Strategist

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Strategist is a person who creates a strategy, and can belong to numerous fields.

A design strategist has the ability to combine the innovative, perceptive and holistic insights of a designer with the pragmatic and systemic skills of a planner to guide strategic direction in context of business needs, brand intent, design quality and customer values.[1][2][3][4][5]

An economic strategist is a person who can create a sustainable commercial advantage by applying innovative and quantitative ideas and systems at a sell side financial institution.

A sport strategist is a professional that performs scouting and analysis of the players involved in an upcoming competitive match. Sports strategists typically analyze film footage, organize video libraries, and recommend attacks and defensive strategies in order to capitalize on an opponents' weaknesses.

Working closely with investment managers, a principal investment strategist contributes revenue by providing principal investment analytics and alternative product structuring.

A sales strategist develops innovative trade ideas and assists in the marketing of those trades to buy side clients.

A banking strategist partners with investment bankers and capital market experts on corporate finance and capital structure analyses to identify and execute banking transactions.

A trading strategist contributes revenue to the business in which his team is embedded by developing and delivering innovative trade ideas, models and analytic systems to the trading desk.

Within the financial services industry, strategists are known as “strats”.

A military strategist develops strategies in the field of warfare with the objective of outmaneuvering their opponent.

An IT Strategist develops an IT strategy that is aligned with the business strategy to implement systems to give business processes efficiency and productivity gains and therefore a possible competitive advantage.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Lindinger, H., (1991), Ulm Design: The Morality of Objects, Cambridge: The MIT Press.
  2. ^ Gorb, P., (1990) Design Management, London: Phaidon Press
  3. ^ ”Design Management”, Papers from the London Business School, London: Architecture & Technology Press, 1990.
  4. ^ Chung, K.; Freeze, K., “Design Strategy at Samsung Electronics: Becoming a Top-Tier Company″, Design Management Institute Case Study - Harvard Business School Publishing, 2008.
  5. ^ Mataruna, L.; DaCosta, L.P. ,“Video-Scout Methods in Sports", The Brazilian Judo Methods - Case Study - Gama Filho University, 2010.