Stripe-faced dunnart

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Stripe-faced dunnart
Sminthopsis macroura - Gould.jpg
Conservation status
Scientific classification
Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Chordata
Class: Mammalia
Infraclass: Marsupialia
Order: Dasyuromorphia
Family: Dasyuridae
Genus: Sminthopsis
Species: S. macroura
Binomial name
Sminthopsis macroura
(Gould, 1845)
Stripe-faced Dunnart area.png
Stripe-faced dunnart range
Sminthopsis macroura

The striped-faced dunnart (Sminthopsis macroura) is an Australian marsupial. This dunnart has an average length of 155-198 mm from the tip of the snout to the tip of the tail, snout to anus distance of 75-98 mm, a tail measuring 80-100 mm and an ear length of 17-18 mm. Its weight varies between 15-25 grams. It has a dark stripe between its ears on top of the snout to the nose. The tail is a little fat at the base but becomes slender at the end.

Although this species is described by the IUCN as of "least concern", the NSW Threatened Species website lists it as "vulnerable".[2]

Distribution and habitat[edit]

This dasyurid is found throughout central Australia from the Pilbara to central Northern Territory, western and central Queensland, south to north-east South Australia to north and west New South Wales. It inhabits sandy soils with dune hummock grasslands, tussock grasslands and scrublands.

Social organisation and breeding[edit]

The stripe-faced dunnart breeds from July through February and has a gestation period of eleven days, the shortest of any mammal. The six to eight joeys have a pouch life of 40 days and are weaned at 70 days. There are usually two litters per season.

Diet[edit]

This dunnart's diet consists of small invertebrate ( termites and spiders)and also some small reptiles

References[edit]

  1. ^ Woinarski, J. & Dickman, C. (2008). Sminthopsis macroura. In: IUCN 2008. IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. Retrieved 28 December 2008. Database entry includes justification for why this species is of least concern
  2. ^ "NSW threatened species". Retrieved 30 May 2010. 

External links[edit]