Stoughton and Stoughton

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"Charles Stoughton" redirects here. For the American Civil War officer, see Charles B. Stoughton.

Stoughton and Stoughton was a New York-based architectural firm comprising the partnership of Charles (1860—1944) and Arthur Alexander Stoughton (1867—1955) who were born in Mount Vernon, New York. Arthur graduated from Columbia University in 1888 and trained at the École des Beaux-Arts, Paris, which matured an accomplished academic classical style, known especially in the United States, as Beaux-Arts architecture. In this vein, among their joint public commissions was the Soldiers' and Sailors' Monument (New York), dedicated on Memorial Day 1902. The firm won a competition for the design. Following this commission they were asked to design the 52nd Police Precinct headquarters in The Bronx, of red brick and architectural terracotta, with a clock tower, and the 41st Precinct on Mosholu Parkway.[1]

By 1915 Arthur had moved to Winnipeg, Manitoba, where he founded the department of architecture at the University of Manitoba. He returned in 1915 to give a talk in Boston to the National Conference on City Planning on "The architectural side of city planning".[2] He remained in Winnipeg until his retirement in 1930. He designed the University's Fort Garry campus[3] and was commissioned to design the University's Buller Building (1932) and the Tier Building. For the city of Winnipeg he designed three bridges.

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ The AIA Guide to New York City; Sturgis Laurence, "Architectural faience", Architectural Record 21 (January 1907) p. 71.
  2. ^ It was published in Proceedings of the Seventh National Conference on City Planning. Boston, 1915:121-128 (on-line text)
  3. ^ The Canadian Encyclopedia: "Arthur Alexander Stoughton".