Striated duct

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A striated duct is a gland duct which connects an intercalated duct to an interlobular duct. It is characterized by the basal infoldings of its plasma membrane, characteristic of ion-pumping activity by the numerous mitochondria.[1][2] Along with the intercalated ducts, they function to modify salivary fluid by secreting HCO3 and K+ and reabsorbing Na+ and Cl using the Na-K pump and the Cl-HCO3 pump.

Their epithelium can be simple cuboidal or simple columnar.[3]

Striated ducts are part of the intralobular ducts.

They are found in the submandibular gland[4][5] and the parotid gland.[6]

They are not present in pancreas.


References[edit]

  1. ^ Anatomy photo: Digestive/mammal/salivary2/salivary1 - Comparative Organology at University of California, Davis - "Mammal, salivary glands (EM, Low)"
  2. ^ Anatomy photo: Digestive/mammal/salivary1/salivary4 - Comparative Organology at University of California, Davis - "Mammal, salivary glands (LM, Medium)"
  3. ^ SIU SOM Histology GI
  4. ^ Histology image:10103loa from Vaughan, Deborah (2002). A Learning System in Histology: CD-ROM and Guide. Oxford University Press. ISBN 978-0195151732. 
  5. ^ Histology at umdnj.edu
  6. ^ Oral histology at usc.edu

External links[edit]