Strafford (SEPTA station)

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Strafford
SEPTA Regional Rail commuter rail station
Strafford Pennsylvania Train Station.jpg
Station statistics
Address 97 Old Eagle School Road
and Crestline Road
Wayne, PA 19087
Line(s)
Platforms 2 side platforms
Tracks 4
Parking 289 spaces (115 daily, 103 permit, 71 remote permit)
Bicycle facilities 4 racks (8 spaces)
Baggage check None
Other information
Opened 1876
Rebuilt 1885, 1887, 1999-2002
Electrified 1915
Accessible Handicapped/disabled access
Owned by Amtrak[1]
Operator SEPTA
Fare zone 3
Traffic
Passengers (2011) 763[2] (weekday boardings)
Services
Preceding station   SEPTA.svg SEPTA   Following station
toward Thorndale
Paoli/Thorndale Line
  Former services  
Pennsylvania Railroad
toward Chicago
Main Line
toward Paoli
Paoli Line
Strafford Railroad Station
Strafford (SEPTA station) is located in Pennsylvania
Strafford (SEPTA station)
Location Strafford, Pennsylvania
Coordinates 40°02′59″N 75°24′14″W / 40.0496°N 75.4038°W / 40.0496; -75.4038Coordinates: 40°02′59″N 75°24′14″W / 40.0496°N 75.4038°W / 40.0496; -75.4038
Built 1876
Architectural style Stick/Eastlake
NRHP Reference # 84003226
Added to NRHP 1984[3]

Strafford Station is a commuter rail station located in the western suburbs of Philadelphia at Old Eagle School Road and Crestline Road.[4] It is served by most Paoli/Thorndale Line trains.

The Strafford Station building was originally built for the 1876 Centennial Exposition in Fairmount Park. In 1885, the building was moved to Wayne, Pennsylvania. In 1887, the building was moved again to its current location in Strafford. The station has also been damaged by fires numerous times. The landmark building was constructed in the "Eastlake" or "Stick" architectural style popular from 1855 to 1877.[5] In 1911 the Philadelphia and Western Railroad extended their Strafford Branch to the station. The train station was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1984.

The Southeastern Pennsylvania Transportation Authority (SEPTA) restored the station from 1999 to 2002. Work included restoring the historic station building itself, the platforms, shelters, and canopies. The station was made ADA-compliant with ramps to the platforms. Mini-high-level platforms will be installed after the Amtrak Keystone Corridor project is complete.

The ticket office at this station is open weekdays from 5:50 a.m. to 1:15 p.m., excluding holidays. There are 289 parking spaces at the station, including SEPTA permit parking in nearby lots.

This station is 15.4 track miles from Philadelphia's Suburban Station. In 2011, the average total weekday boardings at this station was 763, and the average total weekday alightings was 775.[2]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Transportation Planning for the Philadelphia–Harrisburg "Keystone" Railroad Corridor" (PDF). Federal Railroad Administration. Retrieved 9 January 2013. 
  2. ^ a b "Fiscal Year 2011 Annual Service Plan" (PDF). SEPTA. pp. 71–72. Retrieved 12 January 2013. 
  3. ^ Chester County Listings at the National Register of Historic Places
  4. ^ Google map
  5. ^ John Milnes Baker, A.I.A. (1994) American House Styles p.86.

External links[edit]