Strathcarron railway station

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Strathcarron National Rail
Scottish Gaelic: Srath Carrann
Strathcarron
Location
Place Strathcarron
Local authority Highland
Coordinates 57°25′22″N 5°25′43″W / 57.4228°N 5.4286°W / 57.4228; -5.4286Coordinates: 57°25′22″N 5°25′43″W / 57.4228°N 5.4286°W / 57.4228; -5.4286
Grid reference NG942421
Operations
Station code STC
Managed by First ScotRail
Number of platforms 2
Live arrivals/departures, station information and onward connections
from National Rail Enquiries
Annual rail passenger usage*
2004/05  8,658
2005/06 Increase 9,289
2006/07 Decrease 7,856
2007/08 Increase 8,585
2008/09 Decrease 8,310
2009/10 Decrease 8,234
2010/11 Decrease 8,122
2011/12 Increase11,010
2012/13 Decrease9,304
History
19 August 1870[1] Opened
National RailUK railway stations
A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
* Annual estimated passenger usage based on sales of tickets in stated financial year(s) which end or originate at Strathcarron from Office of Rail Regulation statistics. Methodology may vary year on year.
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Strathcarron railway station is a remote railway station on the Kyle of Lochalsh Line, serving the small village of Strathcarron and the larger village of Lochcarron in the Highlands, northern Scotland.

History[edit]

Strathcarron station, August 1980

The station was built by Murdoch Paterson between 1869 and 1870.[2] The station was opened to passengers on 19 August 1870 by the Dingwall and Skye Railway. The lattice-girder footbridge was built by the Rose Street Foundry in 1900.

Current use[edit]

One of the Kyle line's three passing loops is located at the station (and trains are sometimes scheduled to cross here), though the Radio Electronic Token Block signalling system used is remotely supervised from Inverness.

Four trains per day each way call at the station Mon-Sat, with two each way on summer Sundays and a single service each way on Sundays in the winter months.

Preceding station National Rail National Rail Following station
Achnashellach   First ScotRail
Kyle of Lochalsh Line
  Attadale

References[edit]

  1. ^ Butt 1995, p. 222.
  2. ^ The Buildings of Scotland: Highlands: John Gifford. Yale University Press 2003. ISBN 0300096259 p.523

Sources[edit]

  • Butt, R. V. J. (1995). The Directory of Railway Stations: details every public and private passenger station, halt, platform and stopping place, past and present (1st ed.). Sparkford: Patrick Stephens Ltd. ISBN 1-8526-0508-1. OCLC 60251199.