjustable to suit individual users, to work in concert with the Stott Pilates method. Patents were obtained in the US, Canada, and elsewhere for a reformer apparatus and the adjustable reformer, and patents are pending in Australia and Brazil.

Prior to the conclusion, in 2000, of a trademark case[11] about who was entitled to use the word 'Pilates,' Stott Pilates was known as "Stott Conditioning." In 2010, the company name was changed to Merrithew Health & Fitness, but the name of the method remained Stott Pilates.

The company has produced more than 130 instructional Stott Pilates DVDs for both fitness professionals and at-home exercisers.[12]

Timeline[edit]

1988
Company founded.
1995
Danforth Avenue studio opens
1997
First licensed training centre opened in Bloomfield Hills, Michigan
1998
First training video published
1999
Yonge/Eglinton studio and headquarters opens
2000
Trading name changed from Stott Conditioning to Stott Pilates
2001
First training manuals published; Danforth studio closes
2002
First DVD published
2010
Trading name changed from Stott Pilates to Merrithew Health & Fitness
2013
Over 10,000 Stott Pilates-certified instructors

Principles[edit]

The Stott Pilates method has exercises designed to restore the natural curves of the spine and rebalance the muscles around the joints.[13] The Stott Pilates method places more emphasis on scapular stabilization than other methods. The method focuses on the following five basic principles:[14]

Breathing[edit]

The breath pattern used in the Stott Pilates method involves an expansion of the rib cage out to the sides and back without allowing the shoulders to lift. According to Stott Pilates, it is also important to breathe into the lower part of the lungs, because there is more efficient gas exchange.

Pelvic placement[edit]

Stott Pilates Instructor Training at Toronto Corporate Training Center.
Stott Pilates Instructor Training at Toronto Corporate Training Center.

Pelvic placement emphasizes stabilization of the pelvis and lumbar spine (lower back) in either a neutral or an imprinted position. Neutral placement maintains the normal curve of the lower back: when lying on one’s back, the front of hip bones and pubic bone lie parallel to the mat, and the lower back is not to be pressed into the mat. While breathing and engaging abdominals in this position, no strain should be felt through the lower back. In an imprinted position, the lower back is moving toward the mat.[15]

Ribcage placement[edit]

The rib cage position affects the alignment of the thoracic (upper) spine. When lying on the back in a neutral position, Stott Pilates practitioners maintain the sense of the weight of the ribs resting gently on the mat (that is, they maintain the normal curve of the upper back). They don't lift off or push the rib cage into the mat, paying particular attention to the placement of the rib cage when inhaling or while performing arm movements overhead.

Scapular movement[edit]

When using the Stott Pilates method, stabilizing the scapulae (shoulder blades) on the back of the rib cage is as important as contracting the abdominals during the initiation of every exercise. This helps avoid strain through the neck and upper shoulders. To achieve proper placement, a sense of width is maintained across the front and back of the shoulders, making sure that the shoulders neither round forward too much nor squeeze together toward the spine; shoulders are not lifted too far, nor over-depressed. Placement is somewhere between these two positions.

Head and cervical spine placement[edit]

Stott Pilates placement of the cervical spine (neck) is such that it holds its natural curve, with the head balanced directly above the shoulders when sitting, lying, and standing.[5] In some cases, a small pillow is used when lying on the back, to put the head and neck in a comfortable position. Whenever exercisers lift the head and upper body from the mat, they lengthen the back of the neck and nod the head forward, without jamming the chin into the chest. This way, there is enough room to fit one’s fist between the chin and chest. Once the head is in proper position and the shoulder blades are stabilized (Principle 4), the upper torso can be lifted by contracting the abdominals and sliding the rib cage toward the pelvis.

Training[edit]

Stott Pilates has grown from teaching the method itself to exercisers (students) to training both instructors and instructor trainers.

Student Training[edit]

Stott Pilates Rehab instructor training at Toronto Corporate Training Center.
Stott Pilates Rehab instructor training at Toronto Corporate Training Center.

In the mid-1980s, Moira and Lindsay set up a small studio in Toronto, Canada. Word of mouth, especially from Karen Kain, long-time principal dancer of the National Ballet of Canada, about the benefits of Moira's instruction led to rapid growth of the business, to the point that it grew into and through four studio premises from 1988 to 2003, until it was large enough to take up an entire floor of a major office tower in Toronto; the current headquarters of the business.

Instructor Training[edit]

In the 1990s, Moira and Lindsay recognized that Moira could not handle all the instruction alone, so Moira started educating trainers in their studio in the Stott Pilates method. They also recognized that there was a demand for teaching the Stott Pilates method outside the studio, so Moira codified the repertoire and started a program on how to teach the method to clients. By the end of the 1990s, trainers from all over the world had graduated from Stott Pilates courses.[16] The 2000s saw a significant growth in the number of Stott Pilates-trained instructors and, in 2013, there were approximately 38,000 students trained in the method, worldwide.

Instructor Trainer Training[edit]

In the 2000s, with so many people both exercising with the Stott Pilates method and trained as instructors, Stott Pilates reached the point where it had to educate selected individuals on how to train interested instructors, so instructor training began. In 2013, there were approximately 250 certified instructor trainers across the world.

Certification[edit]

For an instructor or instructor trainer to maintain Stott Pilates certification, he or she must attend a minimum number of courses and workshops each year; thereby keeping current with the method.[17][18] Many Stott Pilates courses and workshops are part of the Continuing Education Credit (CEC) programme, and many of them are also recognized by outside organizations, including the American Council on Exercise (ACE).[19]

Licensed Training Centers[edit]

By 2013, approximately 50 fitness centres around the world were licensed to provide training in the Stott Pilates method.

DVDs[edit]

In the mid-1990s, for those without access to a Stott Pilates-trained instructor, and for those who wanted refreshers in the Stott Pilates method, the company started to publish videos[20] and DVDs of most of its programs,[21] and in several languages. Publishing DVDs increased the awareness of the Stott Pilates method as one of the small handful of contemporary versions of Pilates, and was part of what has prompted at least one industry magazine to describe the company as "Industry giant Merrithew Health & Fitness...."[22]

Equipment[edit]

A group of reformers at the Stott Pilates Training Center, 2200 Yonge Street, Toronto, Ontario.
A group of reformers at the Stott Pilates Training Center, 2200 Yonge Street, Toronto, Ontario.

Stott Pilates exercises can be done on the floor using a mat or on specialized equipment. Merrithew Health & Fitness manufactures equipment used for Stott Pilates exercises. The main piece of equipment used in the Stott Pilates method is the Reformer, which has a horizontal carriage that glides forward and backward on rollers. Resistance is provided using springs, along with other attachments for a variety of exercises and positions (i.e., lying down, seated, and standing). The mat exercises may also include props such as the Stability Ball, Mini Stability Ball, Toning Balls, Flexband, Fitness Circle, etc..

Further reading[edit]

  • Archer, Shirley (2004). Pilates Fusion: Well-Being for Body, Mind, and Spirit. Chronicle Books. p. 23. ISBN 0-8118-3987-7. 
  • Successful Pilates and Yoga Programs. IDEA Health & Fitness Association. 2004. ISBN 1-887781-32-3. 
  • Monroe, Mary (February, 2008). "Icons and Innovators". IDEA Fitness Journal. 
  • Neporent, Liz and Schlosberg, Suzanne (2005). The Fat-Free Truth. Houghton Mifflin Books. p. 306. ISBN 0-618-31073-8. 
  • Teyhen, D. S.; Miltenberger, C. E.; Deiters H. M.; Del Toro Y. M. (2005). "The use of ultrasound imaging of the abdominal drawing-in maneuver in subjects with low back pain". Journal of Orthopaedic & Sports Physical Therapy (35): 350–355. 
  • Hodges, P. W.; et al. (1997). "Contractions of specific abdominal muscles in postural tasks are affected by respiratory maneuvers". Journal of Applied Physiology 83 (3): 753–760. 
  • Kofotolis, N.; Sambanis, M. (2005). "The influence of exercise on musculoskeletal disorders of the lumbar spine". Journal of Sports Medicine and Physical Fitness 45: 84–92. 
  • Richardson, C. A.; Snijders, C. J.; Hides, J. A.; et al. (2002). "The relation between the transversus abdominis muscles, sacroiliac joint mechanics, and low back pain". Spine (27): 399–405. 
  • Crichtley, D. (2002). "Instructing pelvic floor contraction facilitates transversus abdominis thickness increase during low abdominal hollowing". Physiotherapy Research International (7): 65–76. 
  • Akuhorta, V.; Nadler, S. F. (2004). "Core strengthening". Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation 85 (3 Suppl 1): 86–92. 
  • Herrington, L.; Davies, R. (2005). "The influence of Pilates training on the ability to contract the transverses abdominis muscle in asymptomatic individuals". Journal of Body and Movement Therapy (9): 52–57. 
  • McGill, S. M. (1998). "Low back exercises: evidence for improving exercise regimens". Physical Therapy 78 (7): 754–765. 
  • Nadler, S. F.; Malanga, G. A.; Bartoli L. A.; Feinberg, J. H.; Prybicien, M.; Deprince, M. (2002). "Hip muscle imbalance and low back pain in athletes: influence of core strengthening". Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise (34): 9–16. 
  • Rydeard, R.; Leger, A.; Smith, D. (2006). "Pilates based therapeutic exercise: effect on subjects with non-specific chronic low back pain". Journal of Orthopaedic & Sports Physical Therapy (36): 472–484. 

References[edit]

  1. ^ Ogle, Marguerite (2010-02-08). "Contemporary Pilates Teachers and Styles". About.com. Retrieved 8 July 2013. 
  2. ^ Mercer, Lisa. "What is the difference between Pilates and Stott Pilates". LiveStrong.com. Retrieved 10 July 2013. 
  3. ^ "A Complementary Couple". Pilates Style. Retrieved 14 September 2013. 
  4. ^ "Founders' Biographies". Merrithew Health Fitness. Retrieved 10 July 2013. 
  5. ^ a b Mercer, Lisa. "Stott Pilates and the Spine". LiveStrong.com. Retrieved 10 July 2013. 
  6. ^ "Company overview". Merrithew Health & Fitness. Retrieved 8 July 2013. 
  7. ^ "Mindful Movement World Tour photos". Merrithew Health Fitness. Retrieved 1 August 2013. 
  8. ^ "History". Bermuda Civic Ballet. Retrieved 8 July 2013. 
  9. ^ "Pilates who's who". Pilates Insight. Retrieved 8 July 2013. 
  10. ^ 25 Transitions. Dancer Transition Resource Centre. 2011. 
  11. ^ "Pilates Trademark Case Judgement–Opinion 96 Civ. 43 (MGC)". U.S. District Court, Southern District of NY. October 2000. Retrieved 8 July 2013. 
  12. ^ "Interview with Lindsay and Moria Merrithew". Pilates Digest. Retrieved 8 July 2013. 
  13. ^ "Pilates for a healthy back". Spine Institute. The Christ Hospital. Retrieved 10 July 2013. 
  14. ^ "Stott Pilates Five Basic Principles". Merrithew Health Fitness. Retrieved 10 July 2013. 
  15. ^ Merrithew, Moira (2003). Comprehensive Matwork, Essential, Intermediate, & Advanced Reformer. Toronto, Canada: Merrithew Health & Fitness. 
  16. ^ "Stott Pilates Courses". The Central YMCA. Retrieved 10 July 2013. 
  17. ^ Binnendyk, Christine. "Stott Pilates Certification". LiveStrong.com. Retrieved 10 July 2013. 
  18. ^ Arnett, Alison. "As millions throng to Pilates classes, questions emerge over certification for teachers". Stretched to the max. The Boston Globe. Retrieved 10 July 2013. 
  19. ^ "ACE-Approved Providers". Advanced Course Search Results. American Council on Exercise. Retrieved 10 July 2013. 
  20. ^ Beale, Lucy (2005). The Complete Idiot's Guide to Healthy Weight Loss. New York City: Alpha Books, Penguin Group. p. 354. ISBN 1-4362-9402-9. 
  21. ^ "Buying a Home Exercise Video or DVD". Does the instructor have a good reputation?. Windsor-Essex County Health Unit. Retrieved 10 July 2013. 
  22. ^ Bergen, Teresa. "IDEA World Fitness Convention Includes MindBody Crowd". Yogi Times. Retrieved 10 July 2013. 

External links[edit]